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Smoke cleared a bit and I saw this


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2 minutes ago, Rusty_OToole said:

55 Chev station wagon, looks like a low line with no chrome but was probably dechromed by the owner.

Oh right. The deliveries look like a van with no windows, right? 

 

Yes this has some mods but the paint was fantastic and I’m guessing the engine and suspension is not period correct either. 

Edited by victorialynn2 (see edit history)
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2 minutes ago, Rusty_OToole said:

That's right the sedan delivery had blank metal sides. There was also the little known delivery sedan, a stripped down 2 door sedan with a flat platform in place of the rear seat.

 

You're right about the blank metal sides, but I've never heard of a "delivery sedan".  "Sedan deliveries" had no rear seat, had bucket front seats and 4 door sedan front doors.  The rear door was hinged on the driver's side so that it opened toward the curb, making pickups and deliveries a bit safer, away from the traffic lanes.  Sedan deliveries had a single panel door with one hinge line, whereas, the often mis-identified panel deliveries had a two panel rear door with hinges on the outboard sides with a middle opening.  There are other differences, but those are the ones most easily identifiable from a casual glance.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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I have only seen one Chev delivery sedan, in a junkyard in Arkansas but it definitely existed. The junkyard owner told me it was bought new by the owner of a local grocery store to make deliveries. It was a black 55 sedan with no chrome and a flat platform covered with black rubber mat in place of the back seat.

 

I suppose it is possible that it was a home made modification, not a model sold by Chevrolet.

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Later......  Wikipedia turned up this information on the 55 Chevy 150 " The only body styles specific to the One-Fifty were decidedly fleet oriented — the sedan delivery (a 2-door wagon without rear windows and the rear seat removed) and the business sedan — a 2-door sedan with immobile rear windows and back seat removed. "

 

So, maybe the official name was business sedan.

 

More from Wikipedia

"The One-Fifty was mainly conceived as a fleet model and little effort was spent marketing it to the average car buyer of the day, although sales weren't limited to fleets. It was most popular with police, state governments, small businesses, economy-minded consumers and hot rodders. Chevrolet sold substantially fewer One-Fifties than Two-Tens or the Chevrolet Bel Air in every year of its life.

True to Chevrolet's vision, the 150 was no-frills basic transportation. It had limited options, stark trim, solid colors, plain heavy duty upholstery and rubberized flooring.[3] Small things like ashtrays, cigarette lighters and even mirrors were extra cost options. Compared to the mid-level Two-Ten or premium Bel Air models, the One-Fifty was stark and bland."
 

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Rusty_OToole said:

I have only seen one Chev delivery sedan, in a junkyard in Arkansas but it definitely existed. The junkyard owner told me it was bought new by the owner of a local grocery store to make deliveries. It was a black 55 sedan with no chrome and a flat platform covered with black rubber mat in place of the back seat.

 

I suppose it is possible that it was a home made modification, not a model sold by Chevrolet.

 

Rusty;

 

You've jogged loose the thread of a memory from what's left of my brane.  I remember that Chevrolet, and, I think, Ford (possibly others) produced what were called "Business Man's" coupes that had no rear seat.  These were used by traveling salesmen and the like, and I believe that many of them had no partition between what would have been the back seat area and the trunk.  These coupes had a lot of room for sales samples etc., and I believe that they could be ordered from Chevrolet that way ... pretty much like what you described in your Post #4 above.

 

Cheers,

Grog

Edited by capngrog
correct a typo (see edit history)
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9 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

That's right the sedan delivery had blank metal sides. There was also the little known delivery sedan, a stripped down 2 door sedan with a flat platform in place of the rear seat.

There were sedan deliveries made with windows also. I know of one in N. Dakota. It's a 1960 Chevy original highway dept. vehicle. Interior is all sedan delivery as is the exterior except for the glass instead of the blank metal sides.

 

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10 hours ago, victorialynn2 said:

I think this is a 55 Sedan Delivery? Custom for sure but I liked it and it could move pretty fast. 

