Mike Macartney

REPORTS ON A 1914 HUMBERETTE RESTORATION

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Hmmm, even more thinking to do! Thanks Joe for the information. This afternoon I managed an hour in the workshop doing a little bit more cleaning up on the Bridgeport, that was enough for my lungs at the present time, at least that is better than the week before. Tomorrow, somebody is coming to put up some shelves in the workshop for me (I'm still not up to doing that myself yet). I need the shelf space for the things that came with the machines and somewhere to put the Humberette parts in a more organised fashion. I still keep buying machining stuff on eBay, so I'm not giving up the idea of still be able to do things in the workshop just yet.

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I'd think for the big end to use roller bearings, it would need a hardened insert, especially if rods were made form aluminum, wouldn't it? Even these aftermarket harley rods which are made of  4140H steel look to have something pressed in for the bearings to run on. And yes the rods are not necessarily tapered. These look straight.

rods.jpg

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Yes, definitely. If the rod was has hard as the insert for the bearing has to be it would be much too brittle. I'd bore the big rod to take one of the HD inserts - that way you would know that the bearing is more than adequate for the stresses involved.

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Hello Mike,

Since this is a low stress, low rpm motor  you have some options. 7068 T6511 aluminum would work very well for machined rods.

For cast rods I would go with A220 pearlitic malleable cast iron. You want it to be ductile as opposed to brittle. As Joe pointed out

you can alter the design to add extra strength where its needed as long as your clearances work out. If you go the cast route I would suggest

having the casting stress relieved. Tested for internal fractures might be good idea too.

 

either way, as others have stated with the needle roller bearings you would want a hardened insert for the outer race.

This could be a nice interference fit, pressed in than reamed to final size.

 

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Mike, I hope you are felling better. There are a few folks on this forum that have become a family of sorts, and you happen to be one of them. I hope that you get back out and about as quickly as possible. I love the work that you are doing on the Humberette. You are in my prayers for a full recovery. Thanks. John

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Hello John, thank you for your post, I am still here! I too have found that some of the guys on the this AACA forum have become good friends, without even meeting them!

 

Last Wednesday I had an appointment with the local surgery for the results of a blood test and a type 2 diabetes check up. I think they have moved the goal posts and now they reckon I am borderline type 2. I said to the nurse it is probably because I am eating too many biscuits (cookies) since I gave up smoking. Anyway, the nurse was not at all happy with my breathing and called in the doctor to have a good look at me, he was concerned at my shortness of breath especially as I had just finished a course of antibiotics and steroid tablets a couple of days before. They rang the acute medical unit at the hospital in Norwich and booked me in!

 

When I arrived two health care assistants, all done up in masks, gloves, etc. took me into a side room and told me to put on a mask. Apparently, a few minutes previously they had words from above, that anybody coming in with breathing problems was to be tested for Coronavirus and isolated. Being this pairs their first suspect, or should I say 'Guinea Pig', was not a lot of fun. Girl 'One' stuck a swab up my nostril as hard as she could, which made my eyes water. I also had another swab pushed down my throat. Girl 'Two' decided that the first girl hadn't done the nose swab properly and promptly stuck another swab up my other nostril as far as it would go! After being told to keep the mask on at all times, mentioned to them that having the mask on was making it even more difficult for me to breath and they said that I could pull it down to breath but make sure I had it on if anybody came into the room. After a few hours a hospital doctor came into to check me over, I told him that wearing the mask was a making my breathing even more difficult and he told me that there was no need to wear it as long as staff coming into the isolation room were wearing their masks, that was a relief.

 

Now to put things into perspective, to date, nobody in Norfolk has been found to have got the virus, so I was not overly concerned. Shortly, afterward a nurse came in and took blood and put me on a drip feed of antibiotics. I started rather enjoying my relaxing stay, in the peace and quiet, of this forced isolation, by Friday evening my breathing was a lot better and the doctor said I could go home. When eventually the staff nurse came with the discharge papers, I asked if they had had the results of the Coronavirus test, she said that they had heard nothing, but if I had the virus, she was sure that somebody would contact me!

