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REPORTS ON A 1914 HUMBERETTE RESTORATION


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I managed to get out to the workshop sometimes, for short periods of time, last week and managed to 'have a play' on the lathe. I also tried out a very small bit of machining on the new milling machine for the first time. 

 

Continuing from my last post. Here is a photo of the spacer bush that I made for the 5c drawbar on the lathe.

 

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It is the part between the lathe spindle and the release bearing. I am pleased how it has turned out. This end of the drawbar now rotates virtually on its central axis rather than like a drunken sailor.

 

Being 'housebound' a lot of the time with my breathing problem, it has given my over active mind thinking time and ideas about little projects. I don't know if you remember that when I started using the 5C collets, instead of the chucks, I complained about the threaded chuck locking ring rattling about when a chuck was not fitted to the lathe. Well, I saw this on a shelf in my daughters second hand BMW parts shed.

 

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It is a used BMW 02 brake disc.  I wonder if I could make this fit the threaded ring on the lathe spindle?

 

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Jane helped me fit the chuck, I was then too puffed out to do anymore work that day. The next day I cut off the disc part . . . .

 

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 . . . and after doing some measuring I thought it may well work.

 

To be continued

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BMW 2002 brake disc mod continued.

 

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I measured the thread on one of the lathe chucks and found the thread was 4.5" 6 TPI 60 degree thread and cut the thread into the cast iron bell end of the brake disc. Standing there doing the machining is fine and I do not seem to get too out of breath.

 

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Not wanting to bother Jane, I took the chuck off by myself, knackered myself for doing any more work for the day apart from checking if the male thread fitted the female thread on the ring. It started but needed a bit more machined off it to screw on easily. It also needed the centre to be bored out. I decided that it would be good practise to machine the centre to fit the taper of the spindle.

 

Back in the house sitting thinking I thought I would try and design something simpler than previous method of finding and setting the angle spindle taped on the lathe. The: insulated lathe tool, car battery, bulb and bulb holder etc. was all a bit 'klunky' (not the right word or spelling, but it will do!).

 

I had bought from China one of those edge finders to use on the Bridgeport milling machine. It lights up and buzzes when it touches an edge (LED and Bleep). It had only cost £9.06 including the postage.

 

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I tried it between the tool post and the lathe spindle and it did 'light up and bleep'. Great, I'll try using that to get the angle correct for cutting the tapper.

 

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I gently tried it in one of my Dickson tool holders that had a V-groove in the bottom of it.

 

More to come later

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Can you get something to hang over the lathe that would hold the chuck?  I've been thinking about that for mine because they are heavy regardless of one's current health state.   At one point I had it on a "shelf" that was immediately behind and level with the back way.  I could roll the chuck off that shelf, on to a board that sat between the ways and the up on a 2x4 block to get even with the spindle.  Reverse the process to remove.  I think the hanging hook idea might be more trouble to get set up, but once you did it would be super easy.

 

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After reading the latest posts, my mind went into overdrive thinking of a solution. First, I’m no machinists. I can make things out of wood or metal, just not with the accuracy of a machinist. The first thing I thought of was a small jib crane that could move the jaw out of the way after it was removed. Second was to make a stand that you could put through the center and rest on the bed so it would be at the correct height for reinstalling when needed.  What do you all think?  Mike

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I must say that I am so appreciative of all your posts, especially at this present time with my health, it helps to keep me motivated. The last two days I have been 'confined to barracks' and unable to venture up to the workshop. I am planning to have a go this morning after I have finished this post. I have managed to keep busy with putting some engineering 'stuff' and some of my Zippo lighters, from my Zippo lighter collection, on eBay. Over the weekend I had a letter from the Pulmonary Rehabilitation department enclosing details on the exercises, to help with the breathing, as they are not running the courses at present, due to the coronavirus. I attempted to start them on Monday and was totally exhausted and unable to continue, after doing just the warm up exercises, I tried again yesterday and will keep trying to get past the 'warmup' and onto the 'proper' exercises.

 

Here are a few more photos of last weeks efforts.

