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Anyone Here Install Their Own Glass?


GregLaR
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I plan to install my own glass and I'm looking for a little guidance here. I just received a full set of rubber for my car, from Andy Bernbaum Auto Parts, including all the window seals. My concern is the front, rear and rear quarter glass seals are all simply one cut length of rubber each. Which means there will be a seam somewhere on each window. The old seals I removed did not have a seam. They were a continuous piece that stretched over the glass and then fit into place. Is this just the way it is now and has anyone here had any experience with this type of install?

Thanks, Greg

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I hate to say it, but I would pay a glass guy to install the rubber. The seam will probably be at the bottom and will have to be sealed/glued. I would leave it to the professionals. Or....you could go to YouTube and probably come up with a video to watch on how to do it yourself.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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If the seals are available from steele I would return the ones from A.B. All I've seen are molded one piece. The few rubber moldings I bought from A.B. for my 56 Chrysler were not even close to useable. When I called them to talk about it I was berated, insulted and told to return them at my expense................Bob 

Edited by Bhigdog (see edit history)
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I have installed several windshields in 1960's Mustangs. The rubbers are always one piece. And they are reasonably easy to install.  My MGA's are a different matter, joins in the corners. They usually leak a little but the real leak is at the top of the windshield where the convert top latches down. On the highway in rain, water always seeps in.

 

Greg in Canada

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I broke 2 windshields trying to install them in my 1980 Chevy truck. Finally hired someone and he did the job in under 30 minutes.

 

There's skill involved. I didn't have it and didn't want to break more windshields trying to learn. 

 

Some things you're just better off paying for. Rebuilding automatic transmissions is another one.

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In the 1990s, I fitted new screens to my 1939 Studebaker Coupe Express, or at least a shop did. They used the strip moulding. It is crinkled in the corners now - the inside fibres have buckled under compression.

 

The problem is that when you bend something straight, the inside fibres must compress and the outside fibres must stretch, that is, compression in the inside and tension in the outside fibres. The one-piece jobs don't have that problem - there is no bending involved. The inside fibres are the smallest too - the lip on the outside of the 'screen - so are least resistant to buckling under compression. This problem might all go away with the glues of today......? I suppose one could stretch the rubber to remove the compression on the lip in the corners, but then it would be very difficult to stick the ends together at the join so they don't pull apart.

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I've decided to replace the rear window and windshield of my truck.   Actually a 60 foot tall Oak tree made the decision for me.   I live in the woods and I was working out in the back yard.  My truck was parked in the front yard.  It was a bright sunny day with a cloudless sky and no wind whatsoever.  I hear a crack and looked up to see which branch was about to fall.  Something that happens from time to time around here.    Unfortunately it was a HUGE branch about 60 feet directly above my pick up truck.   I watched it break off and fall directly on the roof of my truck.  There was nothing I could do but watch the rear window explode as the log crushed the roof of my truck.

 

So now I need to straighten the roof back up and replace both front and rear windows.  The good news is that all the side windows are just fine. ?

 

There's no way I'll pay to have this done.  In fact, I'm actually looking at buying another entire truck for $500 just to use the windows out of it.   Of course, I'll get that whole second truck as a parts truck too.   But yeah, replacing windows is on my agenda too thanks to Mrs. Oak Tree.   This just happened yesterday.

 

Roof.jpg.dd48fca8fff624b79d5a320b54e087cf.jpg

 

 

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35 minutes ago, RansomEli said:

I broke 2 windshields trying to install them in my 1980 Chevy truck. Finally hired someone and he did the job in under 30 minutes.

 

There's skill involved. I didn't have it and didn't want to break more windshields trying to learn. 

 

Some things you're just better off paying for. Rebuilding automatic transmissions is another one.

 

Well said, Ransom...

 

I had the windshield replaced on my 1972 Triumph TR6 around 1978 or so (owned it since new).  I bought the molding and replacement windshield from a very well known sportscar parts supplier.  It took about 5 minutes for me to back off and let a very good glass company here in Reading do the work.  They made me sign a disclaimer that if the windshield broke in their installation attempt that they would not  be responsible.

