Mike Macartney

REPORTS ON A 1914 HUMBERETTE RESTORATION

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PUTTING IN THE GUIDE PIN FOR THE LATHE 5c COLLET ADAPTER

 

After marking the position of where the tapped hole needed to be, with an orange marker pen, I used a milling cutter to just scrape the surface where the orange mark had been. I then replaced the milling cutter holder for a small drill chuck, without moving the milling machine table . . . .

 

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. . . fitted a small centre drill and started a hole.

 

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Changed to a 2.5mm drill, my 2.6 drill seems to have gone missing, very strange, I'm sure I would have replaced it, had I broken it! I very carefully drilled the hole. At this last stage of making the spindle adapter for the lathe, I did not want to break a drill inside the hole. I had set the milling machine to its highest speed as I have broken small drills in the past with not having them rotate fast enough.

 

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Again without moving the mill table I fitted a M3 tap into the drill chuck and started the tap in the hole, by turning the drill chuck by hand. I then undid the chuck leaving the tap sticking out of the adapter.

 

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Fitted a tap wrench to the M3 tap and very, very, carefully turned it as far clockwise as it would go without too much pressure as this was the only M3 tap I had and I have been known to break small diameter taps in the past. I then backed it off and rotated it clockwise again. I found this operation very stressful and am happy to say that I did not break the tap!

 

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I was very relieved when the tap started to turn in the thread easily. I then unscrewed the tap . . . .

 

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. . . . screwed in the M3 grub screw until it touched the bottom of the groove in the collet and then backed it off a turn so the collet would slide in and out easily. Boy - was I pleased to have finished that 5c adapter. Before I finish making the other Morse taper adapter's, I'll have a break and make the knurled nuts to replace the odd castle nut and hose clip holding a couple of the gears on the lathe. I'm sure this machining will get easier the more I do. At present, I still find the machining quite nerve wracking, with so much concentration and a lot to think about.

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4 hours ago, Mike Macartney said:

I still find the machining quite nerve wracking, with so much concentration and a lot to think about.

I find it easier to write down my sequence of actions along with the measurements required. 'Else I will forget and get myself in a pickle, quickly.

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You do get better the more you do it but I'm not sure the anxiety goes away. It certainly doesn't for me but perhaps that is because once we start doing stuff like this you're always pushing the envelope and trying something a bit harder. I doubt either of us will live long enough to be completely comfortable with every job. Its 4:30 here and I'm a nervous wreck from the milling job I just finished. I'm happy with the way it turned out but all the time I'm doing it I'm wondering what will go wrong. I know men who have done this all their lives and are VERY good at it and they still get tense when it's down to the last few cuts and any error will ruin the part.

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6 hours ago, Mike Macartney said:

PUTTING IN THE GUIDE PIN FOR THE LATHE 5c COLLET ADAPTER

 

Changed to a 2.5mm drill, my 2.6 drill seems to have gone missing, very strange, I'm sure I would have replaced it, had I broken it!

The drilling hole: the nominal diameter x .8. For M3: 3 x 0.8 = 2.4 mm. With a 2.5mm drill, you were not that bad. In fact, you succeed! Remember, I'm using sometimes M 0.5 but into brass which is a material not as hard as steel. Anyway, when the tap get out without problem, I'm happy!

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Mike, great work on the Humberette. Very interesting restoration. John

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13 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

I find it easier to write down my sequence of actions along with the measurements required.

 

Thanks, that's a very useful tip. I will try it and not try and cut corners.

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12 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

You do get better the more you do it but I'm not sure the anxiety goes away. It certainly doesn't for me but perhaps that is because once we start doing stuff like this you're always pushing the envelope and trying something a bit harder.

 

At least I know it's not just me! Thanks for your post.

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12 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

I'm using sometimes M 0.5 but into brass which is a material not as hard as steel.

 

I just can't imagine using taps that small. I had enough problem just trying to find a M3 tap in my metric tap and die box and reading on the tap if it was the correct size. I at first picked up a M3.5 tap thinking it was an M3 tap!

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11 hours ago, John S. said:

Mike, great work on the Humberette. Very interesting restoration. John

 

Thanks John. I just wish I was able to get more done in a day before I need a rest.

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2 hours ago, Mike Macartney said:

 

At least I know it's not just me! Thanks for your post.

We’re currently working on the pedal pad mold for the Olds and we’re down to crunch time. I have to ship it overnight to my buddy so he can prepare the most, mix up the urethane, do the pour, give it enough time to cure, pull the mold apart, them if the sample is good, overnight it to me so I can install it in my car for Hershey. Joe leaves a week from today on Sunday from CO and I leave on the Wednesday of Hershey week so the mold has to be done and shipped this Tuesday morning. So, myself, my buddy who owns the machine shop, and his guy who’s programming the CNC along with doing the machining are all on edge because of the time we have, working with a piece that if screwed up, can never be duplicated in time, plus we’re working in reverse because it’s a mold. Even when you go over the drawings, check and recheck, you can’t help but worry you’ve possibly got things backwards. I really enjoy machining things out and watching things appear from raw pieces, even at the stages we’re at now with this mold and it’s out of my amateur hands, but I still can’t help being nervous. I believe it’s because of  personal commitment to do good work, and that subconscious drive to have it perfect, is what makes us worry. Of course, it’s the same reason why things come out so good. I think those who don’t worry much probably don’t do as good of level of work unless they’re so good, they could do it in their sleep!

