Terry Harper

Using 3D technology

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I am currently working on the lower water manifold for my big 6 cylinder Wisconsin T-head (5-3/4"x7") This is the last major  assembly I have

to fabricate. Like everything else on this beast it was bronze fittings with brass tubing and disappeared many, many decades ago so we have been working

on re-creating as accurately as possible all the missing bits including the intake manifold and upper water manifold - all of which are brass

and bronze as well.

 

A number of years ago I fabricated most of the patterns and core boxes for the lower water manifold but they just were not quite right.

So... over the past few weeks I have been back at it. I started off modeling in 3D each fitting. I worked from sketches and measurements

of originals as well as from silicone molds pulled by a friend off original fittings loaned by our state museum.

 

For some reason Wisconsin decided to use a rigid connection between the front fitting and the water pump. There is a flanged pipe that

connects to the water pump and slides inside the front fitting and is held in place with a big gland nut.

 

Here is a photo showing what I mean:

100_0031b.thumb.jpg.75de97c52d68ca8fad2d4e15971ea592.jpg

 

As you can see the angle and offsets are critical so everything lines up. The first step was modeling the fittings in 3D. Below is a rendering

of the complete manifold. To give you an idea of size its 16-1/2" between the fittings. The connector pipes are 1-1/4" brass tube.

644456752_LowerWaterManifold1.thumb.jpg.35c9e33c607ffe74f29dcc1a2cf9a46a.jpg

 

With the models and the shop drawings done I 3D printed a mock-up of the front fitting to verify that everything worked.

IMG_1428.thumb.JPG.29f579c307ad00d7800010e4d9fda17c.JPG

 

The 3D print got a little messed-up at the top of the curved piece. I forgot to turn on "supports" which

creates a temporary structure to support any overhangs etc.  Fortunately (it took 19 hours to print!) that boo boo

didn't affect the fit between the block and the pump. I also didn't bother printing the gland nut.

IMG_1422.thumb.JPG.75f390af99f4fdd03e0cc0bfc372aa03.JPG

 

I also created all the models for the core boxes and patterns. These also will be 3D printed. Each fitting requires a five part

pattern - 2 halves for the body, 2 halves for the neck/flange and a backer. Below is one half of a complete pattern on its

backer.

P5.thumb.jpg.69463f93d66ec2c15cba47fe96c743bc.jpg

 

There are also two core boxes per fitting. In the rendering below I superimposed a complete core. In reality The cores are formed as

two separate halves and are glued together after curing.  The core boxes will be 3D printed as well.

P7.thumb.jpg.d72adb1ac35d9833399ec20d2e70071d.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wow!  I am impressed at your ability to draw the parts with that much detail and accuracy to the original parts.   I needed a horn button for my 29 Hupmobile and 3D printed one.  Most of our local library's have 3D printers that are free to use and you only pay for the material used.  My horn button cost me 80 cents. 

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That looks fantastic! New technologies have opened up a new ways of making parts.  I cast up some shocks using 3D printed patterns and I cant tell from the original one I used as the sample. The only draw back I found was finding foundries that wanted to make small runs of parts.

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The only draw back I found was finding foundries that wanted to make small runs of parts.

 

That is very true. One thing to remember is that there is a fairly large community out there of folks with "backyard foundries"

These are a mix hobbyists and professionals who cast metal for the challenge, fun and their own projects. Most are very willing to

to share their expertise and knowledge. Here is a link to a forum which is a great place to contact these folks through.

 

http://www.alloyavenue.com/vb/forum.php

 

In fact most of the casting I have had done are by a gentleman with just such a setup. He and his wife sell crafts at various venues and he

casts items for it. He also casts and sells items to the Live Steam railroad people and for his own projects. He does demo's at museums and

various events as well. Again, this is a hobby for him - not a vocation, he just enjoys it. When I have something to cast I supply the

metal and patterns and we have a "foundry 101" day.

 

100_4370.thumb.JPG.7dc4af847597247909ae4a9ac23868db.JPG

 

Here is a set of patterns we created for the valve shrouds for a 1917 FWD truck. The FWD used the same Wisconsin

model "A" engine as Stutz etc. In this case I used a CNC milling machine to mill the patterns and core boxes.

So far Peter has cast a number of sets to help folks along with their restorations.

 

IMG_0982.thumb.jpg.0cb170ccd8ac91a5ee1c76d9d89586c0.jpg

 

895591789_Shroudsascast.thumb.jpg.02a9350f65a11425a07ed1e4f68c81da.jpg

 

Until a few years ago when I started this project I had no clue on how to do this stuff. But like many things we learn.

