Mike Macartney

REPORTS ON A 1914 HUMBERETTE RESTORATION

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19 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

How about using the center of another rotor with a couple of studs in it... then simply attach a handle.

Now that’s a good idea. Fast solution.

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Why didn't I think of that!

Sorry for the late reply, I have been 'out of the frame' and laid low for the last few days.

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Posted (edited)
Quote

From my maths class at school I seem to remember it is something to do with right angle triangles and female Indians! I could not quite remember the saying or how you spelt the name of the female native American, so I looked it up.

 

Mike do mean SOHCAHTOA?  (Sine=Opposite /Hypotenuse, Cosine =Adjacent /Hypotenuse and Tangent=Opposite /Adjacent)

We still teach it that way over here. In fact if you attend a Statics class that's one of the first things you find scratched  on tests and

papers students pass in.

 

Then there is:

  • Sailors Often Have Curly Auburn Hair Till Old Age.
  • Some Old Horses Can Always Hear Their Owners Approach.
  • Some Old Hen Caught Another Hen Taking One Away.

 

LOL

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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Now that one I remember as: -

 

Some People Have Curly Black Hair To Prevent Baldness

 

S = Sine, P = Perpendicular, H = Hypotenuse,  C = Cosine,  = Base,  T = Tangent

 

Different words with the same meaning.

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Mike, I’m just checking in to see how you are doing. The weather here is rainy, but don’t know about your neck of the woods. Have you been going to the shop and getting any work done?  Best wishes mike

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Hi Mike, I'm still here! At last, I seem to be getting some help from the medical people rather than just issuing me with antibiotics and steroids. I got a phone call on Friday requesting the pleasure of my company at the Doctors surgery for an 'inspection'. This was the first time away from the house since 23rd May when the 'lock down' in the UK started.The Dr thought maybe my very bad breathing maybe caused by a heart problem. Yesterday, I had a 45-minute 'video call' from the community Matron, which was a new experience!  The most annoying thing about it all is that I feel perfectly 'normal' when I am sitting down, but as soon as I get up and walk to the other side of the room I am fighting for breath.

 

Since my last post, with photos, on the 2nd May, over 2-weeks ago, I do have a few photos that I have not posted. Not very interesting I'm sorry to say. They are of the handle I was making, which is still not finished!

 

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Drilled and tapped for the drive pegs. Note the Albrecht keyless drill chuck which I picked up on eBay. I am really pleased with it.

 

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To hold the steel plate horizontal in the milling vice I needed 2-sides to be parallel. I set the plate up to machine the 'lumpy bit' off. To the left of the vice is my new machinists level another eBay purchase. I then sold my old one on eBay and got more for it than I paid for the new one!

 

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Probably, not the easiest way to cut the plate, but at least it gives me a bit more practise with the Bridgeport milling machine.

 

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That will do.

 

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When it came to the drilling and tapping, I was not able to do this myself, Jane helped me with the drilling tapping and screwing in the bolts. It's not much fun feeling useless!

 

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Normally, I would have used a 1.00 mm cutting disc on an angle grinder to cut the shape out of the steel plate. As using the milling machine controls was something I could do, I used the bolts to hold the plate up from vice, and milled around the cardboard template.

 

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Drilled holes for bolting the plate to a 3/4" square steel handle . . . .

 

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. . . . and tapped them.

 

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Not a pretty sight! Needs a lot more work.

 

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Coated it in marking out blue and marked around the cardboard template with a scriber. I could not see the scribe marks so I needed a plan B.

 

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Plan B was using a white pen around the template.

 

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I now have to wait until I have enough 'puff' to enable me to grind off the excess metal.

 

Dr phoned just now and told me that there is no problem with my heart, it is just my worn out lungs.

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My logical reaction would to take a good file and take the excess metal away with it! However, with your lungs the way they are, you effectively have to machine the lever.

It there a medicine available to recover your lungs next to a transplantation?

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Mike, your wife Jane sure is a trooper! Not only is she willing to take over from you when needed, she also does things that most other spouses wouldn't attempt! Does Jane have a mechanical background? Does she have a sister? ;)

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2 hours ago, r1lark said:

Mike, your wife Jane sure is a trooper! Not only is she willing to take over from you when needed, she also does things that most other spouses wouldn't attempt! Does Jane have a mechanical background? Does she have a sister? ;)

 

For real... I need me a Jane.

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r1lark and Jeff, I really loved your posts, they made me laugh and cheered me up no end. Jane and I don't think her sister would do the 'mechanical stuff' - Sorry 😊 Jane's mum was an artist and her dad an engineer. He had a small engineering company specialising in selling welding equipment and hard facing with Colmonoy and Stellite. During WWII they hard faced the arrester hooks for carrier borne aircraft. I am sure I have mentioned this before, Jane and I were in the same class at school from the age of 12 and started going out together when we were 16, we have known each other rather a long time.

