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2 hours ago, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

I would just install new rings. Probably outlive you.   If possible, , five or ten thousandth over and file to fit.

 

  Ben

Ben, I installed standard rings and my compression was at almost 40 and I had blue smoke coming out of the odd bank’s tailpipe. 

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1 hour ago, Fleetwood Meadow said:

Ben, I installed standard rings and my compression was at almost 40 and I had blue smoke coming out of the odd bank’s tailpipe. 

 

 Well, something is not adding up. I did many ring jobs in the '50s with that kind of wear.  You have a problem somewhere else, me thinks.

 

  Ben

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well I took the engine apart and did my measurements again. Pretty big taper so I bought the Lisle 15000 cylinder hone. I read a lot of stuff about dry honing. This seemed contrary to common belief but I thought alright I’ll try it. Plus the instructions said I could. Got the #6 cylinder back in round and almost got rid of the concaved ridge at the top where it seems the piston rocked. Took the rest of the night off feeling proud of myself.
 

Had my friend come over to see the progress. I was doing great on a new cylinder and then I hit the bottom of the cylinder where the crankshaft sits. It broke the stone. So I replaced them and started again. No idea how the drill got locked because I didn’t have the trigger pulled all the way down since I was trying to keep around 300-400rpm. Well it got locked and hit the bottom again, which stopped the hone, but since it was somehow locked it spun the drill out of my hand. Thank God I had it plugged into my overhead plug because when it hit the ground it unplugged. One of the scariest moments I have experienced in a long time. 

 

So I took a break from the honing and measured the cylinder. It was out of round and terribly tapered. Left the garage disgusted. 
 

Today I went back out with a finer stone, my final set, and took up at the cylinder again. I got gun shy about hitting the bottom so I was careful. It went great. But when I went to measure it I saw I hadn’t been going to the end of the cylinder. However, I got it back to round and the top of the cylinder is almost dead on the final measurement I was looking for. Assuming I can get all of the cylinders to finish with that measurement I’ll be great. 
 

I ordered new 80 grit stones and will try the other cylinders then order finer grit stones. The company that I am ordering the rebuild kit from says to end around 240 grit. I’m going to use an oil to hone it this time because doing it dry I keep dislodging the stones from the backing plate. Lubricating it will help with that. I just need to figure out how to keep the fluid flowing, essentially create a bath system. I’m also going to go from the inside of the engine, where the crankshaft would sit. That way I can extend the hone out the bottom, which is the top at the head, and make sure I see where the stop that I keep hitting is so I can avoid it. 
 

Pictures to come with it. If I can get this done right I have a ‘51 Meadowbrook that will show up on here too with an engine rebuild. 

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I’ve been battling that honing tool all day. I tried using oil like it said to and I wore through a whole stone in 15 minutes. I couldn’t believe it. And it wasn’t even close to round. So I cleaned The cylinder and used another stone and I got it close to my end measurement. I am trying to get to 3.8330”.  That puts it .020 over the 3.8125-3.8145” standard bore. I got the top to be within .001” and the bottom to be within .001” but every time I lower one of those spots the middle bores out. The middle is .005” oversized from the rest of the cylinder. That makes, roughly speaking, the top 3.8333”, the middle 3.8338”, and the bottom 3.8333”. It doesn’t make sense based on the tool I’m using. (Lisle 15000) How do I fix that or is that discrepancy within a reasonable difference? The tricky part for me is that I have to convert all of the measurements from the gauge from mm to in. I’m going to have to go out and get an SAE gauge so I will not have to keep converting. 

1425935D-9574-41E6-93D7-E8F89E0D6051.jpeg

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It's usually better to bore than hone when things are so out of spec to begin with. Honing stones are just for that, honing. Not boring. Honing is used just to smooth out the irregularities after boring.

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