Mike Macartney

REPORTS ON A 1914 HUMBERETTE RESTORATION

Recommended Posts

Well I read them, I just don't have a lot to add. Keep it up! :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Keiser31 and Bloo, I think I must have been feeling a bit down when I wrote my comment. When you are mainly working on your own, you can feel a bit isolated. It's great with this forum to have guys out there that you can 'bounce' ideas with.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m reading and following also. My usual thoughts are “I wish I could do that” or “ That’s a skill I need to learn” or simply “WOW!”

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

YES - YOU CAN DO IT!

 

It is a lot easier nowadays, than it used to be, in that you can look 'stuff' up on the internet. Whereas, when I started 'playing' with cars in the 1960's it was more difficult as you had to get books out from the library to learn 'stuff'. Now, you can even find videos on U-tube on how to do 'stuff'. All you need is a positive mental attitude (PMA). Which means; a philosophy of having an optimistic disposition in every situation.

 

The reason for me doing these restoration reports is to try and help others who are starting out on restorations and/or get others interested in working on old cars. It can be an interesting and rewarding hobby.

 

I started out being interested in cars in the 1960's. The majority of what I have learnt so far, I say 'so far', as you are never too old to learn, is self taught, having acquired knowledge or skill on one's own initiative rather than through formal instruction or training. I've made mistakes on the way, but you can learn a lot from your mistakes.

 

If anybody is interested, I can write a brief summary of my hobby and work experience over the years, if it would be any help to others.

 

Here is a little bit that is on the Jaymic website, that my daughter wrote, when she took over the parts side of the business, 14-years ago when I retired.

https://www.jaymic.com/about

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

ADDING EXTRA SUPPORT BRACKETS FOR THE EXHAUST DOWN PIPES RATHER THAN JUST THE EXHAUST FLANGES.

 

Now the Humberette body is waiting on the coach trimmer to let me know when he requires it, I believe he is just finishing off upholstery work on a Jaguar, my attention has turned towards the chassis and engine. Before I remove the engine I want to make the brackets to support the exhaust downpipes on the bell housing rather than all the strain going through the 2-bolt exhaust flanges as there are only exhaust mountings on the silencer (muffler) and tail pipe. This was an idea given to me by Joe Puleo who is posting the work on his 1910 Mitchell on this AACA forum. His work is well worth following if you haven't seen his posts. Over the last couple of months I have been thinking on and off how to hold the exhaust pipe, in a reasonably 'vintage way' to the bell housing bolts.

 

The first thing I did was make a cardboard pattern of the 'space' between 2-bell housing bolt/crankcase holes and the exhaust downpipe.

 

1505.thumb.jpg.651f1320937ae5aab727fca7837b6d18.jpg

 

I marked around the cardboard pattern onto 3mm (1/8") mild steel plate with a black marker pen. I will cut the shape out later once I have made the other parts. At first I thought of making the exhaust clamps out of exhaust pipe of a larger diameter that would just fit over the diameter of the downpipe, but gave up on this idea because I felt the clamp would be too flimsy. The next idea was using a exhaust U-clamp, the problem with this idea was the bracket from the bellhousing would need to be twisted as the angle of the downpipe is not at right angles to the bellhousing to crankcase join. I decided in the end to make the clamps from scrap round bar and 1/8" x 3/4" mild steel bar.

 

1395.thumb.jpg.0e3c85b251085076956765c4c209b2b7.jpg

 

Boring out the solid bar to the outside diameter of the exhaust downpipe.

 

1405.thumb.jpg.22239aad244f0de8df01ebc33b817655.jpg

 

Machining the outside diameter to give the 'clamp' an 1/8" wall thickness.

 

1406.thumb.jpg.d597cee4ff57de2f5f9e787b36526515.jpg

 

About to cut the tube off with a parting tool. Before I did this, I used the lathe parting tool, to mark a line down the outside of the tube, you can see the line just above the tool.

 

1407.thumb.jpg.8d7fcd5085d4d66b3fa80f87e5221cb9.jpg

 

Splitting the bit of tube into two halves.

 

1409.thumb.jpg.9caa05721fa0e0822b6853dda715cf5f.jpg

 

I tidied the ends up in the lathe. Now I need to cut each tube in half to make the clamp.

Edited by Mike Macartney
spelling (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With one side of the 'ring' marked with a line for cutting I now needed to try and think of a way to scribe a cut line 180 degrees away from my original line.

