Turbinator

63 Riv AC flush and vacuum

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On 6/29/2019 at 11:28 PM, RivNut said:

Good catch

9dbfbb3d895b3db929ce30c471a6addb.gif.9df41b2bcc809a45348f6b4906fee922.gif

 

 

Probably would have blew up!

Turb

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July 18 2019 93 F with humidity very high. I tested the AC in my 63 Buick Riviera by driving the car and using the AC. I was very comfortable riding on the two way county roads in central Maryland. I stopped for about 15 minutes to show one of my friends I had real AC. After 10 or so minutes the level cool air diminished. The amount of air was fine, it just wasn’t as cold as when I was driving.

 

i did not test the AC air temp with a thermometer. I tested the AC by how I felt. I’m not going to do any more “fixing”  to the AC until I break it. I’m leaving the AC system alone. I will put on a vacuum tank and I might put on a severe duty clutch fan or maybe an electric fan . The purpose of the fan would be to pull more air past the condenser.

 

For all that matter this is a wrap. Many thanks to all that joined in to help me get cold air.

 

Turbinator

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If you're car originally came with air, it came with the 5 blade impeller in the water pump, a fan shroud, and a thermal clutch on the five blade fan.  As long as these items are in good condition, there's no need to try and bolster anything.  Dad drove his 63 Wildcat for years - summer and winter, around town and across country, through the Rocky Mountains and across Death Valley.  Never had it overheat. Always had cold air in the summer and heat in the winter - just as it came from the factory.  Just make sure that all your systems are in top shape. No bent fins in the condenser or radiator, no clogged water passages, and make sure all the rubber seals around the radiator are present and in good shape.  Make sure you're fan clutch operates correctly and your fan is positioned correctly in relationship th the shroud.

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Concur.  My 63 will spit ice cubes or roast weenies, depending on the setting.

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Gents, new water pump, new timing chain cover, no leaks seems  like what is suppose to be tight is tight.

i don’t know why the AC air is much cooler/ colder when driving on a highway. I sit still in traffic and the cold air goes to warmer air. I don’t think the AC was intentionally designed to kick out warmer air fromthe AC. It seems something is not quite right. My gauges had different readings than Tom Telesco’s gauges. Actually, I don’t know whaT gauges are accurate. The price points are all over the map for AC gauges. I would suppose  Robinair would have decent gauges.

Turbinator

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I had the a/c in one of my cars (not a Riviera) turn warm when the evaporator would freeze up.  But that happened opposite of what you're saying.  It would run fine while gadding about town but would freeze up on the open road.  Time for an ice cream cone and a potty break.  Get back in and head on down tbe road again.  It would take quite a while for it to freeze up and with the outside ambient temperatures high, it didn't take long to thaw.

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3 hours ago, Turbinator said:

i don’t know why the AC air is much cooler/ colder when driving on a highway. I sit still in traffic and the cold air goes to warmer air.

Less efficient operation at low speeds is normal behavior, and sitting still at idle will created a noticeable difference (remember that the FSM says to test your AC at 2000 RPM).  But then, you've got that goofy STV eliminator, so maybe your compressor is being shut off at inopportune times.  You might try hooking up an indicator light to the compressor feed so you know when it's engaged.  If you really want to get hardcore, get some long hoses for your gauges, then mount them where you can see them and drive around.

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5 hours ago, KongaMan said:

If you really want to get hardcore, get some long hoses for your gauges, then mount them where you can see them and drive around.

Mr Konga Man, have the gauges so you can see them showing the readings on the high and low side.’ Have the gauge readings recorded for driving on the highway, slow city traffic, and sitting in a traffic jam would be three situations the readings could be recorded. Of course, the readings would have to interpreted for each case.

‘I would not have used the STV update widget had I not had so much trouble with the piston sticking in the rebuilt STV’s. Now, since I have the STV widget  and cold air I do not notice the compressor engaging or disengaging. Heck, maybe the STV widget isn’t working at all? I do have plenty cold air for 88-93 F temps while going down the highway. I guess I just have to keep moving.

 

As far as the clutch fan is concerned I’ve read a severe duty clutch fan stays engaged 80% of the time as opposed to much less time engaged with the stock clutch fan. If I have more air coming through the condenser at very low speed and stop and go traffic would not the  gas shed heat faster and return to a liquid that goes to the evaporator where I get cold air? I’m just guessing at the science of the thing. I’ve found if you know how stuff works hopefully your diagnostics would improve improve.

 

Turbinator

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6 hours ago, RivNut said:

I had the a/c in one of my cars (not a Riviera) turn warm when the evaporator would freeze up.  But that happened opposite of what you're saying.  It would run fine while gadding about town but would freeze up on the open road.  Time for an ice cream cone and a potty break.  Get back in and head on down tbe road again.  It would take quite a while for it to freeze up and with the outside ambient temperatures high, it didn't take long to thaw.

Ed, amazing what power driven mechanical things do. Never ceases to amaze me.

Bob

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Hey, 

 

Where I get those inline filters to prevent dirt in the system? 

