Taylormade

Radiator Leak

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I ran into a problem with my radiator - a pin hole leak in the lower hose fitting.  You can see the drop of water that forms in the photo below.  This is a 32 Dodge Brothers, so it’s not a pressurized system.

 

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I would really like to avoid taking the radiator out of the car and removing my newly chromed shell to get this repaired.  If I remove the hose there is room to work in there.  What is the best repair technique for this problem?  Could I solder the hole?  Would JB Weld work in this situation?  I know the surface will have to be clean and dry before any work is done.  Any suggestions welcome.

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I would sand it clean, wash it with denatured alcohol and use JB weld.  I've had good luck with it if it's done right.  One problem is that if the radiator is corroded in one spot, It could spring a leak later and ruin your day!  But then, I worry a lot! 

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I used a product think it was called KW sealer got it at advanced auto about $20.00 do it per the instructions on the bottle and it will stop that leak and any you don't know about . Did my DB this spring and have not had to add coolant all summer.  Mike

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If the leak is in a soldered area. you could take a center punch and give it a light tap just next to the leak. that will crowd the solder into the hole,

'This method even workes on steel steam boilers. It is called "caulking"

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Had a similar problem on the road one time in a Jaguar XKE, and since it was a pressurized system and blowing steam I had to address it with what was on hand -- only a screwdriver. Took a small screw off a trim piece and screwed it into the hole, sealing the leak. Might not work if your part is all rusted out. JB Weld would be worth a try.

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Looks like with hose off you could solder from inside . Is it a brass piece with just a sand hole ? Maybe even can get away with electric solder gun and acid core on super cleaned surface .

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Yes, steel necks on my radiator - which is now in the radiator shop being repaired.  As much as I hated to do it, I took everything apart and drove 60 miles one way to the only radiator shop in the area that still does this type of work.  Should be ready tomorrow, so another drive and twenty-five bucks and the problem is solved.  Thanks for all the advice.

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3 hours ago, Taylormade said:

Yes, steel necks on my radiator - which is now in the radiator shop being repaired.  As much as I hated to do it, I took everything apart and drove 60 miles one way to the only radiator shop in the area that still does this type of work.  Should be ready tomorrow, so another drive and twenty-five bucks and the problem is solved.  Thanks for all the advice.

 

Outstanding!

It looked to me the neck was steel or cast iron. I was very tempted to advise against quick and easy attempts at a fix, as alluring they might be.

I'm reminded of the saying "there's never enough time or money to do it right, but there's always enough to do it over"..............Bob

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:)Hi Taylormade, there seems to be quite a bit of room in there to work. What I would do is to use a rotary tool and clean, shine the hole . There are tiny torches on the market you can use to solder the hole . Use something as a heat shield to protect vulnerable areas. Do it right the first time . These metal parts pits from the inside and given the age of the components it is likely so.

The water jacket on  my 6 cylinder looks beautiful from the outside but inside there were numerous pits. I cleaned out the pits and soldered the holes from the inside.    

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$25? Wow! It would cost that much here for someone to look at it, let alone fix it. Xclnt outcome!

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