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1911 - 1927 Locomobile 48 & 38 Gathering Place


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The switch in question appears to be the ignition switch.  What is the purpose/use of the day, on, night positions?
https://s35.wheelsage.org/format/picture/picture-preview-large/l/locomobile/model_48_roadster_by_merrimac/locomobile_model_48_roadster_by_merrimac_68.jpg

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Let's see if I remember this correctly since I am at work and cannot consult the owners' manual. The keyed Day-On-Night switch gives you two options for shutting the car down. The "Night" option turns off the power to the separate ignition switch, but leaves the power on to the lights on the splash aprons, which come on when you open a rear door. The "Day" option turns off power to both the ignition and the power to the splash apron lights. I just leave the keyed switch "On" in my car for convenience.  

Edited by jrbartlett (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

For those enthusiasts looking for a quality early 6 cylinder Locomobile, check in HMN and look at this nice 1913 Locomobile 38 touring car.   This is the type of proven quality Locomobile that keeps the marque alive!  Nice automobile!   If I could just find that darn money tree...

Al

73899949-770-0@2X.jpg?rev=1

Edited by alsfarms
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Even if you could find a money tree, they are hard to grow. Soil conditions have to be just right. I have tried on several occasions to get one to live myself. People have a tendency to over fertilize.

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8 hours ago, AHa said:

Even if you could find a money tree, they are hard to grow. Soil conditions have to be just right. I have tried on several occasions to get one to live myself. People have a tendency to over fertilize.

 

I agree, I've never had any luck getting one to grow, I was even trying not to be greedy and just planted a five dollar bill.  Might be the soil, though  as I planted some bird seed in the same plot and the birds never popped out of the ground either...

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I wonder if Hugh could be encouraged to share a little more information about his recent purchase with us. It seems he purchased one car in relatively complete condition and one totally disassembled? What condition is the complete one in? There is much talk on the forum about leaving complete cars alone cosmetically and restoring the mechanics. This seems like a wise choice, especially in this market. Pictures?

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This money tree thing must be a very guarded and well kept secret!  It must be a workable solution for some of us as the market seems vibrant in some areas yet significantly slumping in other areas.  (I think I am on the "Slump" side of things).   I have a barren patch of ground in my back yard, maybe I will follow Al's suggestion and try again but with less fertilizer, to get that Money tree to take root!  Hugh, if you are checking in, share an update on the Locomobile projects. Maybe we can offer some moral support as you launch your restorations.

Al

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One more thought....:-)

I would like to figure out the Bird seed growing birds also.  I would like to plant some sparrow hawk seeds to seed if we can control the darn squawking Eurasian Doves that are taking over here.  They have even run off the Starlings and they are bad enough!  More sparrow Hawks may help to control the undesirable birds.  I will let you know how my idea works out....

Al 

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A quick update, I have nothing to update!

            First, I lost my phone with the pictures of two of the Locomobiles I bought, I'm not smart enough to have them transfer to the cloud as I took them (or if you can really do that).

            Second, then in March the virus hit the shop where they are stored, so I had stayed away from it. I’m in good health but at 83 years old. I want nothing to do with that crap. As time passed the virus spread to the other employees so the shop is near a stand still. I waited 82 years to find these jewels and for me to be away from them for an extended period of time is no big deal to me. My health is.

            What little activity that has happened in the shop involved several flip cars I invested to while purchasing the Locomobiles. My only regret is I have not been able to inventory the spare parts that came with the cars.  

            Thank everyone that has showed an interest!

           

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Here is a picture of another Locomobile for sale at auction.  This one is listed as a 1919 48.  Does anyone know the history of this car.  It must be a rebody or some form of a custom.  The cowl looks close to what a 1927-28 8-70 or 8-80 looks like.  It looks like it should be a nice running automobile.  I would like a ride in this one.

Al

1919 Locomobile Model 48 (CC-1382517) for sale in Online, California

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Hugh, Where I am, in Utah, is at the center of Covid-19 activity also!  Things are grinding along very slowly!  Take care of yourself so you can give us a grand photo tour of your projects, and project update, when things clear up and we can get back to work.

Al

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Here is a question for early Locomobile owners, either 4 or 6 cylinder models.

I am desirous to get an idea for the gasoline cap.  I will build what I need or get a casting, but I do want to end up with as would have been from the factory.  Can anyone share a picture from a four cylinder car or an early six cylinder car, (Locomobile)?
Al

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hmmmm...... I have heard of several nice Locomobile automobiles that have changed hands without going to auction, as of late.  It looks like "word of mouth" is still a very active sells medium.  Maybe also the squeaky wheel gets the grease idea.  If I knew of a "Locomobile" that I had an interest in, I would stay in contact with the owner and maybe eventually I would be give an opportunity to purchase.

Al

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Hi Guys, 

 

I'm now officially watching this thread.   The roadster from the RM auction is carrying LeBaron tags,  and may in fact be a later LeBaron  body swapped over at some point.   I don't believe the history goes back very far so I guess it would be important to know when.

 

As a later Classic car guy I guess it was inevitable that the 500 and something cubic inches of a 48 would make me take notice at some point.    I talked to the owner (or restored the car) of the 48 pictured below extensively at a show last year which is what got me interested.  