 

Yesterday I managed about an hour and half in the workshop and this morning, I lasted nearly the whole morning before I started flagging. I actually feel much better now than I have done since before Christmas.

 

Now a question that one of you maybe able to help with. I bought some Evaporust, after seeing Jeff (1952 MG TD restoration) using it, I left some parts in it during the period I was in hospital and it has worked well in removing the rust from these items.

 

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All I did yesterday was take them out of the tank and dry them off. It has left a grey finish to the parts. Is there anything I should do to these parts?

 

Cleaning up the Bridgeport has been a lot longer job than I thought. I am pleased how it is cleaning up, but it is a slow process, I am just using strong liquid detergent with a brush and wiping it off with paper cloth as I don't want to use any aerosol products they may affect my breathing. After cleaning, I am spraying some WD40 onto a cloth and wiping that onto the bare metal surfaces to stop any rust starting.  

 

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Having been in a toolroom, it does not look as if the machine has been abused too much. I was impressed with the fairly unmarked state of the 48" table. Last Tuesday, as my breathing was so bad, my pal Robert kindly brought his nephew round to mine, to screw in some twin slot verticals for some more shelving, so that I can get more 'stuff' off the floor.

 

I am finding now that if I take things slowly, and don't 'rush', I can pace myself a bit more, and then I don't get quite so out of breath. After a lifetime of rushing about doing things this doesn't come easy.

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Well, I only can hope that the latest medication will help you. I would like to see that Humberette finished!

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After the Evapo-Rust, I generally use a blue scrubbing pad under running water to scrub that white film off.  It comes off easily and the parts look great.  Feel better.. your project looks great.  

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21 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

Well, I only can hope that the latest medication will help you. I would like to see that Humberette finished!

 

So would I Roger! I managed all morning in the workshop today, I cannot believe how much better my breathing is, still a bit out of breath but nothing like it was.

 

2 hours ago, Gary W said:

After the Evapo-Rust, I generally use a blue scrubbing pad under running water to scrub that white film off.

 

Thank you Gary for that, I will give it a go.

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The table of that mill is shockingly devoid of the usual scars!

 

jp

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Yes Joe, I think I am a lucky boy! I did wonder what I was going to find when I unbolted the vice and was very pleasantly surprised when I did. I will be even happier when I have finished cleaning the machines and can use them. By carrying out a proper clean up now I am learning more about them. If I don't do the cleaning now I never will! Mike

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Posted (edited)

Very glad to hear you're doing better Mike!!  Maybe the Coronavirus got them to take your breathing issues seriously... might be a good thing.  Also, as Gary said, you should be able to wash that gray (sometimes blacks) off with a scrubbing pad.  I usually use a wire brush right after I take it out followed by a shot of phosphoric acid (a BIG NO for you) or something to prevent flash rust.

Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Mike, you said they gave you a drip feed of some antibiotics at the hospital and now you feel much better. Possibly your body reacted better to whatever they gave you than what you were taking before. I’d ask and make a note of what it was as it sounds like it’s effect was almost immediate. Glad you’re feeling better.

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Hello Mike and Good Day.....

I hope this note finds all well with you and your family.  We are all having a bit of a diversion with this dang Coronavirus issue!  I guess it is good to stay home and dream of things to do!  How are you doing?  I have been a bit quiet as I have also had other background things I have been dealing with.  Are you going to have a set of custom Connecting rods built for you Humberette?  My two cents and opinion would be to head in that direction.  I am sure happy for you getting some upgrade shop equipment.  We can never have too many tools for what we like to do!

Regards and Keep you head down until this Pandemic runs its course!