 

1410.thumb.jpg.e06c9900ed4819319b37c98757192a72.jpg

 

I drew some concentric circles with a vertical centre line in my book and centred the tube on the circles. I then marked the opposite side, turned the tube over and marked the other edge. I could then scribe the other cut line.

 

1478.thumb.jpg.83a8bba3730ada6c13f9df85ba1c3c75.jpg

 

The tube cut nicely with the 1mm cutting disc in the angle grinder.

 

1477.thumb.jpg.984fca6dc981b478f6b3f34d77adfa3a.jpg

 

Now for the lugs for the clamps. I should have used some marking out blue, this was up in the other shed and I was too lazy to go and get it!

 

1480.thumb.jpg.6ad7ea75fdf99e45b204f4443f823ac7.jpg

 

The four lugs where bolted together. . . .

 

1481.thumb.jpg.260fc17bd1bc396bc6dba1fec2c7d01c.jpg

 

The sides and corners machined in the milling machine and finished off on the linisher.

 

1482.thumb.jpg.131db06595351a883d5d14f9425aa781.jpg

 

I marked up the ends and the tube bits with a felt pen so I did not get them muddled up.

 

1483.thumb.jpg.c2ec8728a1dea5527b184687e11c8f3c.jpg

 

I made a small jig to hold the parts together in the correct place while I tack welded the bits together (thanks jp for getting me into jigs!). Notice the Vee'd out grooves for the weld to go into.

 

1484.thumb.jpg.e452df1f4bf311218626fdad89589472.jpg

 

After grinding the excess weld off the first clamp I used the this as a 'jig' for tack welding the second half together.

 

1485.thumb.jpg.b46294e5c560977630ce26ae36550a3e.jpg

 

I would like to lay a weld on the outside joint. The problem is I want it to look neat and don't want it to get in the way of the bolt head. I will have a practise first with a couple of bits of scrap 1/8" plate to get the settings correct on the welder before I try it for real.

 

1486.thumb.jpg.c6b1561faffdeba33674ffb015c97b3c.jpg

 

I checked the clamp fitted and checked it would fit my cardboard pattern for the bell housing bracket. Next job; make the clamp for the other side exhaust downpipe and cut the 1/8" thick plate out for the piece from the bell housing to the clamp.

 

 

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After making the first exhaust clamp I set out making the second clamp. I won't bore you with the same details, just the things I forgot to mention in my last post.

 

1489.thumb.jpg.ba1b96300c95711359eaab6016bca566.jpg

 

This time I decided to bolt the 'flanges' to the jig first, to mark them, before cutting them to the correct length.

 

1490.thumb.jpg.665f1b3fcd8095f48a98ca5b0fc44437.jpg

 

Showing the flanges welded on, before grinding off the excess with a coarse flap disc, attached to an angle grinder.

 

1491.thumb.jpg.fe9c147bdb7f3ccb6b51ef14f0def95b.jpg

 

. . . . as well as grinding the sides . . .

 

1492.thumb.jpg.f5eca9f8f778e269c72b7f2cc0f5b52f.jpg

 

. . . .  and finishing off on the linisher.

 

1493.thumb.jpg.db27b9e986baea2450e3d2089698513f.jpg

 

The flanges bolted to the jig and set parallel before tightening the bolts. At this stage the holes in the flanges are smaller than the sizes they will be.

 

1495.thumb.jpg.0c5dc3e4e8d5e9c16351bf2e289b93b6.jpg

 

I looked everywhere on, and under the bench for the nut for the second set screw! 'Muggins' here had screwed two nuts onto one set screw - you just can't help some people!

 

1498.thumb.jpg.c885a069a6f81a1fa93e7250de662d52.jpg

 

The top half of the clamp has a clearance hole for the M6 set screw and the bottom half is threaded. My idea is to also have a nut to lock the bolt in place when the bolt is tight I will have a bit of tidying up to do on these clamps, but I am waiting on, or putting off welding the joint adjacent to the bolt head. I haven't got the confidence today, that I can do a decent looking weld. The problem is that if I do a crap weld it is difficult to grind the weld off in the position it is - so let's have a go at cutting the plate out. . . .

 

1501.thumb.jpg.f74235a61d5fb5629ac7e0abf893482c.jpg

 

I clamped the 1/8" sheet to the bench and started cutting out the plate, that will connect the clamp to the bellhousing, I used a 1mm cutting disc in the angle grinder.