 

I highly agree with you to pay a few bucks more and let the professionals do it.  In my case they did a good job and that windshield is on the car today with no leaking to boot.

 

Regards,

 

Peter J.

Edited by Peter J.Heizmann (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, RansomEli said:

I broke 2 windshields trying to install them in my 1980 Chevy truck. Finally hired someone and he did the job in under 30 minutes.

 

There's skill involved. I didn't have it and didn't want to break more windshields trying to learn. 

 

Some things you're just better off paying for. Rebuilding automatic transmissions is another one.

 

There are some things you never learn until you do them.  I've replaced lots of windshields.  Yes, I broke the first one, which was back in the mid-70s when I was young and stupid.  No others in the 40 years since then. 

 

Oh, I've also rebuilt several automatic transmissions...

 

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I've replaced windshields in the past too.  And yes, I had problems with the first ones I installed.  Never broke one, but I did have problems trying to get them to seal completely.

 

What I've learned is that it requires a lot of patience.  For one thing lay the windshield in place first.   And if it isn't laying in really nice and even all the way around, then better get out the hammer and dollies and take car of that first.   No amount of trying to fit a new windshield into a bent window frame is going to work well no matter how professional the installer is.

 

So making sure the window frame is in pristine condition is paramount.  As you can see on my truck photo from my previous post, getting the window frame back into pristine shape is going to be my greatest challenge.   And there's no point in trying to fit a window into the frame until that task has been accomplished first.   It's certainly not going to fit the way it is right now. ?

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Appreciate all the input guys. I think I will return these and order the one piece seals.

I'm pretty "hands on" when it comes to repair/restoration work and my automotive background is strong enough I'm not really afraid to install this glass myself. Paying someone else to do it never entered my mind. I'm restoring this car myself. If I start paying someone to do it, I might as well pay them to do the whole thing. But that would rob me of the satisfaction of saying, when it's all finished, "I did that".

(I've rebuilt a few automatics too ?)

 

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I’ve done a few and the rope trick works well. I would see if you can find a you tube video of how to do it. It’s easy if you take your time, be patient and most importantly be sure you have the rubber placed properly. Have fun. 

Dave S 

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Excellent.                               Do see what steele rubber has to offer. Ive used a bunch of their products with great satisfaction. The only time i had a problem was a trunk gasket was short by a foot. A phone call was all it took to get a longer one sent. No charge and no need to return the short one........

Bob

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You might also want to check with Metro Moulded Products for your parts.  The weatherstripping I bought from Steele for my Impala was horrible, it barely came close to the originals on the car and there were several technical problems besides the fit.  The MMP parts needed some work to make them fit, but they eventually did and at least they seal.

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String and soap!

 

Watch and make sure the string does not start to cut the gasket. 

 

Pump in sealer after installation. Never could get dum dum strips to work right.....

 

And one of these tools. Well, after Googling for a 1/2 hour, I guess it is no longer sold. KD or Lisle made a great tool to work the rubber gasket. Had a flat end with a lip and the other end is a bent round probe with a small (1/8") ball on the end. Something to go under the gasket and help it into place over the pinch weld when the rope gets wonky.

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A lot of times I have had cars or parts for sale and people have always wanted to buy whatever I had for less. Instinctively I ask myself "What are they going to do with the savings?"

 

Greg, if you have bought things at a lower price than the seller asked, now is your chance to use the savings.

Bernie

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 I have replaced many windshields in my time but the one that got me pulling out my hair was a big monster one on a large motorhome.

 I finally called the manufacturer of the motorhome and he explained just how to do it.

 

 First, start the windshield in the grove on the bottom, 

 Then, ( I kid you not) take a bumper jack and place it on the dash and jack up the top until it fits!

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Greg.

I have bought some rubber over the yeas and will add that the stuff I get from Steele has the best quality.

Case in point, I got a simple fuel fill grommet for my 36 about 30 years ago and it looked like crap after a couple of years.

Ordered one from Steele and its been in place for about 25 years and still looks good.

These guys are easy to talk to and will go the extra mile. I even had to return a few pieces as I ordered the wrong items. This was at least after a year the buy that I figured that out.

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