That's the best part of a interest or hobby - you have the opportunity to learn new skills and like any skill once learned

it can never be taken away.

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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love this, doing some of this on my 1929 Chevrolet I am restoring.

 

needed a spacer, none available, designed it up in CAD, 3D printed a few of various thickness and then test fitted.

 

few other parts I am working on as well I do a LOT in CAD, when i have to make a new gasket I digitize the original, then i can print a paper 1 : 1 and trace out on material. this way IF a gasket is detroyed I have a digital file to recreate it no worries.

 

Technology is Grand when you use it for resourceful reasons !!

 

now to 3d print the parts i need and find a guy like you all that can pour and cast them :)

 

here is a shot of 3 spacers of various thicknesses 6mZ7UHhnevdDNpatHtFZ-nqO-FFrhaf9vtfljwNn

 

wondering if the 3d print was accurate, holes were dead on !!

Nvv0SYnt2yMkRlFR9aMY94tsD0nMb0GaLCWuBJkL

 

 

Edited by BearsFan315 (see edit history)
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Here is another project I did last year. I had to (wanted too!). A friend needed a magneto coupling for a Wisconsin T-head.

For a number of years Wisconsin used a proprietary design developed by one of the firm's founders Arthur Milbrath. I had

to reverse engineer it using patent drawings and measurements of some surviving pieces.

 

Again the parts were modeled in 3D and a set of shop drawing created. (I also 3D printed a mock-up) Like the valve shrouds

I used Fusion 360 to generate the machine setups and tool paths and milled the patterns out using the Tormach 440.

 

Here is the exploded view of the assemply

Exploded.thumb.jpg.1cd64afbbdf9813c480c660437c680ba.jpg

 

Here is the mock-up, shop drawings and pattern components. Once complete the pattern components were mounted on a match plate

and are ready to cast.

IMG_1168.thumb.jpg.4fa3b0825e16113ecdcdfae15c51b0ec.jpg

 

Here are the finished patterns which allow four sets to be cast at once.

IMG_1279.thumb.jpg.e174c70d75d891de27d2f81beee2c305.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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In my first post on this thread I posted the renderings of the patterns for part no. A27A (Lower water manifold rear fitting)

Today we finished 3D printing the last of the components for the pattern and core boxes. These will still need to be post processed

- cleaned-up with any imperfections filled and sanded. Once that's done they will be primed, wet sanded and then a gloss top coat

applied - the better the finish the easier the pattern can be pulled from the mold and the better quality casting.

 

Below is a photo of the patterns, follower and core boxes in the raw just out of the printer. You can see some of the rough areas where the

temporary supports were attached. The supports allow you to print over hanging features. They are easily broken away and removed

after the print is complete than the rough areas sanded, filled etc.

 

IMG_1463.thumb.JPG.37eb0738880a547759812aa0d58cc1d1.JPG

 

One piece took over 57 hours to print. Granted after doing the setup and sending through the file it simply ran by itself

and I was free to work on other things. In the 3D printing world a quality print equals time - lots of time unless you

are using the megabucks equipment.

 

3D printing reminds me of when Texas Instruments came out with the first hand held calculator - they cost a lot of money back then now I can

spend a couple of bucks and buy a calculator that has the same functions and is a lot smaller. Same with 3D printing. I printed

these using our Creality CR-10 which sells for less than $1,000.00. The quality doesn't match the megabuck commercial equipment

but it does a real nice job.

 

Now its onto printing the patterns for the front fitting.

 

Best regards,

 

Terry

 

 

 

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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Its been awhile but I thought I would share the end results. Here we have the completed patterns and core boxes.

This was a set of patterns I simply dreaded fabricating. In fact I am glad I procrastinated because I am sure I would

have had a very difficult time fabricating these by hand out of wood. I am sure it can be done but not with my skill level

or thin wallet!

 

As you can see we have a four piece pattern plus a follower  and two core boxes. Once I had the prints I went over them with

sand paper and filler followed by a two coats of primer and a top coat. The filler was bondo simply smeared on with my fingers as thin

as possible. It sands very easy and works well to smooth the layers left from the printing process as well as imperfections left from

the temporary supports. Since I am not using the most high tech printers this is typical. I use rattle can automotive paint and wet sand between layers.

I probably go over board with the finish but the smoother it is the easier the patterns can be removed from the mold.

 

IMG_1529.thumb.JPG.0e854a19f2527e697d5ca6d9e4eabe68.JPG

 

 

Because of the curved part line of the patterns I could not use dowels for the alignment pins since they would

be a different angles to each other and would have made assembling and disassembling the pattern impossible.