 

1502.thumb.jpg.c7c8030b6c3a73fd03f83ef8a99e3ef1.jpg

 

Well that's it roughed out, now to get rid of the 'sharks teeth'. I used the bench grinder to clean up the edges, finishing off with the flap disc in the angle grinder.

 

1504.thumb.jpg.dcf800aba76bc4f06c51a2a55d715f95.jpg

 

It looks more or less like the cardboard pattern. Presumably, I could have used the milling machine to cut this shape out. When I have tried doing this in the past I have found it difficult to work out which way to turn the handles on the milling table and ended up in a muddle by turning a handle the wrong way, messing the job up by cutting into the bit of metal I wanted to keep whole! Next job is to make sure the holes are put in the correct places to line up with the bell housing bolts.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I like it. It makes me think I ought to learn how to weld one of these days. I actually have gas, stick and mig welding equipment - none of it new or particularly good. I inherited the mig welder and have never touched it but maybe I should. I think I'd have done the small radius with a milling cutter... you an mount a horizontal side-milling cutter in a vertical mill with a stub arbor and mill down... it will give you a radius the diameter of the cutter.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get a friend who can weld to have a look at the MIG welder, that you have, to see if he can get it working, they can then show you the basics of MIG welding with your machine. They say it's as easy as using a glue gun. Not having ever used a glue gun I can't say!

 

I need to think about using my milling machine more. Thanks for the tip. The smaller radius is not round as it fits the clamp at an angle as will be seen in my next post. Using a side horizontal milling cutter would have machined most of the metal away and saved a lot of grinding. Next time I have a shaped plate to make I'll have a go with the mill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With the plate cut out for the exhaust downpipe bracket I needed to think how I was going to make sure the holes for the bolts in the bellhousing lined up.

 

1509.thumb.jpg.d09c0e96214b99ffe8117ef6b5594428.jpg

 

I traced around my cardboard pattern, into my note book, and marked the dimensions I needed to measure. Although Humber used a number of metric thread nuts and bolts, I was sure that most of the engineering measurements would be in Imperial. At first I used my Vernier caliper to measure the distances between the outside and inside of the two threaded studs that were sticking out on the bellhousing side. This proved a bit too accurate, so I used a 6" steel rule to check my Vernier caliper measurements and came to the conclusion that the distance between the centres of these studs was 3-7/8".

 

1506.thumb.jpg.331e8f1dc6bd865c8947377169e7ca21.jpg

 

I centre punched the position of the first hole, then used my spring type divider caliper set at 3-7/8" to mark a possible position for the second hole. I chose what I thought was the best position for the second hole and punched the centre for that hole with a entre punch. Clamped the plate to the drill bench table and drilled pilot holes first, before drilling clearance holes for the 7/16" diameter studs.

 

1507.thumb.jpg.c70bddd797aed99bd271d17d7e8d68db.jpg

 

Now to see if it fits on the bellhousing?

 

1510.thumb.jpg.fcbf7df530d70119bf1649810d86c26e.jpg

 

I don't know whether it was more by luck than judgment - the plate actually fitted over the studs perfectly, without having to make the holes larger.

 

1511.thumb.jpg.b885615bfff53c6aab938424600370f8.jpg

 

When all the bolts were tightened up and everything was where is should be, I tack welded the plate to the clamp.

 

1512.thumb.jpg.d3564d160defe09e4537b75f06981de0.jpg

 

Then removed the part to the bench and welded the clamp to the plate. Removed the complete bracket from the bellhousing and exhaust downpipe, blasted it in the cabinet to clean it, then replaced it on the car. I will paint it when I paint the rest of the exhaust parts with high temperature black exhaust paint. Now to make the bracket and clamp for the right hand exhaust downpipe. I would like to make a similar bracket on the right hand side of the car.

1513.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since I bought the Humberette last June, I have been looking for a period mirror, at a reasonable price, new ones seemed to be very expensive and good second hand ones seem few and far between.

 

This one turned up on eBay and I bought it.

 

1521.thumb.jpg.cf8e25f3eb63ae29aedf1f809e5a363f.jpg

 

1520.thumb.jpg.5d1ac7195515786c827929cfe907de0d.jpg

 

The mounting bracket leaves a lot to be desired, but at least the mirror head is in reasonable condition. I can make a new mounting bracket in brass or steel to screw it to the wooden windshield support. There are a few small patches behind the glass where the silvering is damaged, but I am not too bothered by this, as it adds to the patina of the car. The make is Lucas.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

With the support bracket made for the left hand exhaust downpipe its time to make a similar one for the right hand exhaust.

