Turbinator

63 Riv AC flush and vacuum

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On 9/22/2018 at 9:34 AM, Jim Cannon said:

Use new green o-rings on every connection every time.  They are cheap.  Lubricate them lightly with a drop or two of mineral oil as you assemble, to not pinch or tear an o-ring.

 

If you have not done so already, put some UV dye into the mineral oil. It will help you find any leaks more easily in the future, after you charge the system and run it (won't help now).

 

Connect both hoses from your manifold gauge set to their corresponding high- and low-pressure taps on the A/C system, and the vacuum pump to the center hose..  Do not leave one hose off of the A/C ports.

 

 

 

Jim, thank you. Understood.

RRB

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On 9/1/2018 at 12:16 PM, KongaMan said:

Not if you use an adapter. ;)  But the thing is, you can use R12 fittings with R134a (and vice versa).  The different fittings serve as a deterrent, not as a preventative.  If someone wants to mix refrigerants, there's not much to stop them.

Mr Konga Man, I’ve been reading a training manual published by the US Navy. The Navy manual stated never  mix 134a with zR12. The reason is the 134a damages the R12 o rings and causes leaks.

Turbinator

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Gents,  I have reinstalled the AC system with new thermal expansion valve, new evaporator, new condenser, all the AC hoses have been rebuilt with triple wall hose material. The compressor has been rinsed out with mineral oil twice. All new green silicon O rings have replaced and properly lubricated on fitment. After three failed attempts of STV rebuilds I had to use the STV eliminator kit.

The vacuum valve actuators I replaced are new. The vacuum hoses are color coded and new. All the components that could be flushed and although new, were flushed out with CoolPro, just to make sure.

It took a significant period of time to put the system back together because I’m slow and I wanted to make sure leaks upon testing would hopefully be minimal. The only leak was at the STV I retrofitted. Two different times and days I pulled 24” of vacuum that held 44 hours until I took it down. The second vacuum was at 24” for 19 hrs before I took it down.

ill charge the AC WITH R12 when we have some days that are 65-70 F degrees. A number of highly experienced RIviera owners recommended I stay with the STV. Once the STV piston sticks once the piston sticks again. After 3 failed rebuilds of the STV I said, “No mas.”

i would say weak/ poorly trained mobile AC technicians in my area necessitated I replace everything new myself. I’m betting a new, flushed, and leak free AC unit is the most promising situation I’ve had to get cold air in the cabin.

ill keep you apprised of functional AC testing when the weather warms up.

Turbinator

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Bob, I have been following your progress on your '63. When I get to Gettysburg I will look for the red Riviera with frosted windows.

 

Kevin

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2 minutes ago, kegart said:

Bob, I have been following your progress on your '63. When I get to Gettysburg I will look for the red Riviera with frosted windows.

 

Kevin

Kev, I had that caulk pretty well under control. I messed up drilling the holes for #8 screws to hold the dash on. Ended up with # 14 screws. Now I’ve got it figured out how to minimize the size of the screw head. It’s a secret.

i got a 63 Dinsmore compass with a light in it! Too cool for school.

Turbinator

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22 hours ago, Turbinator said:

i got a 63 Dinsmore compass with a light in it!

 

Just when everything seemed to be working right.

image.png.a3513df2312cacf9dd99dece1163cdb1.png

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Will your compass be ready for the next one?  Will you be ready?  🤔

 

A geomagnetic reversal is a change in a planet's magnetic field such that the positions of magnetic north and magnetic south are interchanged. The Earth's field has alternated between periods of normal polarity, in which the predominant direction of the field was the same as the present direction, and reverse polarity, in which it was the opposite. These periods are called chrons.

Reversal occurrences are statistically random, with some periods lasting as little as 200 years. There have been 183 reversals over the last 83 million years. The latest, the Brunhes–Matuyama reversal, occurred 780,000 years ago, and may have happened very quickly, within a human lifetime.[1]

A brief complete reversal, known as the Laschamp event, occurred only 41,000 years ago during the last glacial period. That reversal lasted only about 440 years with the actual change of polarity lasting around 250 years. During this change the strength of the magnetic field weakened to 5% of its present strength.[2] Brief disruptions that do not result in reversal are called geomagnetic excursions.

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Gents, how do I adjust my compass for the current change in true North?

i have the aluminum screw driver included in the kit. ( you are not suppose to use a tool that could be magnetized when making adjustments on the Dinsmore.)

The light at night in the Compass is pretty cool.

Turbinator

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Turb

 

When I calibrated the factory compass in my Chrysler JXi, I went across the street to the parking lot at the ball fields and just drove around in the smallest circle I could 8 times.  That's what the owner's called for.  

 

Probably not helpful to your situation though. 😎

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In which direction did you make the circle? Was your 8 times around clockwise or counterclockwise.? The direction you traveled could have had a BEARING on the outcome.

Turbinator

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Counterclockwise.  I was afraid that I'd wear out the left front tire.  Got kind of disoriented because the car wouldn't maintain a perfect circle.  Got pretty close to a lamp post towards the end. BUT the compass got calibrated.  Don't know if the local gendarmes would have believed me if I'd have been questioned.

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Coordinates. I was the guy who set up gear in the APO’s/FPO’s all over this planet.

When I was putting in some load cell mail scales down range in Central Europe my home office guys asked for the longitude and latitude where the scales were to be installed. My first question was, “ Is not the address of the office where the scale is installed sufficient information ?” No, the techies looked up the coordinates via the address. Had to do with the scale being tangent to the earth.

 

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Bob, where are you sourcing the R-12 for your car?  I'd like to find some to top-off mine (seeing some bubbles in the sight glass but blows cold). I'm leery of screwing mine system up by buying some bogus, imitation garbage on eBay...

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On 8/31/2018 at 9:17 AM, Barney Eaton said:

I can give you a generic answer...........it sort of depends on what you are replacing and where the connections are.

On the compressor,  drain it the best you can then flush some clean oil thru it and drain again.

normally what ruins the compressor is mixing 12 oil and 134 oil........depending on how much of each is left in the system,  they do not play well together and this can cause the compressor to fail.

The failure might happen in 6 mo or 2 years, 

They sell fluids to flush the system but somewhere they said you could use alcohol........cheap to buy at Walmart,  alcohol makes sense as it will break down oil and it also evaporates quickly, 

So I poured it in and blew it out with compressed air...... with the expansion valve removed,  it could also be cleaned.    Newer cars will have the throw away tube type expansion valve.

Not sure I would run alcohol thru the compressor,  and you are right to replace the accumulator/dryer......as the accumulator can "accumulate" it fair share of oil.

Barney, I rinsed my compressor with the same mineral oil I was going to use for the R12. Id put in some oil and shake the compressor and move it upside down and drain. I did this rinse routine a number of times and let the compressor drain overnight.

Then I measured 310ml ( 10.5 oz) and put about 8.5 Oz in the compressor and the remainder in the condenser. I’m real new at this so I charged my AC system with dry nitrogen up to 200 lbs on the low side. The system held the dry nitrogen charge for 44 hours without a leak. 

I vacuumed the system another time to 24”of mercury and the system held the vacuumfor 19 hrs.

In May we average 20 days with 70 F so I’ll charge the system with R12 during a warmer spell. Hopefully, I’ll have cold air this summer 

Turbinator

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