 

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As it is now June and I have not posted anything since 20th May, I thought it was about time to add a little about what I have. or have not, managed to do. No progress on the Humberette, I am sad to say, but I have cheered up no end and have been selling a few bits and bobs on eBay, but also buying a few, what I think, are bargains. Now that we have some warmer weather here in the UK I have been testing myself with short walks up the vegetable garden. Jane and Fay put one of our garden benches up the end so I can sit and rest, to get my breath back before I venture back to the house. Early last week I could only get a third of the way before having to lean against the greenhouse water butt to regain my breath. This week I am actually managing to to get to the bench, at least that's a bit of progress. If I progress a bit further, I may even manage to do a little in the workshop, but I am not going to push it at present as it is rather depressing when you try and find you can't.

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Mike, we don't care how long you have been away, what you have done, or didn't do. We just happy to see you  here. When Jane is finished with the  Humbrette, can she come to New York? I have some projects I could use a hand with.  Stay well.Thanks, John

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I have been plucking up courage to write this post for a week now. I have been told that I now have months, rather than years left, before I pass away, due to my breathing difficulties. After chatting it over with Jane, we would like to find somebody to buy the Humberette who will continue the restoration and enjoy the car when it is finished. I have spent far more on the Humberette than it is worth and would be contented to sell the Humberette to a suitable person at a realist price. Of course all the details and photos of the restoration are documented here. I would like to thank all on this forum who have helped me. I could post a copy of spend spreadsheet if anybody would like to see it. Cheers for now, Mike.

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Hello John.  I am saddened to hear your news and to be honest, I really don't have the words; except to say if you can manage to stay focussed on your projects, then I believe it will help. 

 

Kind regards,  Ray.

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Mike -

 

I have read the forums for several years and have followed your restoration of the Humberette from the beginning, but I have never registered to comment on any of the posts.  Thank you for posting your work it has been very encouraging.  I have several projects that need a lot of work, so you have been an inspiration. I am sorry to hear of your prognosis. I will be praying for you and your family during the difficult days ahead.  I trust you are a man of faith and have the hope that comes with it.  If not, I trust you may become one. Thank you again for sharing your life and work.

 

Ron

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Mike, you have been, and always will be  a great inspiration for  all of us on the forum. Please know that we are praying for you and Jane. God Bless you and your family always. John

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Mike, l've learnt that the only certainty, is that their is no certainty. I have been diagnosed with terminal cancer, mesothelioma, it has no cure, however I'm in remission and it has disappeared. I have continued to make my future plans and lived my life daily as one normally would, ones attitude and approach has a huge influence on survival time. As my German relatives say- Hope dies last.💪

 

Go well

 

Lyndon

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Mike, I'm very sorry to learn that your health is not improving. Who knows, miracle can happen. I hope to read your comments for a long time.

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Thank you guys, your comments are very much appreciated, I am more frustrated than anything else. Not being able to accomplish anything that uses any physical work is so annoying. At least I still enjoy reading all your posts. Mike

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Posted (edited)

Hello Mike,

That is a devastating message. I am saddened to hear about your outlook and to be honest, I really don't have the words. The only thing I can do wishing you a lot of strength, and hope you enjoy our posts.

Best regards,

Harm

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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Mike, that's hits me hard... really sad to hear that.  It doesn't seem possible.  Hopefully the Doc got is wrong and you've plenty of time.  I can't fathom the emotions you guys must be running through.  I'm sending all my love and hope across the pond to you guys and hope it lifts you up. 

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Mike, I’ve been holding off posting trying to find the right words. So many others have posted the emotions and feelings we all share. I will add, many years back, I lost my dad when I was just 23. He was diagnosed with leukemia and was told he had 1-2 years maximum but he never complained and went about his life more worried about my mom and preparing us 4 kids to continue running the family business than he was for himself. He was just 47 when he was given that prognosis yet he lived 8 years longer, and those days, except for the last month, were full, happy, productive ones. So screw what the docs say, keep your head up, and your heart full. Continue as the mike we know as long as you’re up to it. We’re all in your corner and praying for you my friend.

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On 5/7/2020 at 6:23 PM, chistech said:

Now that’s a good idea. Fast solution.

 

Thanks Ted for your above comments and kind words. It maybe the wrong thing to say, but the length of life left, does not both me too much, It is the not being able to do anything that is so bloody frustrating. It is more or less like being bed ridden,. as soon as I move I am struggling for breath. Jane got me to start on my next lot of emergency steroids and antibiotics this morning after last night getting rather concerned at the battle I was having  in an attempt to breath.  It must have been 15 minutes before I could  even speak and the sweat had stopped dripping off me.. I hope they may help to at least help me gently walk up to the workshop, in a few days, to finish making that 'good idea for pegged spanner'  that Joe suggested. Cheers for now Mike

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Mike, I have been slow on the forum recently due to being too busy in general.  I am very sad to hear this news. 

 

Have faith in yourself, your abilities, and your strength, and fight this all the way thru.  A bad diagnosis is just another hurdle to jump over.  You can overcome this, just like you can overcome problems with the Humbrette.  Prove that doctor wrong.  Take your time, build more strength, and FIGHT it.  I'll be looking forward to your next post when you're out in the garage again, which I know will be shortly.  

 

Cheers!

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