 

1151.thumb.jpg.a7c7bd91d258f153d43f08964c546be5.jpg

 

Easy I thought! The problem being that the exhaust on the right hand side the exhaust is lower and I needed to make a different shaped plate to fix the downpipe to the bellhousing. I got down under there to make another cardboard pattern and realised I would also have to make different diameter clamp as the downpipe at this point was on a join and the outside diameter was larger. I said to myself "Oh dear what a shame", more likely - I came out with some stronger words!

 

1514.thumb.jpg.29574da44630bac23aa35f3e72a5f5aa.jpg

 

The other most suitable point on the exhaust down pipe was on the downward part from the flange that bolts to the cylinder barrel. At least the second clamp that I had already made could be used in this position. It is a 'bit busy' in this area with the radiator hose, steering box throttle and advance/retard linkage. I thought about using the two studs that bolt the engine to the engine mounting plate, but the nut on the lower stud would not come off completely as it was too close to exhaust pipe. How about a bracket that bolts to a threaded hole in the engine mounting plate, I thought?

 

1515.thumb.jpg.82ff152b7758e1368f6e21088fe7630f.jpg

 

I used this bore gauge to check the distances between the top and bottom of the clamp.

 

1516.thumb.jpg.3bb42b2f169b374173a2670d0f845db0.jpg

 

I also tried this gap gauge but it would not fit in as the handle part was too large.

 

1518.thumb.jpg.13fa74895ab6973a8f2cf6cd8472d19b.jpg

 

Now with the measurement's  between the downpipe and the engine mounting plate, I could make a cardboard pattern, with a little trimming it fitted.

 

1519.thumb.jpg.e083890ba6ee4adf2199eddff4be12b2.jpg

 

I found a scrap bit of 2" x 1" 14 gauge box section that I could cut the bracket out of.

 

1525.thumb.jpg.aa7d18b2fdc2370e30e09600ac16bee9.jpg

 

After cleaning the rough edges off the bracket I tacked it on to check if it fitted. I only did a small tack as I needed to take it apart easily if it did not fit. As I went to pick it up the two parts fell apart? My mind then wandered to thoughts of welding the other side of the lugs on the clamps. On this clamp as the back part of it is hidden I could attempt to do a neat weld on this one, as if the weld looked crap it wouldn't matter, as no body would see it! Over a cup of tea I pondered why my welds are not as good as they used to be when I was working in the bodyshop. I have a auto darkening welding mask, lately, I have found it difficult to see through when welding and wondered if that was my problem? I took the mask apart and looked through the front clear protective lens, it was filthy. As I didn't have a spare I cleaned it up with plastic polish and reassembled the mask. I tried welding with it and it made a huge difference. I could now see what I was doing.

 

1528.thumb.jpg.f70444b36cfd0280442e809bbebe0052.jpg

 

A lot better but not quite as good as I would have liked.

 

Edited by Mike Macartney
last photo deleted as it should not have been included (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to finish off the posts on the exhaust pipe support clamps.

 

1524.thumb.jpg.f1c324fee0dfde7cb317034ab46e9db0.jpg

 

The nuts for both of the clamps had the writing machined off the heads in the lathe.

 

1529.thumb.jpg.eb4cb38ab82e65e0334464c077fd8aff.jpg

 

Getting ready to weld the bracket onto the clamp (I should have put a glove on - It got hot when I welded it!)

 

1537.thumb.jpg.f3eb337cd66b26b6316647e911a93063.jpg

 

Blasted and ready to try to see if it fits.

 

1535a.thumb.jpg.ccce146099d7243bb046ddbcfaa9b22d.jpg

 

It fitted fine. I was then able to scribe through the hole to mark the engine mounting plate with an angled scriber.

I'll paint all the exhaust parts when we have a nice sunny day so that I can paint it outside in the fresh air.

 

1538.thumb.jpg.181f5770ccf94df407b8f099d230b482.jpg

 

Now it's time for a good clear up.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I put a post under General Discussions about some advice on repairing the radiator on the Humberette. Previously I have had lots of replies to my posts, but this time, only two replies which was a little disappointing.

 

When I bought the car from the son of the last restorer, who died, he said his father had spent £1,000 having the radiator repaired. If this was so, in my opinion, he didn't do a wonderful job!

I decided to test the rad for leaks, made some plugs to block the hoses and poured in some water.

 

1549.thumb.jpg.ffe3b0be0ec3c3f9347701cb85e43338.jpg

 

There appears to be quite a big leak from where the overflow pipe exits the header tank.