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Had a bit of a shock on Sunday night, well actually 2am on Monday morning, I woke up having very extreme difficulty in breathing. I must admit I thought I was going to fall ‘off the perch’ and be a deceased parrot! I have been very short of breath in the past but nothing like this before. It felt like what I assume drowning feels like. Jane phoned for an ambulance. The nearest available ambulance was at Kings Lynn so they took nearly an hour to get here. I suppose that is one of the joys of living in a rural area!
 
The ambulance guys spent over an hour checking me out and giving me an ECG and two types of nebulisers. The guys were brilliant. We got to the Norfolk and Norwich hospital at about 5am and I was taken into the new triage portable building and checked out. They had built this unit after the bed blocking problems of last winter. At about 8am I was transferred to A&E, where I was to stay on a trolley until they eventually found me a bed on a ward at 8pm! It must be very frustrating for the doctors and nurses because after they have stabilised the ‘customers’ all they seem to do is look at the computer screens waiting for spare bed places to appear on the screen. Between about 6pm and 8am the ‘drunk and drugged up’ started arriving in A&E, presumably being brought in by the Police, mayhem erupted with them being very abusive to the staff (the ‘drunk & drugged – not the Police!)
 
On the ward during the night I had a couple of episodes of not being able to breath, the night staff sorted me out and gave me some tips on increasing my oxygen levels without having to resort to having oxygen.
 
At least one good thing has come out of this episode – I have packed up smoking, it frightened me that much! Each time I want a roll up, I try and think back to how I felt on Sunday night.
 
Now feeling a lot better and hope to start back in the workshop over the weekend.
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Thanks for your posts and good wishes. I am a lot better now than I have been for a long time. I did not realise how bad I had got. The problem is that the 'loss of lungs working' creeps up on you very slowly, getting a tiny bit worse each day, you just think it is old age creeping up on you. I am pleased to say I have managed to stay off the 'roll ups'. It will be a week of NO SMOKING in 2-hours time - not that I'm counting!

 

Spent a lot of yesterday in the workshop and again this morning. No progress on the Humberette yet, apart from what the coach trimmer has done. I hadn't chased him up because I did not need the body back yet. I hoped to have the fenders (wings) completed and a lot of the other bits finished before the coach trimming was finished - then the engine repairs got in the way!

 

Here are the photos, taken by Paul Moore, of the progress on the interior leather seats:-

 

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The work on the lathe went well, replacing the 'bodges' that were holding the gears in place.

 

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Made the tool that replicated the thread on the lathe gears.

 

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Checked the thread was correct with the only original knurled retaining nut.

 

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The new nuts and spacers fitted. There should have been more photos, but I forgot to take the camera up to the workshop!

 

This week the metal should arrive for making the drawbar for the 5C collets.

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Those look really good! I think you are progressing a lot faster than I did.

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23 hours ago, Mike Macartney said:

It will be a week of NO SMOKING

Good on you Mike.  Your lungs will thank you for it.  Nice work on the car.

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On ‎10‎/‎7‎/‎2019 at 4:50 PM, Laughing Coyote said:

 Your lungs will thank you for it.

 

They are thanking me already! I have not felt this well for over a year! I seem to be spending most of my time now in the workshop and not having enough time left to post the photos and reports! I'll try and catch up with the reports tomorrow.

 

Here is one photo of starting to make the knob that will screw onto the drawbar for the 5c collets in the lathe.

 

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Boring out to receive the BMW 3-series clutch release bearing.

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Mike,  I am glad that you have cleared out the breathing issue and are feeling better.  It must be rewarding to spend good time in the shop!

Al

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Thanks Al. Yes, funnily enough I seem to get more done now that I am in the workshop for longer. I suppose that is no surprize really! Today, has been the hardest day for not smoking. It will be two weeks next Sunday evening.

 

SWARF BRUSH

 

Here is a tip I picked up on the internet that has worked well for me.

 

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The brush on the right in the photo is the one I had been using. The brush on the left I have cut the bristles down and it works much better and does not get clogged up with swarf.

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Many years ago, my father was a strong smoker. While driving into the car from my sister, they had an accident. As a consequence, my father had difficulties to breathe. He stop smoking from one day to another.

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Continuing on with the machining of the drawbar for the 5c collets for my big lathe.

 

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I bored the end out to accept the thrust race that is going to push on the end of the gearbox end of the lathe headstock spindle.

 

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Once bored out to size the release bearing pushed into place.

 

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I think I need to make it look a bit 'prettier' and still need to thread the other end to screw onto the drawbar.

 

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The steel I have used is of unknown scrap material and seemed very hard on the outside. I was hoping to knurl the outside, but that maybe rather difficult.

 

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Perhaps if I mill some slots on the outside I could use this C-spanner to tighten it up onto the drawbar.

 

Following Joes advice I decided to make the ends of the drawbar out of EN1A steel and braze the ends into the seamless steel tube when the tube eventually arrives. When I checked the tracking number it has been at the local Hermes depot for a couple of days and not been collected by the delivery driver. Being the customer, rather than the sender, I can't seem to contact Hermes to find out what's happening. I have asked the sender to chase it up for me.

 

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I turned the bar down to the OD of the seamless tubing (1.5"). . . .

 

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. . . . and started cutting the 1.5" x 20 TPI thread.

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