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Can anyone help identify this old car frame


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Hi folks, found this car frame while out hiking. It was buried along with other items from the early 1900s. From my research the front suspension looks to be pre 1930s but it also seems to be the design of the era from hundreds of car makers many of them "defunked". It now sits as lawn art, any info would be appreciated.

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Edited by Cochie Canyon Dan
learning curve..... (see edit history)
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Looked on frame inside & out, top & bottom and didn't see anything. Pretty rusted though.

Also did research on vin #'s of that era, interesting stuff. After spending hours & hours comparing this frame with images on different sites i can tell that the gas tank was most likely strapped under the cross member at the rear and brackets towards the rear on each side were supports for running boards, steering box was mounted inside with linkage passing thru the frame then down to the arm. Here's are a couple more photos maybe someone might recognize front cross member, looks like an engine mount.

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Looks very similar to Chev maybe around that 1924-25 era but I’m not 100% sure of this as the extra cross member for mounting the engine doesn’t look quite right I know some Chevs had them but I have never really studied them well enough that. Anyway if I get a chance today I will have a look at my Chev book 

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A measure of the wheelbase might help. What is the distance from the front axle to where the rear axle might go - about the peak of the arch towards the rear.

 

Whatever it was I think it must have had no brakes on the front axle as I see no signs of brackets on the hubs.

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I have that exact cross member (3rd one back from front) in my garage and I was told it was off a Chevy... Here's a '27 or '28 frame speedster. Also a pic of a 1925 with the two engine mount cross members visible...

 

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Edited by Lahti35 (see edit history)
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I note also the steering box on the Chev speedster is directly above the spring mount. On our 1926 Pontiac, which has a similar frame the steering box is several inches behind the spring mount - the and those engine mounts are not there.  

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I believe your frame is for a Chevy from around 1919.  My car shown in the picture started with a heavily modified Chevy frame from around that year.  The front frame horns seem very similar to yours as does the shape of the axel.  My axel is flat like yours on top where it mates to the springs.  The back spring perch is very similar if not exactly like yours.  I will try to post a couple more pictures and see what you think.  The spring perch picture is upside down as is the frame picture.  The frame was getting ready for sand blasting.

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Edited by stretch (see edit history)
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I have aprox 8;6' from cen of front axle to rear.  

Lahti35, your 1927 Chevy speedster frame looks identical. I found the electric starter was invented in 1911 but when did it become an industry standard, the front cross member still has an opening for the crank.  

Stretch, your 1919 Chevy front end also looks identical. Could a frame design be used on different models for consecutive years?

After being buried for (I'm guessing) at lest 50 years or so the grease fitting balls still depress and have grease in them.

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One of my friends up in the Strezlekies  about 10 miles away as the the birds fly, has a 1914 Baby Grand Chevrolet  beautifully restored.   That chassis frame he says would be most likely 1925, which is the only one that has a cast iron crossmember for mounting the front of the engine.    Bob says the 1914 - 15 -16 had semi- elliptic front springs, and 3/4 elliptic at the back.  Next the 490 model had splayed quarter elliptic spring s, which gave the cars their own handling characteristics, which most people liked little .  !925 chassis were as pictured.    Most of the early Chev 4s had their own peculiar variation of crankshaft oiling  . Obviously it was intended to be an improvement on the "faith and hope" that enough oil splash would find its way in the drill hole at the top of the main bearings.  We found some thin enough flat felt sheet.   Bob sliced narrow strips and plaited them, so he could  push the top end into the oil hole on top of each main bearing.   The oil spray would saturate the plaited felt wick.

 

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