 

I have some pictures of it in the late 40s racing around a track with other prewar cars.  I'll find those and post them here.

IMG_5820.JPG

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I am no expert on this particular Locomobile, but, if I were a betting man...I would say yes it is the same.  Now do you have back information on the setting of this picture?  Location and what was the event?  I wonder what the automobile is just to the right of the Locomobile left front fender?  I would also surmise that if this picture was taken in 1948, many of hte automobile seen in this picture are likely still in original dress, maybe "fixed up" as needed but not restored.  Nice picture.... Thanks for posting!

Al

Edited by alsfarms
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7 minutes ago, alsfarms said:

I am no expert on this particular Locomobile, but, if I were a betting man...I would say yes it is the same.  Now do you have back information on the setting of this picture?  Location and what was the event?  I wonder what the automobile is just to the right of the Locomobile left front fender?  I would also surmise that if this picture was taken in 1948, many of hte automobile seen in this picture are liekly still in original dress, maybe "fixed up" as needed but not restored.  Nice picture.... Thanks for posting!

Al

 

Photo comes from a lot I have all from the late 40s and 50s taken in the north east.   Some we have identified as NY, Penn, etc.   Here are some others from the same event.   The roadster is a Stanley.    Somewhere from the same batch I have some pictures of that Merrimac bodied roadster with the very long square back.  I think it is green now.

WaltRaceTrack-1-Smaller.jpg

https://content.invisioncic.com/r277599/monthly_2020_04/WaltRaceTrack-2-smaller.thumb.jpg.672286cc2faeee8dd4ef42cd79d8b35a.jpg

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Here is an interesting article, from the well done Internet news room of "Old Motor",  regarding an early, modified Locomobile 48 "Model M".  Share your thoughts and any information you may have.  Go directly to Old Motor so see this article and other very informative and automotive interesting information.

Al

  image.thumb.png.66c666ae2c306132321d14dd75e90b8c.png

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Hello everyone, I am about to endeavor on doing some work on the clutch of my 1920 model 48.  It is noisy when the clutch pedal is depressed and very grabby/jerky when engaging.  On the latter point, I am thinking that the asbestos discs between the steel discs may have worn out.  I've never gotten into a model 48 clutch before and was wondering if anyone here knows more about them than me.

 

Thank you.

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Hello John,

Your clutch problem will probably need to be taken apart to really know what is going on to cause the misbehavior you mentioned.  The clutch is straight forward.  As you start the process, attach pictures here so we can see exactly what is going on.  We can then offer some specific suggestions.

Al

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  • 3 weeks later...

My clutch (1919 Model 48) is also noisy when disengaged -- I was told 10 years ago by a Locomobile old-timer that it's a function of all those multiple clutch discs (is it 17 of them?) rattling around when not engaged. Also, when engaged my clutch is not noisy, but the pedal is at least one and a half inches below the brake pedal. I was told that if they are at the same level, it means the clutch is worn out. I don't think my clutch is grabby, but it is very heavy and sensitive. I'm used to it.

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Has anyone, visiting here, heard of what happened to the burnt out Locomobile chassis in southern Cal.?  It was posted on several lesser forums then pulled off only to be relisted elsewhere.  There could have been a few pieces that might still be usable even after the serious heat treatment it received in the fire sometime ago then left out to weather.  Share information.

Al

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Looking for a round push on / push off switch that was used for many years on Locomobiles. 

Looking for model 38, 6-cylinder water manifolds and single port exhaust manifold.

Also looking for 1917 carburetor adjustment instruction manual.

 

Thanks,

bobaudrey@aol.com

 

IMG_3014.thumb.JPG.b47e79e98221b45704dd22ad7b6b90b9.JPG

 

IMG_3014.JPG

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Frank Jung [frankjung2000@gmail.com] contacted me tonite looking for previous owners of his two Locomobiles.

 

Dear Allen,
Chris Batty suggested contacting you for my search for my Locomobile's history.
Maybe you can help me, have some suggestions or have some information yourself? Here is the starting point: I own two Locomobile model 48 cars, and for both cars I am searching for every possible bit of history before they were shipped to Germany:
One is a green 1917 seven-seater open Tourer (model M7), with Westinghouse air suspension, car number 11371, engine number 9824. The last owner in the USA (until 1987) was Charles William Bailey, 17085 Masonic, Fraser, Michigan 4802.
The second one is a  black type 48-8, 1921 (?) Sedan with sloped windscreen, most probably made by Brewster, N.Y., car number 18319, engine number 13590. This car was sold in 1974 by the large film-car warehouse in California "Buena Park", with the remark being a "good original low mileage car from 20th Century Fox".
What do you think, is there any chance to find something about these cars from your resources? Maybe factory records, Brewster & Co. records, anything to track down the early history, like first owners, or perhaps the films in which the black sedan was used?
I am looking forward to your reply,
hope you had a pleasant Christmas,
all the best for 2021,
kind regards
Frank Jung
Koenigswinter, Germany
 
Image preview
 

 

Image preview

 

I can't help him but maybe you guys can.

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As you can see, Frank is in Germany. At the present, Germany is locked out of internet access to AACA but I have been able to email him. I would suggest any personal correspondence be conducted by the email address I posted above. Otherwise, I will forward to him whatever seems appropriate.

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