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Triumph Acclaim and Plymouth Acclaim


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Hello;

I've just started wondering. In early 80s, BMC made Triumph Acclaim - mostly badge engineered Honda Accord. It's history ended in 1984. Five years after that, Chrysler launched Plymouth Acclaim.

All we know stories similar to that about Peugeot, Porsche and 901.
Were there any legal issues with Plymouth Acclaim? I know that by 1989 BMC was non-existent company, but British Aerospace held it's derivatives.

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I owned a Plymouth Acclaim and it was a good car. Certainly as good as any comparable model from Ford or GM.

 

I doubt the Triumph was ever sold in the US, or the Plymouth in England. There are many examples of 2 cars having similar names, or the same names in different countries. No problem as long as they stay there.

 

There was the case of the Star car made by Durant. It had to be renamed Rugby for sale in British Empire markets because there was already an english Star.

 

Then there was the Dodge Dart and Daimler Dart. The Daimler was renamed SP250 in the US. I don't think Dodge Darts were sold in England.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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Plymouth used the Cambridge name from 1951 to 1953.  It was replaced by the Savoy in 1954.  Austin used the Cambridge name for their four door saloon (sedan) bodied Austin 10 prior to WW2.  While the Austin 10 was not sold in the US, it was sold in Canada beginning about 1934.  After WW2 Austin did not use the name again until 1954 which curiously coincides with Plymouth dropping it in favour of Savoy since Austin Cambridges were being sold in the US at that time.

Edited by dictator27 (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

The names Ranger and Lancer have both had multiple uses.

In Ford's case, they do recycle names on a variety of completely different products.  My favorite example on the 'Capri' name which was used at least six times in North America.  Lincoln used it from 1949 through the late 1950's, then it graced a model of the Comet in the 1960's.  Starting in 1971, it of course got branded on the German Ford offering until 1978 in North America when it got used on Mercury's version of the Fox-body Mustang until 1986.  Last time it was used in North America was on the Mazda 121-based, Australian-assembled two-seater.

 

Craig

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And sideways, in the late '70s Pontiac had color themed Firebirds. There was the Redbird, Yellowbird, and Skybird. Pontiac tried to use Bluebird but the coach company objected. Guess a Firebird could be confused with a School Bus.

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On ‎8‎/‎27‎/‎2018 at 7:48 PM, padgett said:

And sideways, in the late '70s Pontiac had color themed Firebirds. There was the Redbird, Yellowbird, and Skybird. Pontiac tried to use Bluebird but the coach company objected. Guess a Firebird could be confused with a School Bus.

Not to mention, Chevrolet's use of the 'wood' suffix on their station wagons in the 1960's, Parkwood, Kingswood, Lakewood, (and 'Sherwood' on the Envoy wagon in Canada).

 

Craig

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