 

I ended up using round head rivets which give enough variation in the angle of pull to work.

IMG_1528.thumb.JPG.ef22e2aba23929d1e508d16f8a96de00.JPG

 

Anyway... now its time to finish the other two sets of patterns and get some bronze poured!

 

Best regards,

 

Terry

 

 

 

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Nice thread here Terry.  I wish I had availability to have and run a 3D machine.  I have made a couple of patterns the "old fashioned" way.  It is a bunch of work but the outcome is very rewarding, as you have suggested.  Of course, I am watching your progress with sure enthusiasm.

Al

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To bring closure to this thread, over the weekend I finished the last of the patterns and core boxes for the Lower

water manifold on my big Wisconsin T-head motor.

 

When I first started this project way back in late 2008 I was advised by some people that it was beyond me

and I should just give the project to someone else. To be sure, trying to replicate the missing brass and

bronze fittings was a daunting task - the brass and bronze Intake manifold, upper water manifold, lower

water manifold, oil pump drive housing and a bunch of little parts all had to be replicated and that required

a large number of patterns and core boxes. At the time I had never had any experience with foundry work

or making patterns - terms such as draft, machining allowance and shrinkage were foreign to me.

 

Well... here we are today and now I have all the patterns and core boxes done. Hopefully, soon I will have some nice

castings to work with and the best part? I did it all myself!

 

Its been a long road... I started out working with wood and learning how to turn elbows etc. on the lathe and casting plaster

core boxes from wood masters. From that I progressed to 3D printing technology.

 

Here is a photo of my very first pattern. This was for the oil pump drive housing. To the left is the only remnant I had left of the original.

100_2228.thumb.JPG.e217f302d6281ba174e2c4f2e9acf178.JPG

 

Here are all the wood patterns and plaster core boxes for the intake manifold

100_3697-c.jpg.594782204a35fee2477650c8accf888c.jpg

 

Intake manifold casting ready for assembly

IMG_4064.thumb.JPG.94acd3c96f71374f6906d4beb0e828de.JPG

 

Below are some of the wood patterns and the new upper water manifold

100_4443.thumb.JPG.d7d182606539d27172def23fe31c037f.JPG

 

And finally the very last set! These are the 3D printed patterns and core boxes for the lower water manifold. All of these have a four part

pattern plus a follower to hold the pattern in the correct position. In the lower left corner you can see the only remaining original fitting

that I had.

 

IMG_1662.thumb.JPG.a3fa0c7223987f910ff404ea72a3e3b1.JPG

 

Now it's off to the foundry! Once the castings for the lower water manifold are in hand I will have replacements all the missing fittings

and parts with the exception of the starter and generator.

 

 

Best regards,

 

Terry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This is great stuff!  Thanks for sharing Terry.  What 3D modeling software are you using?  

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Thanks for sharing your journey and progress with your parts.

Your work is fabulous.

And thank you for posting the link so others can find small foundries in their area.

 

I hope I get to see the day when owner's clubs will have dozens and dozens of files available to download that will allow any member to 3-D print parts for their restoration and maintenance projects.

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11 hours ago, MikeC5 said:

This is great stuff!  Thanks for sharing Terry.  What 3D modeling software are you using?  

 

Hi Mike,

I used Inventor Professional for this project. For future projects I have swapped over to SolidWorks. I teach engineering graphics

so they are readily available to me. The 3D printer is a Creality CR10. Its affordable and never seems to quit.

 

For finishing I usually smear a thin coat of bondo on then sand followed by a couple coats of primer (sanded between coats)

and one or two rattle can top coats. The smoother the finish the easier the pattern can be pulled from the 

mold.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thanks' for the extra information. Can you suggest any 'links' for others that might want learn more to try doing similar projects in the future?

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That is impressive! I was a pattern maker by trade, started making patterns with bandsaws disc sanders and hand tools. Built a tooling/foundry business which I have since sold the business and did in it's time Sterolitography, LOM and 3D printing transitioning to 3D machining. After 40 years of in that business I can say I loved making patterns but dreaded the business end of probably because I focused on fast turn prototype and pre-production machined castings. Fairly new on the scene is 3D printed sand molds with the coring and gating built in, I think the future is printed sand molds even for production.

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Terry

 

gonna use your insights for finishing & top coating some parts i have been working on. sure you do thin light coats as not to stray far from design intent dimensions. 