Does the filter in the drier will not prevent for damages? 

 

Im rebuilding also my AC (Compressor and hoses was missing) buyed already new Pag oil, dryer and expansion valve. I will fill my system with a butane propane mixture as r134a costs is crazy high in Europe. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, BBK said:

I will fill my system with a butane propane mixture

That sounds like an explosive mixture! Probably not a good idea if you were to get in a front end accident! :unsure:

Edited by NC1968Riviera (see edit history)

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1 hour ago, BBK said:

Hey, 

 

Where I get those inline filters to prevent dirt in the system? 

Does the filter in the drier will not prevent for damages? 

 

Im rebuilding also my AC (Compressor and hoses was missing) buyed already new Pag oil, dryer and expansion valve. I will fill my system with a butane propane mixture as r134a costs is crazy high in Europe. 

Read this forum thread: https://forums.anandtech.com/threads/using-propane-as-ac-refrigerant.164250/

 

I think the extra cost for R134 is not a good enough reason to use combustible substitutes in your AC system. If you do, I hope your life insurance is paid up.

 

My two cents worth...

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Yeah but newer cars are charged with R1234yf which is very explosive. Newer frigess are also charged with propan butan mix. But OK I know the discussion. Maybe if the system is running I will charge the system with r134a. The butan/Propan mixture should be like the old r12a, better cooling and less leaking. 

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tenor.gif.61cb6b88a804f8fb95eda89ede076d3f.gif

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Sir, I tried to find the in line filters myself for my 1963 Riviera AC. I could not find any specifically for my car. I was told the Drier/Accumulator does the filtering. Secondly if you evacuate your AC system properly as well as vacuum the system hopefully the system will be clean. If you have an AC muffler don’t for get to evacuate the muffler as oil can puddle in the AC muffler.

im no chemist, so I can not advise what kind of gas to use in your AC.  I use the virgin R12 Freon in my AC and it cools very well.

best of luck,

Turbinator

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Just as an aside. M/B REFUSES to use the new stuff in their products.   To much of a chance for lawsuits, etc.

Bob, I thought I explained it to you ALL the filters for the low & high sides are a universal fit the reason they ask for piping sizes.   There is NOTHING made specifically for an early car.  I don't even see them listed by make & model for even the new cars.

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On 7/24/2019 at 3:41 PM, telriv said:

Just as an aside. M/B REFUSES to use the new stuff in their products.   To much of a chance for lawsuits, etc.

Bob, I thought I explained it to you ALL the filters for the low & high sides are a universal fit the reason they ask for piping sizes.   There is NOTHING made specifically for an early car.  I don't even see them listed by make & model for even the new cars.

Double T, I bought a filter for my AC, but it was not for mobile AC, but the filter was for some kind AC service machine. I yelled “ Uncle” after that.

Never did find any filter. A supplier told me my drier/accumulator was my filet. I said, “ Fine”.

Turbinstor

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On 7/24/2019 at 3:41 PM, telriv said:

Just as an aside. M/B REFUSES to use the new stuff in their products.   To much of a chance for lawsuits, etc.

Bob, I thought I explained it to you ALL the filters for the low & high sides are a universal fit the reason they ask for piping sizes.   There is NOTHING made specifically for an early car.  I don't even see them listed by make & model for even the new cars.

Ok, Tom. We are on the same team. Please write the name of the filter and what suppliers might have these filters. I would have put the filters on in the first place had I been able to find them. I was probably not describing the filters correctly.

Turbinator

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Severe duty replacement clutch fan I installed replaces the recently new clutch fan installed maybe 6-8 months ago. The purpose of the severe duty clutch fan was to increase cold volume while idling at stop lights. The traffic back ups in my area are more than terrible. The severe duty clutch fan is giving me more cold air while waiting for traffic signals. I bought another ( I lost the other one) AC car thermometer to check the AC temp. I’m fine with the cold air I get now. I’m curious to see the temp of the air.

Turbinator

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The severe duty clutch should give you higher fan RPM at low speed, hopefully while behaving like a normal clutch at higher speeds.  Two things about such a clutch, though:

- It's activated by temperature, which means that until your engine gets good and hot, it's not pulling that extra air.  Of course, that might also means it's not hot enough need AC to begin with. ;) 

- When you run it in the winter, you might find that your heater doesn't work as well.

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2 hours ago, KongaMan said:

The severe duty clutch should give you higher fan RPM at low speed, hopefully while behaving like a normal clutch at higher speeds.  Two things about such a clutch, though:

- It's activated by temperature, which means that until your engine gets good and hot, it's not pulling that extra air.  Of course, that might also means it's not hot enough need AC to begin with. ;) 

- When you run it in the winter, you might find that your heater doesn't work as well.

Mr Konga Man, it will be interesting to see and maybe record just what happens when with the project. Your information is helpful and appreciated. The good thing about winter is I don’t drive the Riv as much. If the roads are salt free and dry I’m likely to take a ride in freezing weather. I keep my head and hands covered pretty good in the winter so I don’t get too cold. It will be fun to see what happens.

Turbinator

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