 

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Adjusting the top slide to the correct angle is a bit fiddly, but this edge finder does make it so much easier.

 

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I forgot to mention that the edge finder did not come with a battery. That confused me, especially when an AA or AAA battery wouldn't fit. I then found some instructions on the internet and found it took an MN21 battery which cost £2.99 for two of them.

 

To cut the taper I needed the chuck back on, again Jane helped.

 

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She then kindly cleaned up the lathe and tidied away some of the tools I had used. It may help, if I move my tool cabinets nearer the lathe and mill, for the time being?  It was enough for me for that day. The next day I cut the taper and machine a little more off the thread. To be continued.

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Let me see if I can manage to finish posting last weeks work!

 

With the lathe cleaned up, the chuck back on the spindle and the angle for the taper set . . . .

 

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. . . . I could start machining the taper. This photo reminds me that I should make a space somewhere handy to put the spanners. I put them there when Jane cleared up the swarf and tools so, that she didn't put them in my tool box in the other corner of the workshop. I am having to think about things like that now to make the work easier for me.

 

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I used a telescopic bore gauge to check that I had bored the taper out enough. To actually check it on the spindle, the chuck will have to come off yet again! I'll get Jane to help me again tomorrow, to change the jaws in the chuck, so that I can turn the casting round the other way to grip it on the outside, to machine a little bit more off the thread. I will put the casting in tub of Envapo-rust overnight.

 

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That looks better being clean of rust. The wood and wedges are ready to assist with removing the 3-jaw chuck. I forgot to take photos of re machining the thread etc. If you look closely at the casting,  you will see a mark around the part, below where the holes are, this was a mistake!  When we changed the chuck jaws, Jane wound them in for me and tightened the chuck on the casting. What I should have said was - 'tighten the jaws up hard'. The casting spun in the chuck when I went to cut the thread  and came out of the chuck, luckily it did not do too much damage. Jane is doing very well for the first couple of days of her apprenticeship. :) 

 

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It fits, but I need to machine one of the holes into a slot so that the key on the spindle will go into the slot.

 

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Ready to use the milling machine for the first time since it was delivered. Exciting or worrying, I'm not sure? I not too happy about my clamping, but I could not think of another way of clamping it apart from bolting it down to the table and I don't have the 'puff' for that at present.

 

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I fed the table in very gradually, by hand, and it cut the slot easily.

 

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It fits, job done. Now I suppose I will have to make a spanner to remove it. :unsure:

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Boy, I really like that. I have two or three brake rotors on the floor of the shop that I've saved because they are a very good grade of cast iron but I've never been able to find anything to use them for. Of course, my lathe is much too old for your solution but I won't scrap them yet. Cheers...

 

JP

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Posted (edited)
On ‎4‎/‎29‎/‎2020 at 8:01 PM, Luv2Wrench said:

I'll never look at a brake rotor the same way again... :)   To think that I've thrown so many away!

 

On ‎4‎/‎30‎/‎2020 at 2:31 AM, JV Puleo said:

. . . .  I have two or three brake rotors on the floor of the shop that I've saved because they are a very good grade of cast iron . . . .

 

You have given me an idea for a book - "101 things to do with old brake rotors"

 

I still have the outside part of the rotor left. Perhaps I could make it into a halo for Jane! :)

 

Not managed much since last week but I have put some screws in the shelf above the lathe to hang the spanners I use on the lathe. It will be useful as long as I remember to put them back after I have used them.

 

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Seeing the photo above I think the top self needs a sort out!

 

Played with an idea for the peg spanner for undoing the cast iron part from the threaded ring.

 

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Perhaps I need something stronger than cardboard!  :)

Edited by Mike Macartney
moved a letter (see edit history)
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Another week comes to an end, not a lot to show for it, although I do have lots of ideas buzzing around in my head.

