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1966 Mercury wagon restoration problems


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Am slowly restoring a 1966 Mercury Colony Park wagon with the fake wood paneling, like a Ford Country Squire. The last "Squire" type wagon I restored was a '63 Falcon about 10 years ago. Since then, some of my parts sources have disappeared.  Have tried Restoration Specialties & Supply, Classic Ford Parts, and other well known suppliers but these parts still elude me:
1. Window rubber seal for the large, fixed, rear quarter windows.

2. Attaching screws for the fake wood paneling outer frames (attaches to the sheet metal, then a little chrome cap covers the screw head). Can't find these anywhere.

3. Rubber windshield seal. I don't think the sedans will fit, due to station wagon windshield being taller than the sedan?

4. The Di-Noc decal for the fake wood paneling.

 

Any leads on these are greatly appreciated.  The car is worthy of restoration. It has the Super Marauder 428 engine and (I think) every possible option.

Pete Phillips

Leonard, Texas

1966 Mercury wagon.jpg

Edited by Pete Phillips (see edit history)
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48 minutes ago, Pete Phillips said:

Am slowly restoring a 1966 Mercury Colony Park wagon with the fake wood paneling, like a Ford Country Squire. The last "Squire" type wagon I restored was a '63 Falcon about 10 years ago. Since then, some of my parts sources have disappeared.  Have tried Restoration Specialties & Supply, Classic Ford Parts, and other well known suppliers but these parts still elude me:
1. Window rubber seal for the large, fixed, rear quarter windows.

2. Attaching screws for the fake wood paneling outer frames (attaches to the sheet metal, then a little chrome cap covers the screw head). Can't find these anywhere.

3. Rubber windshield seal. I don't think the sedans will fit, due to station wagon windshield being taller than the sedan?

4. The Di-Noc decal for the fake wood paneling.

 

Any leads on these are greatly appreciated.  The car is worthy of restoration. It has the Super Marauder 428 engine and (I think) every possible option.

Pete Phillips

Leonard, Texas

1966 Mercury wagon.jpg

I certainly agree that this a car most worthy of a great restoration.  Its rare and hughly desirable. I have owned many of these over the years but always in a somewhat smaller scale, and always with a boxer and a collie sticking their heads out the rear window. 

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Hi Pete,

 

If you are not successful with Sign Warehouse, let me know. My wife works at 3M and has access to Di Noc. You should know that there are hundreds of wood grain patterns so a sample of what you’re looking for is a big plus. Unless that isn’t critical for the restoration plan.

Keep us posted. Cool project!

 

Mark

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1 hour ago, 54vicky said:

looks pretty solid as to rust great old boats one question what is the 200 mile tape hiding on the left roof?

That's where the rust-through is.  Southern California car all its life, but the myth about rust-free Southern California cars is just that: A myth. I think this car must have lived right next to the ocean. The roof rust was so bad on both sides that I had to find another rust-free roof, cut this one off, and weld the other one on! Don't have any photos since that was done very recently.

The car is worth saving because it has power windows, power vent windows, tilt steering wheel, power front seat, 8-track tape player, seating for 10 (small, dual-facing rear seats), factory A/C, cruise control, AM/FM radio, and the 428 engine.

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I too encourage you to restore it, Pete.  Have a lot of memories for this car.  My father bought one new in 1966 the year I graduated from H.S.  That Super Marauder 428 was really powerful especially on a big boat station wagon.  Could easily burn rubber so I heard.  Dad's was sort of a dark charcoal color with burgundy interior.

 

Regards,

 

Peter J.

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On ‎8‎/‎30‎/‎2018 at 6:07 PM, Spinneyhill said:

Is the cruise control anything other than a hand throttle?

The Ford cruise control through 1966 was not a hand throttle.  You set the speed desired on the dial, turned the unit on and manually accelerated to that speed.  When you reached the selected speed, the unit locked in and held that speed up and down hills.  It worked well.  You can adjust the speed by adjusting the dial.  Touch the brake pedal and it would disengage.  To resume, you had to manually accelerate to the lock in speed again.  In 1967, it became a little more modern with a button on the end of the turn signal switch to push in to engage.  You could hold it part way in to accelerate or all the way in to decelerate.  There was not a resume feature until 1969.

Edited by 61polara (see edit history)
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On 8/30/2018 at 4:41 PM, Pete Phillips said:

That's where the rust-through is.  Southern California car all its life, but the myth about rust-free Southern California cars is just that: A myth. I think this car must have lived right next to the ocean. The roof rust was so bad on both sides that I had to find another rust-free roof, cut this one off, and weld the other one on! Don't have any photos since that was done very recently.

The car is worth saving because it has power windows, power vent windows, tilt steering wheel, power front seat, 8-track tape player, seating for 10 (small, dual-facing rear seats), factory A/C, cruise control, AM/FM radio, and the 428 engine.

thanks for reply thought it looked odd that is what I would call well optioned(loaded)good luck hope it works out for you love wagons have since first one in 76 Caprice I loaded it to then came 84 estate wagon loaded then 93 roadmaster again loaded.up here rust took its toll

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On ‎8‎/‎30‎/‎2018 at 2:41 PM, Pete Phillips said:

The car is worth saving because it has power windows, power vent windows, tilt steering wheel, power front seat, 8-track tape player, seating for 10 (small, dual-facing rear seats), factory A/C, cruise control, AM/FM radio, and the 428 engine.

Interesting, as there is a nicely restored '66 Colony Park locally that is fully option like this one.  I can't remember what it has for a radio, but it does have tilt wheel, power windows, vent windows, and seats.

 

Craig

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Save that big long roof!  ?    Their like will not be seen again! 

 

SUV/crossover my patoot. Those will NEVER have the sheer panache of a big American wagon. My 83 Olds Custom Cruiser recently lapped 400k miles and still runs very well. Looks a little shabby (around here, if it doesn't have an insurance check attached, painters don't want to fool with it) but everything works except the washer pump. Even the remote locking system, which I often wish didn't work...

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Years ago I had several rolls of the factory wood grain vinyl produced for GM. I gave it to Ralph Greinke of Stencils & Stripes Unlimited. He is one of the pioneers of reproduction factory graphics and stencils for cars of the 1960's and 70's. Give him a call, and see if he still has that, or other wood grained vinyls. 

 

If you strike out elsewhere, contact me via PM. My company produces lots of graphics for vehicles, including much of the graphics you'll see on the sides of all MAC Tools trucks. 

 

For weatherstripping, you may be forced to use extrusions and form your own windshield gaskets. Contact Steele Rubber company and Metro Moulded Rubber Parts, Inc. They are both actual manufacturers. 

 

Good luck. 

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On 9/10/2018 at 12:13 PM, Rusty_OToole said:

Chrysler's Auto Pilot debuted on the 1958 Chrysler and Imperial. First cruise control, although others quickly copied it. I think Pontiac had it in 59.

Pontiac had a 'throttle holder' ("Magi-Cruise" IIRC, and I think that didn't appear until '62) and didn't get the true, speed-maintaining 'Electro-Cruise' until '64.

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