 

I have been Using Inventor for years (using Inventor Pro), and is my go to software, recently been training on Solidworks Premium and while it is nice, i prefer Inventor, especially when trying to do intense designs as well and customize the software for user interaction. I know what i want to do in Solidworks just can not get it to do it, or takes more steps than usual, and clicking the Check mark or esc is driving me CRAZY !!! also have experience using Pro E, which is now Creo, actually that is where i started.

 

just need to get more in depth into the creating of custom parts. i have the software and a 3d printer, mainly printing PLA :)

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2 hours ago, BearsFan315 said:

Terry

 

gonna use your insights for finishing & top coating some parts i have been working on. sure you do thin light coats as not to stray far from design intent dimensions. 

 

I have been Using Inventor for years (using Inventor Pro), and is my go to software, recently been training on Solidworks Premium and while it is nice, i prefer Inventor, especially when trying to do intense designs as well and customize the software for user interaction. I know what i want to do in Solidworks just can not get it to do it, or takes more steps than usual, and clicking the Check mark or esc is driving me CRAZY !!! also have experience using Pro E, which is now Creo, actually that is where i started.

 

just need to get more in depth into the creating of custom parts. i have the software and a 3d printer, mainly printing PLA :)

 

I feel your pain in regards to SolidWorks. It doesn't seem as intuitive as Inventor. On the other hand there are some tasks that are

easier.

 

In regards to bondo and the top coat. Yes, generally all I am trying to do is fill any imperfections and mask the layering. Most of the bondo and first

primer coat get sanded away in the process. The idea is to get a good finish on the pattern so it will pull cleanly from the mold.

 

On my early wood patterns, in many instances I used a coat of shellac rubbed down with steel wool to seal and fill the wood before the finish coat.

Below is a set for the valve shrouds for a Wisconsin model "A" in a 1917 FWD truck. For this set I imported the model into Fusion 360 to generate the tool

paths then exported the G-code to Pathpilot for our CNC milling machine.

 

Best regards,

 

Terry

 

 

IMG_0982.thumb.jpg.2562ab4170ad9071b5819537f0f1c1bd.jpg

 

Below, are the castings along with the original piece we used for reverse engineering.

IMG_1668.thumb.jpg.ba6c46f5a68ddfbd3b66f7ba2e3688cb.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

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lol, yeah perks on both sides

 

how are you casting hollow parts, are you printing/making a core as well ?? or pouring solids, then removing all the material ??

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26 minutes ago, BearsFan315 said:

lol, yeah perks on both sides

 

how are you casting hollow parts, are you printing/making a core as well ?? or pouring solids, then removing all the material ??

 

I fabricate core boxes. These are filled with core sand and once cured the cores are bonded together

and placed in the mold and accurately positioned using the core prints.

 

In this photo the patterns have already been rammed-up in the drag (lower half of the mold) - excuse me if I get these reversed! The drag has been flipped over and the

other half of the patterns placed. Next the sand will be added and rammed-up to form the cope or top half of the mold.

The pattern will be pulled and the gates, runners etc. will be cut. Then the patterns will be removed (pulled) and the cores set in place.

598075419_Tharperselbows1.thumb.jpg.a607c79657ad186f76d3d354de9b99f4.jpg

 

In the photo below is a set of cores all cured and ready to be glued together.

100_4365.thumb.JPG.b2de405ba559532df19f168ba09c36c1.JPG

 

Here are the cores (coated with graphite) positioned in the drag (lower half of the mold). These particular pour was for the intake

manifold.

1224066529_THelbowscoresinplace.thumb.jpg.83cb63a6f760ddee228d202fdc2e5ebb.jpg

 

Here is the cope (top half) ready to be placed. You can clearly see the core prints that locate the cores as well as the runners, gates

and shrink bob and vents cut.

1088672824_THelbowscopehalf.thumb.jpg.32d5f977ea02c19b311a3efced4451c8.jpg

 

Here are the fresh castings with the cores knocked out.

903883356_THelbowsdecored1.thumb.jpg.6c802fdf9a41e2aa7169ed4572271e9e.jpg

 

Ready for machining and polishing!

1257494294_Tharpersmanifold2(2).thumb.jpg.e7ef4d58d122ad5da313dabfbe6e1723.jpg

 

 

 

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yeas sounds right, at work we work a lot of foundries doing large scale stuff, we have a lot of cast parts various materials, methods, etc...

 

we have old wood patterns, cores, etc.. and newer aluminum style, and even foam cores now then investment casting (wax)

 

thanks for sharing and keep me in the loop, love this kind of engineering

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Thank you for posting the details and photos of the casting details of the intake manifold. I find this all very interesting and fascinating.

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