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Auction that pipe dreams are made of


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Others have stayed that there might be no heirs.  Someone else stated they buy an antique every now and again, as prices have really crashed.

 

Folks, the sad reality is that there may be heirs, and prices have crashed on all this stuff and will continue to do so.  The younger generations don't want any of this junk.  In the next few decades it's going to be a buyer's market for all this stuff, furniture, guns, even care.

 

I have a beautiful tiger maple canopy bed circa 1835 I picked up at auction in April.  Cost me $850. There's a sticker on the right end post where the previous owner wrote they bought it in 1985 and paid SIX THOUSAND dollars for it.  That was fair market value then.  I have a beautiful inlaid table from Baltimore circa 1800 I paid $2400 for.  Previous owner bought it for $15000.  Who knows.  I might struggle to get a grand for it someday.

 

Believe me, I enjoy antique cars (the earlier the better!), but if you think they are immune from this they are not.  The younger kids don't want this stuff or, if they do, they are burdened by student loans.  There just might be the day when an antique car, running/restored, bringing less than five figures, unless very unique or rare, might be the norm.

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2 hours ago, mrcvs said:

prices have really crashed.

If you feel prices on antiques and our cars has crashed - take a look at philately. I spend time collecting stamps when my old bones hurt too much from crawling around under a car. I recently offered a small collection of approximately 3000 different Russian stamps, from 1860's to 1990's, for sale on Ebay. The collection has a catalog value of $3500. Catalog value is now a total misleading number as the honest real value of this is probably about 10% of that at $350. I had no interest at $85. Ten to 15 years ago this would have sold quickly for around a $1000. Fortunately I think most of us collect for shear appreciation of our whatevers and do not plan to supplement our retirement from the income of sales. 

The generation today, and I am not saying they are wrong, need instant gratification for the expenditure of their time and money. That just seems to be the way it is. 

PS: If any of you have stamps for sale for .01¢ on the $ send me a PM. ?

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First rule of collecting is buy what you enjoy.  Second is to shop around a little for best value unless the item is so rare that it does not often come up for sale.  Third rule (my rule) is not be concerned with resale value.  If you are a dealer, rule three does not count but for the rest of us I believe it mirrors our enjoyment of any kind of antique.  We are the caretakers of history when we own these items.  

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The house and its furnishings, the garage/barn and tools and all the other cool stuff appears to have been the fulfillment of a dream for the past owners.  They had the time, the money and inclination.  This auction is a glimpse at our individual futures as well.  My kids (both female) don't have the interest any more than this families kids apparently do.  The best I draw from this is they really seemed to have enjoyed their life.  I wish that for all of us as well.

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9 hours ago, Joe in Canada said:

If we keep talking about a failing antique car market folks reading this may cause the bottom to drop out.

Bring it on, baby!  I have seen photographs on this forum of a beautiful 1910 Maytag on this forum that, at current valuation, would make ownership in this lifetime by myself a virtual impossibility.  Should interest, and therefore, value, plummet, it's a whole different ballgame!

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Auction results:

 

1919 Touring-12k

1923 School bus-10k

'29 panel delivery-11800.00

'30 AA-10200.00

'30 Rs coupe-10200.00

'30Roadster-15800.00

'51 Plymouth-7800.00

'31 Victoria-13800.00

'56 T-Bird-16400.00

'52 Firetruck-f3-12400.00

'66 Belvedere-8400.00

'65 Corvair-6800.00

'65 Econoline-6000.00

 

 Add 10% b.p. To all the above.

 

Must be the economy really is good. I thought they realized very good prices for an auction. I'm only knowledgeable Ina few makes but I feel most of those cars brought very good prices. The auctioneer was very good, definitely helped get some of the cars a premium.

  I got there at 8a.m and nobody had shown up yet. By auction time at 10a.m. It was a circus with trucks and trailers everywhere And over 400 registered bidders. I came home empty handed but enjoyed the show

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I also attended, hoping to bring home the AA panel delivery. I thought the price was high, but what do I know... Especially since they either could not or would not start the car. There was a rather round gent on the side of the tent on a cell phone that seemed to be talking to a far away bidder that bid on EVERY car, but then mysteriously dropped out just before the car sold. Didn't sit well with me...

 

Frank

Edited by oldford (see edit history)
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Shill bidding, that is, the auctioneer bidding prices up to meet reserves, is legal in most states, as long as the auction house discloses the fact they are bidding during the sale.

 

I've been at auctions where the auctioneer seemed to be staring off into the distance when announcing a bid, and then all of a sudden if more bids don't come, that bid dollar amount disappears and it goes back to a "real" bidder.

 

I think it happens quite often, legal or not.  I did read that it's totally illegal in Pennsylvania, announced or not....

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On ‎8‎/‎5‎/‎2018 at 2:05 PM, tyler searle said:

Auction results:

 

1919 Touring-12k

1923 School bus-10k

'29 panel delivery-11800.00

'30 AA-10200.00

'30 Rs coupe-10200.00

'30Roadster-15800.00

'51 Plymouth-7800.00

'31 Victoria-13800.00

'56 T-Bird-16400.00

'52 Firetruck-f3-12400.00

'66 Belvedere-8400.00

'65 Corvair-6800.00

'65 Econoline-6000.00

 

 Add 10% b.p. To all the above.

 

Must be the economy really is good. I thought they realized very good prices for an auction. I'm only knowledgeable Ina few makes but I feel most of those cars brought very good prices. The auctioneer was very good, definitely helped get some of the cars a premium.

  I got there at 8a.m and nobody had shown up yet. By auction time at 10a.m. It was a circus with trucks and trailers everywhere And over 400 registered bidders. I came home empty handed but enjoyed the show

I was there  Prices were very high for these vehicles.  The 20' trailer, looked over 10 years old, sold for more than a new one.  Not all his auctions have such high bids for cars.   This was his largest at 500 people or more.  

Edited by ChazA (see edit history)
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On ‎8‎/‎5‎/‎2018 at 8:52 PM, oldford said:

I also attended, hoping to bring home the AA panel delivery. I thought the price was high, but what do I know... Especially since they either could not or would not start the car. There was a rather round gent on the side of the tent on a cell phone that seemed to be talking to a far away bidder that bid on EVERY car, but then mysteriously dropped out just before the car sold. Didn't sit well with me... 

 

Frank

I believe I know who you mean, and not a shill bidder.  He buys a lot of cars at the auctions as he works with a local collector.  Prolly dropped out as prices were too high...nothing fishy with him.

Edited by ChazA (see edit history)
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