RatFink255

Newbie with 1922 Buick Model 35 Touring car

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Well as you know I have been trying to find a picture of the fuel gauge logo as shown in an above post. I have had no luck so I decided to take a different approach and make my own a bit different that the original. I hand cut it out of vinyl with X-acto knife and a very sharp blade. First cleaned up the gauge housing removed the float by filing of the peen repainting the housing with Jet Glow (an aircraft paint that is fuel resistant) and reassembling it. Here are the before and after. 

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Making progress on getting the rear end back in on the frame. I did have to undo the left side shackle to swing it into place. 

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It is defiantly harder to do by your self than with other people helping. My wife being a good sport and a great support of the project helps with what she could but with her bad knees she was a bit limited, however she has always made the difference in getting things in place. She works the hoist up and down as I call out while I mussel stuff into position. Now just have to start putting the breaks with associated activation rods and parts on then the wheels to get off the jack stands. I will feel much better once it is back on the ground on the wheels not having to worry about knocking it off the jack stands. 

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Edited by RatFink255 (see edit history)
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I had to make the break return springs as one was broken and the other did not have much spring left in it. The ones I made were just a wee bit thicker in the wire I used but very close they now have very good return of the arm they are attached to.

 

 

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Brice,.

These springs are also on my make list. Did you form them with "hot" wire  or is cold forming  sufficient?

 

Did you need to replace any bearings thru the rear axle ?

 

Thanks for the photos and advice.

 

Regards

Norm

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Norm,

I used music wire spring steel (I will get the diameter of the wire and mandrel I used for you tonight when get home from work) then used a the lathe and did them cold. Here is the link that I used to figure how to make them for the most part. I turned the lathe by hand no power so that I could keep control of the wind. Also I did not make a wire holder as he shows I just used the tool holder with a longer square stock (about 100 mm long) then just kept it tight and move slow as I turned the the lathe so that the coils would stay tight to each other. The couple things that you do have to do though is 1) keep the pressure on the lathe head so the wire does not try and unwind before your finished, 2) be sure your square stock is real close to the mandrel and wire as you turn because you get near the end the last bit will try and jump off the square stock. I did come up one half coil short on the spring do to the length wire but being that the wire was slightly bigger dia it seems to have more than enough force to pull the arm back compared to the original springs. Being also that it is modern music wire spring steel and most likely of better quality  it should hold up and be a bit stronger spring. Hope that helps you.

 

 

 

 

Edited by RatFink255 (see edit history)

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Norm,

The spring wire I used is 1/8" (.125) 3 foot long. The mandrel is 3/4" (.753). I just had a steel rod laying around that fit the bill so I filed a small flat on it and then drilled taped hole for screw and washer to hold the wire in place while I turned the lathe. Use just a big enough washer to hold the wire if you use to big of one it will interfere with the first wind and you will not keep the coils tight side by side.

Brice

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Got wheels back on the frame then started to put tires  on got two on then discovered that apparently when the tires were put on two were put on with white walls the other two were put on with black walls. I am going for the white walls all around so have to take two off and re do as the they mount only one way onto the wheels. I got one off just trying to figure the reinstall with out damaging the stem or tire.

 

Mark Kikta, what was the trick to getting the rim inside the tire as it is a rime that is cut and it is close to the valve stem? Did you have the rim separated or secured and locked then work the tire around? Just saw Mark Shaw's reply about using a rime tool and found some pictures showing it being used good idea. Now to find one.


 

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Did you do those tires without a rim tool.  That is a lot of work.  The rim tool is put on the rim in a different orientation depending on if the rim is being removed or installed.  Be cautious as well that improper use of a rim tool can damage a rim.     Hugh

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On 9/3/2019 at 12:39 PM, RatFink255 said:

I had to make the break return springs as one was broken and the other did not have much spring left in it. The ones I made were just a wee bit thicker in the wire I used but very close they now have very good return of the arm they are attached to.