 

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I have not got much further with 'the spanner' for holding the 'anti-rattle' device for the lathe. I stuck the cardboard shape for the working end of the spanner onto some thick sheet steel. I then wondered if it was possible to mill around the cardboard shape? Normally, in the past, I would have just used the angle grinder to cut out the shape, but with my breathing problems I don't think that's a very good idea. I had a go with using the mill to just cutting a spare bit of plate off the end where the handle will fit. By moving the table traverse a few thou at a time and then the cross slide the same amount, I managed a 45o cut. If I machine the plate, by this method, it will be rather laborious but maybe successful?

 

I found a couple of 5/16 UNF bolts, that I can cut the heads off to use as the pegs in the spanner. Studying the photo I think it will be best if I drill and tap the two holes for the pegs first. I can then machine the heads off the screws, in the lathe, and screw them into the plate. The plate can then be held more securely the vice by clamping the 'sticky out' bits of bolt.

 

I now need to work out the distance between centres of the two bolt holes. From my maths class at school I seem to remember it is something to do with right angle triangles and female Indians! I could not quite remember the saying or how you spelt the name of the female native American, so I looked it up. To my great surprise, it said, 'Contemporary use of the term, especially by non-Natives, is considered offensive, derogatory, misogynist and racist'. :huh: So I had to rethink the mnemonic or use an online calculator which was a lot easier than working out squares and square roots!

 

With the Bridgeport came these two draws, one with Imperial 5C collets and the other with Metric collets.

 

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As I had bought some new and secondhand 5C collets on eBay, previous to buying the Bridgeport, I had a sort them out to see what makes and sizes I had two or more of and found that this lot, in the next, photo are the duplicates I have.

 

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Under the paper are imperial and above the paper are metric, that are all spares. I attempted to list the spare collets by pasting an Excel spreadsheet, just in case any of the followers of my restoration 'blog' needed any, it didn't work and the bit that did paste, won't delete. :wacko: 

 

  METRIC  
SIZE MAKE CONDITION
3.0 NN GOOD
4.0 NN GOOD
 

 

 

So if there are any 5C collets you are short of just let me know.

 

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I think I am going to mount some of this 4" x 1.5" aluminium box section, on shelf brackets, behind the lathe and drill holes in it for tool post tools, and brackets to fit my Dickson tool holders. At least it will give me a bit more experience with using the mill. I have not used the DRO yet as I still need to learn how to use it. I don't have a manual for it and I have not seen any information on this make and model on the internet.

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Mike, I came here after reading all of JV Puleo's thread for the 1910 Mitchell, and seeing your posts there.  I'll be doing the same thing here - starting at your first post, and catching up!

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19 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

How about using the center of another rotor with a couple of studs in it... then simply attach a handle.

Now that’s a good idea. Fast solution.

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Posted (edited)
Quote

From my maths class at school I seem to remember it is something to do with right angle triangles and female Indians! I could not quite remember the saying or how you spelt the name of the female native American, so I looked it up.

 

Mike do mean SOHCAHTOA?  (Sine=Opposite /Hypotenuse, Cosine =Adjacent /Hypotenuse and Tangent=Opposite /Adjacent)

We still teach it that way over here. In fact if you attend a Statics class that's one of the first things you find scratched  on tests and

papers students pass in.

 

Then there is:

  • Sailors Often Have Curly Auburn Hair Till Old Age.
  • Some Old Horses Can Always Hear Their Owners Approach.
  • Some Old Hen Caught Another Hen Taking One Away.

 

LOL

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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Now that one I remember as: -

 

Some People Have Curly Black Hair To Prevent Baldness

 

S = Sine, P = Perpendicular, H = Hypotenuse,  C = Cosine,  = Base,  T = Tangent

 

Different words with the same meaning.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Mike, I'm still here! At last, I seem to be getting some help from the medical people rather than just issuing me with antibiotics and steroids. I got a phone call on Friday requesting the pleasure of my company at the Doctors surgery for an 'inspection'. This was the first time away from the house since 23rd May when the 'lock down' in the UK started.The Dr thought maybe my very bad breathing maybe caused by a heart problem. Yesterday, I had a 45-minute 'video call' from the community Matron, which was a new experience!  The most annoying thing about it all is that I feel perfectly 'normal' when I am sitting down, but as soon as I get up and walk to the other side of the room I am fighting for breath.