 

1553.thumb.jpg.aa9f28050bd3a36d05a30f8973dbf5d4.jpg

 

I am concerned that if I try and melt the solder around this area I may cause more leaks that will be more difficult to repair. After cleaning the area of the leak, is it best to put wet cloth around the area of the leak before resoldering the joint? Or, should I use something else? I remember from my days in the bodyshop we used something, I think, was called 'Cold Front' when heat shrinking.

 

1555.thumb.jpg.9e34fb0b3957e2bef514dcae66bb2a18.jpg

 

Another area for concern is on the right hand side of the radiator shell. The hood side (bonnet) must have been rubbing on the rear edge of the brass and has worn the corner away. as I have tried to show in the above photo. The outer shell of the radiator appears to be soldered to the radiator, therefore I don't want to disturb this soldering.

 

I have thought of two ways to repair this.

 

  1. Make a strip of brass to solder in to replace the missing area with some tags at the back to give it more strength to solder to each side of the joint.
  2. Cut out the return flange on the left side of the photo. Then make a new right angle part in brass to solder in place. Make another flat piece of brass to strengthen the joint behind the joint. Then try and solder the parts in place.

 

Your thoughts would be appreciated on these ideas, or can you suggest a better option?

 

There are dents to the radiator shell, which I think, if I try to remove them may prove difficult and may cause cracking to the brass shell. Perhaps I should leave the dents. Your thoughts would be appreciated.

 

1543.thumb.jpg.4631ad7124859001d244f96865f76532.jpg

 

1544.thumb.jpg.9ac54c698df81257bce7748a72c61887.jpg

 

Just to amuse you, here is a photo of the last restorers idea of a front hood hinge pin location.

 

1545.thumb.jpg.46e0caeb20e1a2ced06e85c7285eb29a.jpg

 

A new use for a wing nut!

 

Hoping somebody reading this post can give me some advice or their thoughts?

Edited by Mike Macartney
punctuation. (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Mike.  I have been following with interest.  When I replaced the neck of my radiator I used microfibre cloths soaked in water to protect the solder that I feared could melt and give me even more problems.  I think you are wise not to attempt removal of the shell.  I think this is a specialist job.  Personally, I would pay to get the shell repaired professionally; an expensive item in any restoration but worth every penny to get it looking it's best.

 

Ray.

radiator 004.JPG

radiator 005.JPG

radiator 008.JPG

radiator 009.JPG

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ray,

 

Many thanks for your reply. I was very interested to see the photos. Did you copper plate the neck and then nickel plate it before soldering it to the radiator? Is the plating kit an electric brush on system? If so where did you get it from?

 

It seems the wet cloth idea works then.

 

Looking at the rad again this morning. I think you are right in that I would be better leaving it to a specialist to remove and repair the shell. I'll see if I can get an estimate of the cost involved. I'll add some more photos later, that I took this morning.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good Morning Mike,

This time of year is very easy for me to stay overly busy with things "not auto related".  I just noticed that my responses to you have been off, just a bit, and for that I apologize!  You are a very creative craftsman in how you addressed a mechanical need to improve a weak point in your exhaust system.  You and I must have been poured out of the same boot as I would have made a very similar approach to that very problem.  Then how you devised to make the brackets all the same instead of some rather crude thing that we Utah farmers would have tried, you did it right.  My thinking on the radiator issue mentioned above, I don't have faith in the previous repair story you were told.  Wear, wing nut an piles of solder, oh no.  (Almost sounds like the Wizard of Oz)!  If I were in your predicament, I think I would actually approach the core first, clean clean clean and then adequate flux, control the heat from doing collateral damage and fix the leak in the core.  I would then approach the solder that needs removal and some additional love.  As good a craftsman as you are, I know you could facilitate a redo and end up with a very much nicer job and get the darn leak stopped at the same time.  I would then approach the worn side trim.  I agree, I would form a new replacement piece, remove what is needed and clean clean clean then solder in the repair piece in place.  Lastly, if the dents in the top tank skin had some deeper gashes, I might be nervous, but I think you could likely build some type of long reach tool that you could use from the inside to dolly out the dings.  You may not get them out perfectly but I would bet that you could tidy those dings to where it appears much cleaner and would not damage the integrity of the brass skin.  Now be sure of this Mike, the above are simply my "two cent" comments and would be my approach.  You have the making of a very nice looking radiator, but one that has a few issues.  The radiator, for my Locomobile, needs both sides replaced from top to bottom and I am not scared of that job.  With care, I think your radiator could be made to look better and you would end up with something that does not leak as a bonus.

