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1911 - 1927 Locomobile 48 & 38 Gathering Place


alsfarms

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16 hours ago, alsfarms said:

Here we are at near the end of this unforgettable Covid-19 experience.  How many 6 cylinder Locomobile owners have put their automobile on the road to celebrate?

Al

we recently took our 1913 Model 38 out for a local HCCA one-day tour. it was the first significant drive that I had with the car. it ran great. lots of power. only issue was getting stuck behind some Model Ts!!!

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On 5/20/2021 at 12:45 PM, alsfarms said:

Thanks for your update and pictures of your 38 Locomobile.  How many miles did you travel?  Did your tour have many other large automobiles?

Al

 

There was a 1910 Pierce Arrow 48 and an early Silver Ghost, along with a 40hp Olds Defender. and a bunch of smaller Buicks and Ts. our local chapter of the HCCA is pretty active and there are a few 1-day driving tours during the spring/summer/fall.

 

I'm learning more about driving the Loco -- double clutch into 2nd, and DONT ever double clutch into 4th or you'll need to come to a complete stop to get it into a gear. the Clutch is very stiff, and sticks a bit when cold, but once it warms up-- you can shift the cart with two fingers. click click click. 

 

if you are wondering -- the car has the original wet steel multi-plate clutch. i've removed it and cleaned i and am running marvel mystery oil with a bit of kerosene to thin it out even more. seems to work pretty well.

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Alan

Found a nice hidden jewel in my grandfather stuff. A envelope post card from Hawaii. He and grandma went to the Far East in 1917-1918 to Sell Gardford Trucks. He also hold Four patents on the radiator. On the front and back of the envelope contains drawing of radiators cores. I think Hawaii was last stop and being in the tropics he start thinking and drawing about humidity, temperature and stop and go effect on it. His fourth patent was submitted 1920. IMG_1437.jpeg.497932953d4bc2690ff1880fff6cb192.jpegIMG_1438.jpeg.1bc04eab0e558481824b35f86fe88612.jpegIMG_1439.jpeg.f23232deddbad40afebeb110bdebb444.jpegIMG_1440.jpeg.42a5615a9ed773690fce3add2a875084.jpegIMG_1441.jpeg.6757f352ca3621ec255476cd04016dbe.jpegIMG_1442.jpeg.4577c58ccced7260a9be7484c7af397e.jpegIMG_1443.jpeg.de8895b7fdc8de39bc53b742a7fca3b6.jpeg

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Who here knows what the latest year the Locomobile 48 was built?  I have understood the 48 was a available until 1927.  Does anyone own or know of a 1926 or 1927 Locomobile 48?  How many 1925 Locomobile 48's still exist?  Does the Durant Club do much in the way of keeping track of the later Locomobile 48 automobiles?  I assume more Junior 8, larger 8's and Model 90's were built than the 48's.  If you are familiar with later production Locomobile offerings, please send me a PM.

Al

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44 minutes ago, alsfarms said:

Who here knows what the latest year the Locomobile 48 was built?  I have understood the 48 was a available until 1927.  Does anyone own or know of a 1926 or 1927 Locomobile 48?  How many 1925 Locomobile 48's still exist?  Does the Durant Club do much in the way of keeping track of the later Locomobile 48 automobiles?  I assume more Junior 8, larger 8's and Model 90's were built than the 48's.  If you are familiar with later production Locomobile offerings, please send me a PM.

Al

 

I would be interested to know this also.   The latest I have ever seen a 48 was dated 1925.   But I am no expert.

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
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I, by reading what I hope is accurate relevant information, this reading suggests that the last few years of Locomobile the 48 was available.  This statement to me means that the 48 could have been available as late as 1926, 27 and even 28.  I also feel that several 48's could have built during this time frame but they would have been few and far between.  At the time, other offerings from Locomobile were trying to find solid footing in the Marketplace, to include the Junior 8, big 8's and the revamped 90.  Even those new offerings would struggle as the financial collapse of 1929 was on the horizon.  Does anyone know of any Locomobile 48's built and sold later than 1925?  I have seen several pictures of what is supposed to be 1925 Locomobile 48's with several different body configurations.  I am curious as to what the last known serial number/motor number would be for the end of the line for the iconic Locomobile 48.

Al

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I have been a serious admirer of the 48 Locomobile for years but had mostly determined that ownership may not happen.  That thought has changed with my purchase of an unrestored 1925 Locomobile 48 Demarest bodied 7 passenger Limousine.  The automobile will require some serious love and attention but does have the makings for a solid enclosed late model 48 Locomobile.  Attached is a picture of this "new" Locomobile project as delivered to my place.  Most of the pieces not shown are present.  However, I will be on the hunt for several items.

AlIMG_20210628_103428314_HDR.jpg.e0c4c880fabe726cdff415600551e2fb.jpg

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A little rougher than mine but with your background I bet you will enjoy the challenge. At the rate I'm going, or should I say at the rate I'm slowing down, you'll probably finish yours first. Where did you find it?? good luck on your new project!