 

Since my last post, with photos, on the 2nd May, over 2-weeks ago, I do have a few photos that I have not posted. Not very interesting I'm sorry to say. They are of the handle I was making, which is still not finished!

 

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Drilled and tapped for the drive pegs. Note the Albrecht keyless drill chuck which I picked up on eBay. I am really pleased with it.

 

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To hold the steel plate horizontal in the milling vice I needed 2-sides to be parallel. I set the plate up to machine the 'lumpy bit' off. To the left of the vice is my new machinists level another eBay purchase. I then sold my old one on eBay and got more for it than I paid for the new one!

 

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Probably, not the easiest way to cut the plate, but at least it gives me a bit more practise with the Bridgeport milling machine.

 

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That will do.

 

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When it came to the drilling and tapping, I was not able to do this myself, Jane helped me with the drilling tapping and screwing in the bolts. It's not much fun feeling useless!

 

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Normally, I would have used a 1.00 mm cutting disc on an angle grinder to cut the shape out of the steel plate. As using the milling machine controls was something I could do, I used the bolts to hold the plate up from vice, and milled around the cardboard template.

 

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Drilled holes for bolting the plate to a 3/4" square steel handle . . . .

 

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. . . . and tapped them.

 

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Not a pretty sight! Needs a lot more work.

 

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Coated it in marking out blue and marked around the cardboard template with a scriber. I could not see the scribe marks so I needed a plan B.

 

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Plan B was using a white pen around the template.

 

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I now have to wait until I have enough 'puff' to enable me to grind off the excess metal.

 

Dr phoned just now and told me that there is no problem with my heart, it is just my worn out lungs.

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My logical reaction would to take a good file and take the excess metal away with it! However, with your lungs the way they are, you effectively have to machine the lever.

It there a medicine available to recover your lungs next to a transplantation?

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Mike, your wife Jane sure is a trooper! Not only is she willing to take over from you when needed, she also does things that most other spouses wouldn't attempt! Does Jane have a mechanical background? Does she have a sister? ;)

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2 hours ago, r1lark said:

Mike, your wife Jane sure is a trooper! Not only is she willing to take over from you when needed, she also does things that most other spouses wouldn't attempt! Does Jane have a mechanical background? Does she have a sister? ;)

 

For real... I need me a Jane.

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r1lark and Jeff, I really loved your posts, they made me laugh and cheered me up no end. Jane and I don't think her sister would do the 'mechanical stuff' - Sorry 😊 Jane's mum was an artist and her dad an engineer. He had a small engineering company specialising in selling welding equipment and hard facing with Colmonoy and Stellite. During WWII they hard faced the arrester hooks for carrier borne aircraft. I am sure I have mentioned this before, Jane and I were in the same class at school from the age of 12 and started going out together when we were 16, we have known each other rather a long time.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

As it is now June and I have not posted anything since 20th May, I thought it was about time to add a little about what I have. or have not, managed to do. No progress on the Humberette, I am sad to say, but I have cheered up no end and have been selling a few bits and bobs on eBay, but also buying a few, what I think, are bargains. Now that we have some warmer weather here in the UK I have been testing myself with short walks up the vegetable garden. Jane and Fay put one of our garden benches up the end so I can sit and rest, to get my breath back before I venture back to the house. Early last week I could only get a third of the way before having to lean against the greenhouse water butt to regain my breath. This week I am actually managing to to get to the bench, at least that's a bit of progress. If I progress a bit further, I may even manage to do a little in the workshop, but I am not going to push it at present as it is rather depressing when you try and find you can't.