3031070E-DCC8-48D0-A3E3-72B312E208B5.jpeg

Past AACA National Director Wayne Burgess has one of these he drives on all AACA Sentimental Tours.  It is a delivery version and he told me they made them with and without rear windows.  What I know about a Chevrolet you can put in a thimble though. :)

 

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The US government used sedan deliveries well into the 1970's.   They were station wagons with a factory-installed load platform instead of a rear seat.  I bought and sold several of them, with the newest being a '76 Plymouth small Fury (B-body).

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1 hour ago, George Smolinski said:

There were sedan deliveries made with windows also. I know of one in N. Dakota. It's a 1960 Chevy original highway dept. vehicle. Interior is all sedan delivery as is the exterior except for the glass instead of the blank metal sides.

 

  That's right and frequent poster on this forum Wayne Burgess has one.  A 56 Chevy seem often on

  the  AACA Founders & Sentimental Tours.   A red & white original not often seen these days.

 

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11 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

I have only seen one Chev delivery sedan, in a junkyard in Arkansas but it definitely existed. The junkyard owner told me it was bought new by the owner of a local grocery store to make deliveries. It was a black 55 sedan with no chrome and a flat platform covered with black rubber mat in place of the back seat.

 

I suppose it is possible that it was a home made modification, not a model sold by Chevrolet.

 A friend of mine owned one that was a salsmans car for Swift and company. No back seat, just a platform.

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Those business sedans were popular for travelling salesmen. Some had an opening into the trunk. My 88 Reatta has a flat platform behind the seat and a hatch into the trunk.

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1 hour ago, Paul Dobbin said:

  That's right and frequent poster on this forum Wayne Burgess has one.  A 56 Chevy seem often on

  the  AACA Founders & Sentimental Tours.   A red & white original not often seen these days.

 

 

I have one too, a 1947 Chevrolet Sedan Delivery, somewhat modified, but stock-looking on the outside.

 

Here's a link to information on the 1951 Chevrolet Business Coupe.  As you can see, it was a factory option.

 

https://51classicchevy.com/1951-chevrolet-styleline-business-coupe

 

Cheers,

Grog

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It has been modified some but it does look like it started as one. If you google 1955 Chevrolet Handyman many come up along with some original Chevrolet ads.

 

Its a nice car however it started. Thanks for posting the picture.

 

Dave

 

added link  https://55classicchevy.com/1955-chevrolet-station-wagons

Edited by Dave39MD (see edit history)
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17 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

Later......  Wikipedia turned up this information on the 55 Chevy 150 " The only body styles specific to the One-Fifty were decidedly fleet oriented — the sedan delivery (a 2-door wagon without rear windows and the rear seat removed) and the business sedan — a 2-door sedan with immobile rear windows and back seat removed. "

 

So, maybe the official name was business sedan.

 

More from Wikipedia

"The One-Fifty was mainly conceived as a fleet model and little effort was spent marketing it to the average car buyer of the day, although sales weren't limited to fleets. It was most popular with police, state governments, small businesses, economy-minded consumers and hot rodders. Chevrolet sold substantially fewer One-Fifties than Two-Tens or the Chevrolet Bel Air in every year of its life.

True to Chevrolet's vision, the 150 was no-frills basic transportation. It had limited options, stark trim, solid colors, plain heavy duty upholstery and rubberized flooring.[3] Small things like ashtrays, cigarette lighters and even mirrors were extra cost options. Compared to the mid-level Two-Ten or premium Bel Air models, the One-Fifty was stark and bland."
 

back in 1975, i was 19, i bought from the original owner (a house painter) a 1956 chevy 150 two door sedan, 235 six cylinder engine, standard 3 speed trans - no overdrive, no turn signals, no radio, no heater or defroster from chevrolet, he had gone to sears & roebucks to have a allstate  heater installed. i bought the car for $190.00, like previously said, no back seat, immobile rear side glass. white with a black n white interior.

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