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Here is a funny side bar story on the above shown 1925 Locomobile 48 Demarest 7 passenger Limousine.  During the loading/unloading process the rims and tires had to be removed and also the trailer rear door torque spring assembly moved up out of the way to load/unload.  This is a tall automobile even just standing on the wheels with no rims or tires!  I guess this story is not "funny", it was a pain in the rear getting the Locomobile unloaded!  Now on to better things.  Would those who own 1923 - 24 - 25  Locomobile 48's share privately engine and body numbers for the sake of comparison with this 1925 Model.  This Locomobile has a motor number in the 19,0000 range.  The body number is also close to the same.  Thanks in advance for any help!

Al

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Demarest was I believe located in NY City, so not to far away from Locomobile in Bridgeport, Ct. , although in 1925 the main route between the two cities was a 2 lane road! I may have a sales piece on Demarest, can't quite recall and do not have the time to look until I get a story completed for issue #3 of a new magazine I am writing for - Crankshaft.  I know that they were mentioned in print in the era they were in business, possibly having an advertisement in the custom body salon programs that took place at the Hotel Commodore in New York City.I will check all of this but as I say i can't do it immediately. I love the car you bought! Congratulations. An elegant huge dinosaur it is.

Most likely the interior hardware ( door handles, window cranks etc.) were supplied by Harry McFarland o. of NY City , they also supplied R-R , so if you require any missing pieces perhaps take a look at a mid 1920s RR Silver Ghost or early Phantom I that has a Brewster body just to see if they are the same.

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I totally agree, I love touring cars ( own a Packard ) , but the enclosed body styles had such rich fabrics and appointments , assorted exotic woods used for interior trim , vanity sets, foot rests etc.

Quite possibly the seat springs were made by Atkinson located in central NY state, they supplied most all of the custom body makers in the NE section of the country .

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Yes, This Locomobile will be my highest priority.  I am speaking with the same shop that helped me with the 09 Locomobile engine rebuild to go through the 48 engine.  Another shop is making room to tidy up the fenders and splash aprons.  Then I need to attack the interior.

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There is enough of the original paint to get a good paint color match on each of the 4 colors.  Red on the wheel and pin stripes.  Vermouth on the bottom of the body, black on the top. I am not quite sure what the window surrounds are until I rub a patch out but it appears to be a silver.

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With the size of the body on this Locomobile, I certainly want to stay with the original color scheme and from what I see NO metal flake, just deep rich colors.  I need to check to see if lacquer paint is still available.  My paint supplier has moved away from lacquer paints.

Al

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59 minutes ago, alsfarms said:

With the size of the body on this Locomobile, I certainly want to stay with the original color scheme and from what I see NO metal flake, just deep rich colors.  I need to check to see if lacquer paint is still available.  My paint supplier has moved away from lacquer paints.

Al

 

Agreed.  Looks like deep maroon with black trim?

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I will look closely at door jambs, to see if any mostly unoxidized paint can be found.  If not, I know how to use polishing compound and some elbow grease to renew a patch of the original paint.  If I use a door, I could take it off and take it to a paint supplier that can use a paint spectrometer to come up with the best color match and recipe.

Al

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I have a question about widow lift devices as found on the 1925 Demarest bodied Locomobile 48.  I would guess that this lift device could have been used on other makes also?  If you have had experience with this type of window lift, please post here and share how to set up, load and operate this unit. Attached is a picture.

AlIMG_20210630_141655434.jpg.9f4afa20f445eba9a00db6156a87ecef.jpg

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Here's a 1925 Sportif that I just bought, serial 19323. This car was in Texas when I was a kid, and I saw it the first time in 1963. The then-owner drove the car across state on multiple antique car tours, and even took three vacations through the western U.S. driving the Loco. It took me years to track it down and then after I found it, 10 years to succeed in buying it. I've yet to drive it more than a quarter mile, but I can say that the steering, clutch, brakes and shifting work much easier than on my 1919 Sportif, and the engine is much quieter as well. I look forward to polishing it up and showing it. It was restored in 1989 and shown at Pebble Beach shortly after.

 

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James, great car. It’s always so much fun to be able to put a car in the garage you saw back when we were still in school. I have been fortunate to accomplish the same feat three times. Looks like you will have many happy years ahead driving it. Ed.

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Hello James, Do you have ownership history for your new 1925 Locomobile 48 Sportiff?  You have a great automobile as shown in the picture.  I would like to compare notes with you on this Locomobile and my unrestored 1925 Locomobile 48.

Al

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The 1925 is is one of the 10 or so Locos once owned by Mr. Steward in Tulsa, Oklahoma in the 1940s. He ultimately sold it to H.B. Carroll of Abilene, Texas, and it then went to Bill Harrah, then to a James Leake Auction, then to Clive Cussler. I knew H.B. Carroll, and I talked to a son of Steward about 10-12 years ago. Anyone who knew the earlier history is probably long gone. 

 

On my 1919 Locomobile, I know the entire history from new, and even have pictures of the original owner, his house and the carriage house in which the car was kept. That's pretty rare these days.

 

Fortunately, I do have a lot of Locomobile literature -- owners manuals, factory correspondence, body catalogues and in-factory photo images.

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I just love how "gunboat" gets applied to a car thats not a "gunboat" according to most peoples definition of the word. It's a great car, and doesn't need to be embellished. 

 

Let's play guess the all in price....any ideas?

 

 

 

 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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