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Mike, we don't care how long you have been away, what you have done, or didn't do. We just happy to see you  here. When Jane is finished with the  Humbrette, can she come to New York? I have some projects I could use a hand with.  Stay well.Thanks, John

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have been plucking up courage to write this post for a week now. I have been told that I now have months, rather than years left, before I pass away, due to my breathing difficulties. After chatting it over with Jane, we would like to find somebody to buy the Humberette who will continue the restoration and enjoy the car when it is finished. I have spent far more on the Humberette than it is worth and would be contented to sell the Humberette to a suitable person at a realist price. Of course all the details and photos of the restoration are documented here. I would like to thank all on this forum who have helped me. I could post a copy of spend spreadsheet if anybody would like to see it. Cheers for now, Mike.

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Hello John.  I am saddened to hear your news and to be honest, I really don't have the words; except to say if you can manage to stay focussed on your projects, then I believe it will help. 

 

Kind regards,  Ray.

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Mike -

 

I have read the forums for several years and have followed your restoration of the Humberette from the beginning, but I have never registered to comment on any of the posts.  Thank you for posting your work it has been very encouraging.  I have several projects that need a lot of work, so you have been an inspiration. I am sorry to hear of your prognosis. I will be praying for you and your family during the difficult days ahead.  I trust you are a man of faith and have the hope that comes with it.  If not, I trust you may become one. Thank you again for sharing your life and work.

 

Ron

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Mike, you have been, and always will be  a great inspiration for  all of us on the forum. Please know that we are praying for you and Jane. God Bless you and your family always. John

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Mike, l've learnt that the only certainty, is that their is no certainty. I have been diagnosed with terminal cancer, mesothelioma, it has no cure, however I'm in remission and it has disappeared. I have continued to make my future plans and lived my life daily as one normally would, ones attitude and approach has a huge influence on survival time. As my German relatives say- Hope dies last.💪

 

Go well

 

Lyndon

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Thank you guys, your comments are very much appreciated, I am more frustrated than anything else. Not being able to accomplish anything that uses any physical work is so annoying. At least I still enjoy reading all your posts. Mike

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Hello Mike,

That is a devastating message. I am saddened to hear about your outlook and to be honest, I really don't have the words. The only thing I can do wishing you a lot of strength, and hope you enjoy our posts.

Best regards,

Harm

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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Mike, that's hits me hard... really sad to hear that.  It doesn't seem possible.  Hopefully the Doc got is wrong and you've plenty of time.  I can't fathom the emotions you guys must be running through.  I'm sending all my love and hope across the pond to you guys and hope it lifts you up. 

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Mike, I’ve been holding off posting trying to find the right words. So many others have posted the emotions and feelings we all share. I will add, many years back, I lost my dad when I was just 23. He was diagnosed with leukemia and was told he had 1-2 years maximum but he never complained and went about his life more worried about my mom and preparing us 4 kids to continue running the family business than he was for himself. He was just 47 when he was given that prognosis yet he lived 8 years longer, and those days, except for the last month, were full, happy, productive ones. So screw what the docs say, keep your head up, and your heart full. Continue as the mike we know as long as you’re up to it. We’re all in your corner and praying for you my friend.

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On 5/7/2020 at 6:23 PM, chistech said:

Now that’s a good idea. Fast solution.

 

Thanks Ted for your above comments and kind words. It maybe the wrong thing to say, but the length of life left, does not both me too much, It is the not being able to do anything that is so bloody frustrating. It is more or less like being bed ridden,. as soon as I move I am struggling for breath. Jane got me to start on my next lot of emergency steroids and antibiotics this morning after last night getting rather concerned at the battle I was having  in an attempt to breath.  It must have been 15 minutes before I could  even speak and the sweat had stopped dripping off me.. I hope they may help to at least help me gently walk up to the workshop, in a few days, to finish making that 'good idea for pegged spanner'  that Joe suggested. Cheers for now Mike

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Mike, I have been slow on the forum recently due to being too busy in general.  I am very sad to hear this news. 

 

Have faith in yourself, your abilities, and your strength, and fight this all the way thru.  A bad diagnosis is just another hurdle to jump over.  You can overcome this, just like you can overcome problems with the Humbrette.  Prove that doctor wrong.  Take your time, build more strength, and FIGHT it.  I'll be looking forward to your next post when you're out in the garage again, which I know will be shortly.  

 

Cheers!

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