Al

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Mike, I am glad your breathing is improving. Great news indeed!  Just take the proper precautions. We will  get through this. John

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Thanks for your thoughts. As I am one of those in the 'vulnerable group' (age and COPD) I have been told by our UK Government to be in isolation for 12-weeks. Living in the rural setting of Norfolk, with a large garden and a number of sheds, it is not really any great hardship for me. I am still trying to sort out the tooling and machines I bought which is keeping me out of mischief, but stopping me getting on with the Humberette. With the children now off school in the UK, I can foresee that the access to the internet maybe a problem, especially as we are at the far end of the telephone cables, my internet connection seems to be dropping out more than usual this morning. Below is a photo of the front page of our morning paper.

 

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I think Al is probably right with his comment "Keep you head down until this Pandemic runs its course!"

 

I think those of us with hobbies are the lucky ones. It must be rather boring for those without.

 

On the workshop front I have more or less finished cleaning up the Bridgeport and I checked the table level in relationship to the quill with a dial gauge.

 

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In two plains

 

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. . . . and I am pleased to say it was less than a thousandth of inch out.

 

I did make one cock up though; I refitted the vice to the milling table, fitted the dial gauge in the quill and checked the vice jaws to get them parallel to the table. I somehow managed to crank the table the wrong way, snapped the shaft of the dial gauge and buggered up the dial gauge. It was the only DTI I had with push button rear, so I am now waiting for a replacement.

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

You want to level the machine as well. In order to do that right, you will need a machinists level. I've also seen it done with a surveyor's transit but a level is probably a lot more practical.

 

I'll add that, if you don't have or can borrow a machinists lever, Moore & Wright were an excellent UK maker.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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Thanks for the tip Joe, I do have a machinists level, the problem will be trying to prise the bottom edge of the machine up off the concrete floor, it is sitting very flush with floor, I should have put something under it when it was first installed in the workshop.

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Glad your doing well Mike.  I too live on land and work from home so it's not very hard for me to stay away from others. I have plenty to do. There should be a notch in front of the mill base. You will need a big metal pry bar to lift it up some to add shims. 

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Thanks for that - I will go 'notch hunting' when I am in the workshop next.

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Posted (edited)

You will have to have some type of lip or stop at the end of the bar so it wont slip off. You wont have to go very high and keep your fingers away.

 

 

581624358_BridgestonemillromKetech.jpg.dbc3ddd00fd08d2e38e0e12d287ffde3.jpg

Edited by Laughing Coyote (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

You are supposed to use a "pinch bar" but any decent crowbar will work. I'd only lift it about 1/2". It might be a good idea to find four, 4" squares of wood to go under each corner. Then, depending on how far out it is you can use anything to true it up. The usual technique is to level it in one direction (left to right)...then level it in the other direction. Then check the first level and make smaller corrections. I've used slips of paper for the final adjustment.

 

It's amazing how much stress is relieved on the frame of the machine when it's level.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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Jvpuleo, would in it be better to use steel instead of wood?  Wood will expand and contract with temperature and humidity changes. Mike

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Yes, I think so. I've used 1/4" masonite as well but I doubt that the expansion of wood would make a difference unless Mike was making parts for supersonic jet fighters. They installed milling machines on ships and used them effectively so the level is more to relieve stress. Theoretically, it's not critical since the machine itself is square but I've found it was handy to have it level when setting up odd shaped parts...my exhaust manifold was one where I wanted to level it but there was no square edge on the underside to grip or the piece had to be held down with clamps. you might also want to raise one side a tiny bit in order to get a very slight taper...all that is easier if you can use the level to check it.

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Jvpuleo, I’m just thinking out loud sort of speaking. Metal does the same as wood, just not near as much. I do quite a lot of woodworking and have to take approbate measures to allow the wood to move. Even two pieces cut from the same piece will change at different rates. Masonite is more resin than wood and is more stable than wood. We do some shimming of pumps and such and alway use metal, plastic shims or construction grout. Mike

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