Parrish

34-46 Chrysler 6cyl motor

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Need intake and exhaust manifolds for a 241.6 cid 6 cyl motor or 241.5 cid 6 cyl motor to get the old girl back on the macadam.

Mine is a 34 CA 6.  241.5 came out in 1935 but I think it might fit too.  Waddya think?

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what is a macadam? try desert valley auto parts. they have a lot of these old cars

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11 minutes ago, skyler said:

what is a macadam? try desert valley auto parts. they have a lot of these old cars

Macadam is a road built the old fashioned way.

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9 hours ago, JFranklin said:

Macadam is a road built the old fashioned way.

That is how we do it. There is always Macadam = compacted crushed gravel making up the pavement. The surfacing may be chip seal or hotmix ("blacktop") which comes in a number of types. Concrete is rarely used. Mr Macadam's invention was to make the road of gravel and compact it so it so it didn't turn to mud with deep ruts in the rain.

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1 hour ago, Spinneyhill said:

That is how we do it. There is always Macadam = compacted crushed gravel making up the pavement. The surfacing may be chip seal or hotmix ("blacktop") which comes in a number of types. Concrete is rarely used. Mr Macadam's invention was to make the road of gravel and compact it so it so it didn't turn to mud with deep ruts in the rain.

 

Not a highway engineer, but from what I've read John Macadam's claim to fame was figuring out back in the early 1800s a cheap way to make a good road surface. Basically it consists of crushed rock of a specified size range, rolled into place and then held with a binder of smaller sized crushed stone. The rock needs to have sharp edges so they lock to one another. Apparently very durable when the traffic was horse drawn steel tired vehicles as there is no torque on the wheel (shear on the surface) and the wagon wheels tended to roll any loose material down.

 

The problems with it came up with the advent of rubber tired motorized vehicles as the tires pulled at the surface rather than rolling it flat. Solutions including sealing with tar (tarmac) and more recently asphaltic binders mixed with the rock before being laid down and rolled (asphaltic bound macadam).

 

In the US people often use "macadam" to indicate asphaltic bound material rather than the original style macadam roads which many here would call either dirt or gravel roads.

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Fellas, fellas!  FOCUS!  While I really enjoy the history lesson and find the origins of the word "tarmac" fascinating,  the problem at hand is the difference/s, if any, between the 241.6 cid 6 cyl of 1934 and the 241.5 cid 6 cyl of 1935 in the Chrylser line up.  What was behind the change?  Does anyone know or care to offer speculation?  It seems to me that Chrysler Corp was terribly inefficient with their part development/sharing during those depression years and I can't help wondering why.

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4 hours ago, Parrish said:

Fellas, fellas!  FOCUS!  While I really enjoy the history lesson and find the origins of the word "tarmac" fascinating,  the problem at hand is the difference/s, if any, between the 241.6 cid 6 cyl of 1934 and the 241.5 cid 6 cyl of 1935 in the Chrylser line up.  What was behind the change?  Does anyone know or care to offer speculation?  It seems to me that Chrysler Corp was terribly inefficient with their part development/sharing during those depression years and I can't help wondering why.

 

Have a look at my response to your buy / sell request

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