1/2 Moon

1938 Chevy Business Coupe

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I can't speak for the other make's use of the term "business coupe" but, as CHuDWah pointed out, it certainly was the bargain basement level in the Plymouth line. 

No vent windows, single tail light, dashboard stripped of chrome dressing and painted single color instead of wood grained, black painted fenders, single windshield wiper and single sun visor. Pretty stripped down by any yard stick.

The term "business coupe" must have carried some type of negative connotation for the Plymouth buying public to complain enough about it that the manufacturer actually listened and surprisingly changed the name to Roadking. 

I've seen a number of otherwise plain or originally lesser expensive cars (including a few Plymouth Deluxe P6's) at shows that have had the fenders painted black to contrast with a different body color in order to "dress them up" a bit. I get a personal chuckle out of this when I think of what it represented in 1938.

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4 hours ago, GregLaR said:

I can't speak for the other make's use of the term "business coupe" but, as CHuDWah pointed out, it certainly was the bargain basement level in the Plymouth line. 

No vent windows, single tail light, dashboard stripped of chrome dressing and painted single color instead of wood grained, black painted fenders, single windshield wiper and single sun visor. Pretty stripped down by any yard stick.

The term "business coupe" must have carried some type of negative connotation for the Plymouth buying public to complain enough about it that the manufacturer actually listened and surprisingly changed the name to Roadking. 

I've seen a number of otherwise plain or originally lesser expensive cars (including a few Plymouth Deluxe P6's) at shows that have had the fenders painted black to contrast with a different body color in order to "dress them up" a bit. I get a personal chuckle out of this when I think of what it represented in 1938.

 

 

Just to clarify and AFAIK, Plymouth didn't use the term "Business Coupe", at least not in 1938.  It was simply Coupe for the trunk model and Rumble Seat Coupe for the, well...rumble seat model.  The trim lines were the P6 De Luxe and the P5 Business.  The latter was the cheaper line that included a coupe (non-rumble seat), two- and four-door sedans (flat back), and two- and four-door touring sedans (trunk back).  For whatever reason, customers didn't like the name and Plymouth changed it to Roadking in March, 1938.  I suspect the change had as much to do with sales as with buyer complaints.  1938 was a recession year and Plymouth sales dropped to almost half what they'd been in 1937.  The 38 model had only minor styling changes from the 37 and many thought those changes made the car look plain, if not ugly.  To make matters worse, prices were increased 12% over 1937.  In response to complaints and in hopes of boosting sales, Plymouth made some minor styling changes about the same time as the name change - those changes did improve the looks of the car and the new name for the P5 was more exciting than "Business".

 

The P5 did not come with the features Greg listed but most, including body color fenders, were available as options.  Course if you were going to pay extra for all that stuff, you might as well have bought a De Luxe and more people did than bought Roadkings.  The P5 dash is like the P6 but without the chrome trim - it has only one chrome strip on each glove-box door.  I like it better as I think the De Luxe dash looks too "busy" - just my taste.

 

I don't know that contrasting color fenders per se had a negative connotation - some high-end cars were two (or more) tone.  But on the P5, yeah black fenders probably said "cheap".

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6 hours ago, Mssr. Bwatoe said:

Ah yes but how bout Henry's older brother....The Lincoln-Zephyr V-12 Business Coupe

business coupe.jpg

 

 

The 1940 Zephyr certainly is a beautiful car but Lincoln called it just "Coupe", not Business Coupe (even though they said it was business-like).  OTOH, the 1940 Ford brochure does refer to the "Business Coupe".  It had auxiliary folding seats behind the bench seat.  The version without the folding seats was called simply "Coupe".

 

1613995486_1940FordDeLuxeBusinessCoupe.thumb.jpg.ee5c1a18f41c925b4bce08ab6c7074b2.jpg

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Going back to the original question, which was - is my car a Master or a Master Deluxe?

 

Maybe that point should be sorted before arguing over what the body style is?

 

The chassis question should be answered by looking at the id plate - it will be either an HA (Master Deluxe)  or an HB (deluxe). Going by what I read in The Standard Catalog, the lighter (by less than 100 lb), lower price Master has a 3.73:1 rear end and the Master Deluxe a 4.22:1. Going by that the Deluxe would be a better hill climber and the base model a better open road car.

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40 minutes ago, nzcarnerd said:

Going back to the original question, which was - is my car a Master or a Master Deluxe?

 

Maybe that point should be sorted before arguing over what the body style is?

 

The chassis question should be answered by looking at the id plate - it will be either an HA (Master Deluxe)  or an HB (deluxe). Going by what I read in The Standard Catalog, the lighter (by less than 100 lb), lower price Master has a 3.73:1 rear end and the Master Deluxe a 4.22:1. Going by that the Deluxe would be a better hill climber and the base model a better open road car.

 

 

Umm...see post #3.

 

The OP also said his dad called the car a business coupe but he couldn't find that term, ergo the discussion.  :P

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On ‎8‎/‎21‎/‎2018 at 4:49 PM, Rusty_OToole said:

"Business coupe" or even worse, "Businessman's coupe" gets thrown around quite a bit by people who don't know what they are talking about. I thought it might be time to clear things up a bit.

 

I know they made fancier coupes with no back seat but they weren't business coupes.

 

 

Yup, what he said. 

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A business coupe had no back seat. A club coupe did. A sport (s) coupe had a rumble seat and often side mounts. Doctor's coupe was an early term for a business coupe. Some makers used their own designations such as Studebaker in 42 had a "coupe sedan", some built "close coupled coupes, landau coupes, etc. etc.

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Here's a really nice doctor's business coupe that I wouldn't mind having in my garage.

doctors business coupe.JPG

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