shelbyone

rear wheel bearings

Recommended Posts

was looking for any clues in our forum but could not find any.

ordered rear bearings for both sides on rockauto; do it myself? or get it done?  ( never changed bearings before) 

ideas?!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, shelbyone said:

was looking for any clues in our forum but could not find any.

ordered rear bearings for both sides on rockauto; do it myself? or get it done?  ( never changed bearings before) 

ideas?!

It gets a little complicated doing it yourself, however, most shop mechanics don't know beans about removing and reinstalling the rear calipers on a TC without messing something up.

They will most likely ruin the piston adjustments on your calipers or may cause them to leak brake fluid.

Rear calipers are also ALMOST impossible fo find even rebuilt, however there is someone here who sells both NEW and rebuilt calipers. He'll find your post.

If you plan to do the rear wheel bearings, you may want to replace the brake pads as well, though they wear very slowly.

I may have replaced the ones on my TC, but frankly do not remember. I have had mine since 1995.

 

The factory shop manual will give you the most help.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rear wheel bearings are EASY! Do it yourself.

 

If you aren't going to replace the rear brake pads, depending on if there's a lip on the rotor, you might be able to just slide the calipers off and set them aside.

 

If you need to compress the pads to get the calipers off, you will have to use the piston retract screw. On the back of the caliper there's a little plug. Take the plug out and there's a hex-head screw in there. I'd have to look at my FSM, but turning it one direction will retract the piston and allow you to remove the caliper.

 

Once the caliper is off, remove the disc. Then remove the dust cap (flathead screwdriver and a mallet...you can reuse them if you don't beat the crap out of them). Then, remove the hub like any other old-school hub. You will need to replace the wheel seals. Clean everything up, pack the new bearings, install the new parts, put the hub back on. While spinning the hub the opposite direction as tightening the nut, tighten the nut until it's difficult to turn the hub, then back off the nut 1/4 turn, put the cotter pin and all back on. Before I lower the car, I spin the wheel, make sure it spins freely and doesn't have any "sticky" spots and that it has no lateral movement at the top of the tire.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hemi! Reaper! 

as usual - thanks for your fantastic help!

I ordered the wheel bearings and seals at rockauto....and I am confused..because I received 3 are the same, 1 is smaller...

are the inner and outer bearings the same size? ( I guess not) 

also, I need to replace both outer tie rod ends including inner ends....( that should be a poc plus getting an alignment afterwards) anything I should keep in mind doing this?

IMG_3287.jpg

Tc wheel bearings - Jul 24 2018 - 3-42 PM.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The outer bearing is smaller than the inner bearing. It looks like you got 3 inners and 1 outer. You may also find when you take it apart that the cage on the small bearings is plastic. That's normal. I personally like the metal cage bearings (like the one you have).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

all done..both sides were completely shot. was easy to get them out...now zero wobble :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/6/2018 at 2:11 PM, Reaper1 said:

Rear wheel bearings are EASY! Do it yourself.

 

If you aren't going to replace the rear brake pads, depending on if there's a lip on the rotor, you might be able to just slide the calipers off and set them aside.

 

If you need to compress the pads to get the calipers off, you will have to use the piston retract screw. On the back of the caliper there's a little plug. Take the plug out and there's a hex-head screw in there. I'd have to look at my FSM, but turning it one direction will retract the piston and allow you to remove the caliper.

 

Once the caliper is off, remove the disc. Then remove the dust cap (flathead screwdriver and a mallet...you can reuse them if you don't beat the crap out of them). Then, remove the hub like any other old-school hub. You will need to replace the wheel seals. Clean everything up, pack the new bearings, install the new parts, put the hub back on. While spinning the hub the opposite direction as tightening the nut, tighten the nut until it's difficult to turn the hub, then back off the nut 1/4 turn, put the cotter pin and all back on. Before I lower the car, I spin the wheel, make sure it spins freely and doesn't have any "sticky" spots and that it has no lateral movement at the top of the tire.

 

 

Reaper1 I am replacing the wheel bearing and hub assembly for my front wheels:  https://www.moog-suspension-parts.com/moog-518502#fitment

 

re there any tips/tricks with the process? I was hoping it would be easier than the rear wheels.

 

I plan to tackle this when the repair/service manual arrives, a recent Ebay purchase.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The front bearings are press-in units. They aren't necessarily difficult to do, but you do need a shop press. I'm sure you might be able to rig up some sort of C-clamp tool, but a shop press is the best way.

To be honest, I haven't done a pressed-in front bearing for one of our cars in so long I don't remember if they go in from the front or the back of the upright. There is a dust seal on the back that most people don't ever replace. Sometimes things are so caked with dirt and grease that you don't even know it's there! Kinda rare for that to go "bad".

 

The reason I haven't messed with those bearings in so long is that I always convert my cars to the big 11" brakes and those uprights all have bolt-in bearings. Just another advantage. You can use the later '91-up uprights with the correct caliper adapters and get the advantage of the bolt-in bearings as well as the improved roll center. I will warn that I'm not 100% sure whether the stock calipers will bolt to the newer caliper adapters. I *think* so, but I have never tried. The other thing to consider is that even if the uprights have the ABS sensor boss, it might not put the stock TC sensor in the correct position. You can always shim it out, but if it has to be closer you get into grinding...no big deal on the ABS boss, but just something to think about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now