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1911 - 1927 Locomobile 48 & 38 Gathering Place


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Bubba,

Thanks for posting the pictures of the unrestored later series Locomobile town car.  That automobile is also a piece of aluminum rolling art.  I wonder what the current status of that unrestored automobile is and where  and who.  Lots of questions.  Looks to have a Delco Dual spark distributor.  That unit does make for a great running engine.  I speak from experience!  Can anyone follow up with current information on this automobile?  Previous history is also nice to associate with the car, who, what, where etc.

Al

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Here are some shots of my car’s interior which, remarkably, is original. A very elegant ride complete with electric one way telephone to communicate with chauffeur, make up and mirror kit on the ladies side and electric cigarette lighter and ashtray on gentleman’s side.

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John,

What a treat to take a look in a "New" 1920 Locomobile.  I plan to stop by, when I am in the neighborhood and see and enjoy your car first hand.  I see a few antique automobiles in the back ground, Model "T" Fords?  What else takes your fancy?

Al

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Re: Driving Loco vs. Pierce & Rolls

 

I have not driven a Pierce or Rolls. But after I bought my Loco, I was talking to a big-time Pierce fan who told me quite forcefully that the Model 48 Pierce was a better driving car due to easier steering, and the absence of rear-spring wind-up while backing up. My Loco has the latter; when you need to slip the clutch while backing up the car tends to buck. I don't think it's the clutch, as there's no clutch chatter at all when going forward, even when slipping the clutch.  It's interesting that the respective Loco and Pierce 48 models have the same wheelbase, engine size and wheel size. Probably ought to drive similarly. But I do consider the Loco Sportif the better looking of the two.   

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Hello James,

I assume that you vintage Locomobile still does utilize the truss bar that connects the rear end to a frame cross member located just behind the transmission?  I can't understand the spring wrap circumstance you describe.  Does anyone else have more thought or idea on that subject as it relates to the later series Locomobile 48?

Al

Edited by alsfarms
clarity (see edit history)
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Hello James,

Would you be able to get your Locomobile off the ground so you could get a good picture, or two, of the torque spring assembly at the front of your torque arm?  I will post a couple of pictures of what an older version of the torque spring arrangement looks like for my 1909 Locomobile.  If your unit is similar, I suspect that one of your springs is simply broken and allows movement in the reverse direction but not in the forward direction.  I like Pierce-Arrow cars real well but they are simply not any better that a well sorted out Locomobile, (and as you have suggested, Locomobile has the masculine good looks).  🙂  Lets see if we can help you sort out the issue you have described with jumping in reverse.

Al

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Here is a picture of a spare intake spring that is finding its way to making another Locomobile 48 have the "breath of life" again.  I hope to hear about a successful first run soon and rubber on the road.  May the mechanics have their hands guided...... 🙂

Al

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Hello,  The air pump seal is not going to be a big deal.  Would you take the retaining bolt out so you can get an accurate measurement on the piston backing plate and share a couple of better pictures of how the inside of the seal is configured.   I think your pump does not pump fuel but moves air to pressurize your system and force fuel to the carburetor with that pressure you pump into the tank.  Lets get you fixed up....

Al 

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Well I got the new valve spring in the engine but discovered something else in the process. Specifically, the new spring is about 3/16” talker than any of my other springs and also appears to be wound tighter. This has me wondering whether the different series of the 48 had different springs. My car is a series 7 but I assumed that the spring from any 48 would work fine. Seeing the slight difference has me thinking. I’ve been reluctant to run the engine because although the spring fits, I don’t want to cause any damage.

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Hello John,

If you are real concerned, I would take the replacement spring and test the compression pull down with one of your original springs.  If it is close to the same, on a compression pull down test,  the differences you note, will not be an issue.

Al

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello John,

Thanks for the picture.  DId you happen to take any video of your very nice Locomobile running and driving?  If so, please share with us.  Do you know anything about the Junior 8 Locomobile that is shown behind your automobile?  It would be nice to have some story behind that Locomobile also...if you can.

Regards,

Al

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Guys and Gals Captain Ahab here and this is my Moby Dick.  It's been eluding me for over twenty years.  This is the first sighting I got of the giant car.

Over the years I have been tracking him but the elusive vehicle never made it to my garage due to one thing or another.  I sat in him once as he mocked me but alas

it wasn't meant to be.  Now he's out there on some road who knows where as I lost track of him after his last sale. Perhaps his owner is reading this now.  I'll post other pictures

but first you may stare at this one as I still do just thinking that someday...........

barn front.jpg

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What a nice story line to think and equate a Locomobile with Moby Dick.  It would be nice to hear any more history/story on this car but only as you know it.  Maybe the new owner will speak up and share some information or another friend.......  This Locomobile must be a closed car and is likely from the mid 20's.  What are other thoughts and observations from this group of Locomobile folks?

Al

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The car was sold at the A K  Miller auction in Vermont.  Anybody who knows about the auction will tell you how things went for crazy prices at the time.  I went up there with a friend

, a flatbed, and cash to bring my prize home.  Spoke to several Loco guys there who informed me of what price it should go for.  I never even got to raise my hand. Went for twice the estimate.

 

It was all original and it was bought by a dealer, cleaned up and appeared at Hershey.   Since then it went to private owners and more dealers with each one doing something else to it.  

I believe the last owner rebuilt the engine then sold it.  The rear interior is still original.  Will post more pics when I find them.

 

barn side.jpg

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I recall that event and only wished that I had the deep pockets and the ability to travel from the mountain west, to attend and purchase a sleeping beauty.  Alas, it was just a dream for me.  It would be nice to hear more stories, like this one, either on this Locomobile or any other elusive Locomobile along with pictures!

Al

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Here is a picture of a Model 38 Locomobile speed car owned by Chris Batty from England.  He needs a few parts as listed in the "Locomobile Parts Wanted" section.  If you can help him please get in touch with him.

Al

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Bubba,

Is that the same car that was in the previous picture? What a transformation! It's hard to believe anybody would leave a Locomobile to rest in a dirt floor warehouse but it appears to have cleaned up well. Do you remember what it sold for when you first missed buying it?

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I believe car above is a 1924 or 1925 and not a limo.  Looking at the dash picture again leeds me to think it's a 1925 series 9.    The car in the barn was bought by a dealer for about forty five grand or twice what it was worth at the time. 

It was cleaned up and is shown below.  Since then a good deal of it was repainted, a new leather top put on, new tires.  The last picture shows the car with the top down and some more restoration done.

pass side ext.jpg

open rear.jpg

Edited by bubba (see edit history)
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