 

 

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I'm surprised to see a Hotchkiss Drive on a car that also has a torque tube. I figured it would be one or the other. My E-49 has the rear axle mounted to the rear of the leaf spring in a "cantilever" fashion, with a lubricated bearing where the axle attaches to the end of the spring, it has no spring perch, it has a place to put oil so the axle spins freely relative to the leaf spring. All the torque goes through the torque tube. But your car has the axle mounted fast to the leaf spring, so torque is transmitted through it, as well as through the torque tube. That's weird, I'm scratching my head over here.

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Hugh,

 

I did not put the tires on originally. I think dad did. So now going to swap two of them around so they all match, hence asking the best way to do it.  

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On ‎9‎/‎24‎/‎2019 at 5:04 PM, Terry Wiegand said:

One has to keep in mind that these 4-Cylinder models were a whole 'nother animal.

 

Terry Wiegand

Way Out in Doo Dah

 

Just because they were not a six cylinder car does not make them "another animal" if you are implying that they were a bad car.   Still a good car with a chassis that a Buick truck was also made from.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)

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I think Terry was speaking about my remark about how the 4 has a torque tube and spring perches at the same time, while the 6 has a cantilever suspension and the rear axle housing has a lubricated bearing to attach to the leaf spring which has a big brass bearing at the back where the axle attaches, and an oiler.

 

I am wondering about the 4 though as well. I think it's impossible for a car to have a torque tube and Hotchkiss drive at the same time. If the rear axle housing is held fast by the torque tube, and the leaf spring has a shackle at one end and a bolt at the other, and the axle is in the middle of the spring, there will be motion of the leaf spring every time it goes over a bump, relative to the axle. The axle has to rotate relative to the spring. Actually the axle doesn't move, the spring does. If the axle and spring are held fast together by a spring perch, the axle housing needs to rotate a little over every bump in the road, which it can't do because of the torque tube, which is why Hotchkiss drive cars have a universal joint at the rear of the drive shaft, and torque tube cars don't need one.

 

Was there a brass bearing on the leaf spring/axle for where they meet, as well as some sort of oiler? It looks like you painted over everything so I can't tell.

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Larry, 

The 4-Cylinder Buicks WERE NOT BAD CARS!!  The point that I was trying to get across was that it seemed that all of the engineering advancements at the time was poured into the 6-Cylinder models.  Anyone who thinks that the Buick Fours were second rate doesn't know anything about Buick history.  The Buick Motor Company had one of the winning-est factory sponsored race teams at the time based on that 4-Cylinder engine.  Ben hit it right on the head - almost zero commonality of basic parts between the 4's and 6's.  I have a very healthy respect for the 4-Cylinder Buick after driving Sandy Rose's 1914 4-Cylinder Roadster and having the daylights scared out of me while riding in that 1915 truck of yours.

 

Terry Wiegand

Doo Dah America

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Just to clarify my comment about the 1915 Buick Truck of Larry Schramm's in my last post.  Larry gives new definition to the phrase "DRIVE IT LIKE YOU STOLE IT"

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Morgan,

 

Are you talking about right here on the axial tube? There is a grease nipple that is used for greasing but I am not sure if it is brass or not. You can't see the grease nipple as covered with masking tape to keep paint off but it is under tape in second and third picture. 

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Ratfink255,

 

I used a rim tool also to pull the rim in and make it smaller.  It was relatively easy with that tool.

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4 hours ago, RatFink255 said:

Morgan,

 

Are you talking about right here on the axial tube? There is a grease nipple that is used for greasing but I am not sure if it is brass or not. You can't see the grease nipple as covered with masking tape to keep paint off but it is under tape in second and third picture. 

 

 

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Yup that's the place. Looks like you have everything under control, that looks like a bearing, not a welded spring perch. The axle tube rotates relative to the spring, and all is well. I was pretty sure a car with a torque tube could never have a fast attachment there.

 

Mine has an oil filler cap but grease zerks were invented after my car and before your car so you have a zerk. 

 

I just hope you didn't paint the inside of the bearing or outside of the axle housing at that spot. If you did you need to remove the paint.

.

.

Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)
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My car, when I took that bearing apart, had no oil or grease in it, it had dried mud and horse poop. I expect that horse poop is a better lubricant than pure mud.

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