Al

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Second thought,  I just read your response to Ray.  That idea is also a good option, if you have a trusted radiator guy that can do better work than you and it doesn't take your left leg and two fingers to finance the job.  Your leg is an important thing to you getting around!

Al

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.gaterosplating.co.uk/plating-kits

 

Mike.  Here is a link to the electro plating kit suppliers.  I have only had success with small items using a brush kit. When I attempted to do my radiator shell I found that when I took a break for lunch and returned to the work, there was a definite "line" where I had restarted. I eventually handed it over to Derby Plating who did a fine job.

 

With regard to the radiator neck, I made sure that the underside was cleaned back to brass so the solder would take.  I then tinned both surfaces before final assembly.  

 

I don't know if other plating kits are any better than the one I used. The only criticism I would make is that is that the wands are not really up to doing a lot of parts and I ended up making my own.  I am sure you will be easily able to adapt the equipment to suit your needs.

 

(BTW are you doing Brighton this year?  If you need a passenger let me know.  Cheers.  Ray.)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Thanks guys, I appreciate all your feedback.

 

I found the leaky culprit!

 

1556.thumb.jpg.6844d094533fa64f5474aeff06902cd3.jpg

 

I am happy to have a go repairing the leak, but I am still in a dilemma about what to do with 'Winston's the 'under the railway arches in Brixton expensive restoration/repairs to the radiator!'

 

1557.thumb.jpg.d419e29510c3e8fb13c8ecd40d749f87.jpg

 

The core of the radiator looks in very good condition and I assume this was replaced. I am thinking now of using it 'as is' after I have repaired the leak whilst getting a price for a professional rebuild. If it is going to cost an 'arm and a leg' - I might be hopping mad!:) If it costs an arm and two legs - I'll end up bumming around afterwards!:rolleyes:

 

Seriously, if it is very expensive to repair professionally I may do my best with it and leave some of it's battle scars.

 

1561.thumb.jpg.d5339456e112b3ad6f0ee16e7bb15478.jpg

 

As the car was purchased new in 1914, just before the start of the Great War (WW1) and taken off the road 8-years after the war. The dents and blemished are at least period!

 

I'll see if I can get a price of this company http://www.vintagecarradiatorcompany.co.uk/radiators/restoration

Edited by Mike Macartney
punctuation. (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I taken the plunge and emailed for a 'ball park' price for the radiator restoration.

 

1540.thumb.jpg.54351289e8ddb8197b00a6093582e9e8.jpg

 

1558.thumb.jpg.17f01377c55d6374d636a69fa68fc2df.jpg

 

1559.thumb.jpg.d6904240fd9936ce52d2399ae3f4668b.jpg

 

1560.thumb.jpg.a56b3d1d8669fee43c925e8ceac901d5.jpg

 

I did try using a Scotchbrite and polishing bob in the Dremel type tool to see if I could tidy up the excess solder. The work would be very laborious and still look like a 'sows ear'!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Mike,

Patience is a virtue for sure when dealing with some of our projects.

Al

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

There seems to be a patch in each of the four corners of the rad.?  I would hope a restorer could effect a repair that obviates the need for them.  I think It would certainly improve the look if the radiator was tidied up; indeed, I notice that the core appears not to be square with the surround.   However,  I appreciate that not everyone thinks the same as me and that to some the car is merely showing signs of it's age.

 

I think you are to be commended for returning the car to how it might have presented originally.  

 

Ray.

Edited by R.White
missed a bit (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Mike Macartney said:

 

1561.thumb.jpg.d5339456e112b3ad6f0ee16e7bb15478.jpg

 

As the car was purchased new in 1914, just before the start of the Great War (WW1) and taken off the road 8-years after the war. The dents and blemished are at least period!

 

 

So Mike, is the article talking about the specific car you own now?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the car I am restoring now is the same Humberette that is the photo above. The first person to buy the car started the restoration and died 2 to 3 years ago, the next person who bought the car died in June last year at the age of 73. I then bought the car, hoping that it is third time lucky, and that I finish the restoration, before I too 'pop my clogs'! I'm keeping my fingers crossed, as I'm 72, but due to years of smoking and working in a bodyshop, without wearing a mask, my lungs are shot. Even walking down to the garage 35 yards I am struggling for breath and have to take a breather before I start working on the car. Let that be a warning to others not to be so 'Gung Ho'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...