Roger Walling

Classic car fraud scheme shut down

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2 hours ago, Roger Walling said:

 I'll buy it if you deliver it,

ps, the check is in the mail.

So is the bridge ..... 

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My mother was in her 80's with dementia when the local bank gave her a large 30 year loan on her home. She sent the money overseas by Western Union at $9,999.99 checks. Under 10 grand so it wasn't reported. Bank said they knew something was wrong but Heppa rules prevented them from sounding an alarm to us. She lost everything. They were never caught and our government sends millions of dollars in aid to the country they were from. Channel 2 news did a special about her problem ( and she was mad at us & embarrassed ) Keep a close eye on elderly friends and family, scammers are everywhere!

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When someone wants to sell me a high dollar item then It will be ME running the show. I don't NEED your Duesenberg or 56 Gullwing Mercedes at an amount that's not even six figures but apparently you NEED my money so here's how it's going to go down. If you don't meet every one of my requests the deals off. I will set up a bank account with the agreed upon price deposited into it and one that requires TWO ( yours and mine) signatures to make a withdrawal and must be made out at the tellers window only. In other words you are 100% assured the money is there. You will deliver the vehicle to my shop where it will be inspected, the title and numbers run, and workmanship examined. Then with the title in hand we will go to my bank and co-sign a check for the agreed amount and at which time the account will be closed. I have NEVER had a super deal show up in a truck or on a trailer.

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9 hours ago, mcdarrunt said:

When someone wants to sell me a high dollar item then It will be ME running the show. I don't NEED your Duesenberg or 56 Gullwing Mercedes at an amount that's not even six figures but apparently you NEED my money so here's how it's going to go down. If you don't meet every one of my requests the deals off. I will set up a bank account with the agreed upon price deposited into it and one that requires TWO ( yours and mine) signatures to make a withdrawal and must be made out at the tellers window only. In other words you are 100% assured the money is there. You will deliver the vehicle to my shop where it will be inspected, the title and numbers run, and workmanship examined. Then with the title in hand we will go to my bank and co-sign a check for the agreed amount and at which time the account will be closed. I have NEVER had a super deal show up in a truck or on a trailer.

 

 As a buyer, I would inspect the auto at the sellers address and would expect to be able to examine every part and to drive it.

 When satisfied, I would sign a sales agreement with the seller describing all concerns, agreed by both parties. 

A token deposit would be given and then the balance would be paid according to the sales agreement  upon the delivery of the auto. 

 

 A business deal is a two way deal, each being satisfied with their desires. 

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On ‎8‎/‎3‎/‎2018 at 9:52 PM, SC38DLS said:

I have bridge for sale ...........

Dave S 

WAY TO GO-----Old saying "If you can't beat 'em,  join 'em"

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I always heard "A fool and his money are soon parted" My question is how did the fool get the money in the 1st place?

 

I say if you really are stupid enough to purchase sight unseen a ridiculously low priced car from a photo, then you get what you deserve, your pocket picked. No sympathy here quit your crying and get on with it.

 

As for the so called professional collector car hustlers, buy an inexpensive "water mark" program to lay over the top of your photos so they can't be "stolen" and reproduced. The money you guys make hocking these cars certainly must give you enough profit to buy one. If your potential customer is really interested you can email photos directly.

 

just sayin'

 

brasscarguy

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I bought my project based on an ad on a make specific club web site, which had a link to some pics on Flickr. Copied and saved the pics. Went and inspected the car, bought it, got it home. Placed an ad for more parts needed to finish it on another club site. Got an email offering parts from same model being parted out. I said show me what you have. He sent me back one of the Flickr pics of what was now my own car!

https://i.imgur.com/c1NMwoU.jpg[/img]

jp 26 Rover 9

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On 8/3/2018 at 10:54 PM, Matt Harwood said:

If you're not smart enough to spot the con, it isn't the world's problem to solve for you.

I couldn't disagree more strongly. When the day comes that we can't trust each other civilization comes to an end. The more honest and trustworthy people are, the better society works. When that breaks down civilization breaks down with it.

 

Unfortunately the more trustworthy, and therefore the more trusting society is the easier it is for thieves and liars to take advantage. That is why it is so important to stamp out the crooks as soon as they pop up. Make sure the crooks know that crime does not pay and they will turn honest out of greed and selfishness. Let them get away with their scams and there is no end to it.

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Scams will never go away, as soon as one gets caught another one surfaces. I do have to agree with the others most of it is not based on innocence, but rather greed and stupidity in these car scams. 

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On ‎8‎/‎3‎/‎2018 at 10:24 PM, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Many countries seize assets of crooks under certain conditions,

and none of them "allow" fraud.  .

 

Sadly, the good ol' USA, via the Federal Bank Secrecy Act and the so-called crime of "structuring",  routinely seizes the assets of innocent citizens.

 

On ‎8‎/‎4‎/‎2018 at 1:35 PM, Tim Wolfe said:

My mother was in her 80's with dementia when the local bank gave her a large 30 year loan on her home. She sent the money overseas by Western Union at $9,999.99 checks. Under 10 grand so it wasn't reported.

 

That's a classic illustration of "structuring" and I'm surprised that the Feds didn't step in.  If the Feds had seized your mother's bank account, there would al least have been a chance of recovering its contents, but once it's overseas ...

 

What happened to your mother is a shame, and the bank was at the very least complicit in enabling the scheme.  I'm assuming that it was the bank that advised your mother to keep her transactions under the magic $10,000 threshold.

 

By the way, I'm not a lawyer, and I didn't sleep in a Holiday Inn Express last night, so my above comments should be taken accordingly.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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There is a surprisingly high incidence of honesty in American society.

Take the example of Ebay. A cynic would have expected the first seller to send junk to the first buyer, and the first buyer send a dud check to the first seller, and Ebay would be over in 5 minutes. That is not what happened. Ebay has thousands of sellers with a positive rating of 97% or higher. One reason is that Ebay and Paypal have strict rules to deal with complaints. But notice the vast majority are honest even though no one is looking over their shoulder. It never enters their head that they should rip someone off. I know there are exceptions, the point is they are exceptions, and rarer than you might expect.

 

Other countries are not so lucky. France for example. People over there expect others to scam them, and they scam others in return. Experts estimate that this produces a drag on the economy amounting to 30%. In other words if everyone was honest the GDP would jump 30% overnight. And France is far from the worst.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)

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15 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

There is a surprisingly high incidence of honesty in American society.

 

Very true, maybe not so surprising, though. You really have to go searching to find a truly criminal person. If you differentiate between justice and the law people are even better.

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xander I do not see a way to pm you you may want to change wording in the fraud posts I believe you meant conversation noy conservation

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Love it,:lol: Must conserve the conversation. Two, Too, To funny. I have to leave that one.:lol: Maybe I should read what I type before I post it.

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happy to see you took it in the spirit I meant.just that it went unnoticed so long?

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