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On ‎7‎/‎8‎/‎2018 at 8:51 PM, 32tatra said:

But this time she was driving a  blue Yugo convertible with a license plate that read " YUGO GIRL".  I saw that and said to myself, we need more girls like that!!!     

Probably because "GOGO GIRL" was already taken!!

 

Craig

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I remember a friend calling these "40,000 mile cars" - after that you junked them. It was a time when there were a raft of rice burners (Honda, Subaru,..) with 360cc engines (some kind of tax break) that gave a number a start made possible by the US government (remember a FIAT 124 sedan I drove that would buzz you to death over 60 mph but at 55 it was fine). Also we had the CitiCar made here in Sebring. Only car that failed a brake test by wrapping the caliper around the wheel.

 

And then there was the Renault Encore. Only rent car I returned because it overheated before I left the airport. (I like small cars particularly as rentals, had a lot of Hertz Pintos, but returned an Aztek because it was raining and you could not see out the back (no rear wiper)).

 

Finally don't forget Team Go: Hego, Mego, twins Wego. & sister Shego

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On ‎7‎/‎7‎/‎2018 at 5:36 PM, jeff_a said:

Now eligible for Hershey with the last coming out about 1992. The Yugo was a vastly superior car to a 1968 Subaru 360. Trying to say something nice...

 

The Subaru below was f/s @$3,900 on BringATrailer a few years ago. A former 360 owner quipped that you got the performance you'd expect from a 25 h.p. motor, but the dirt bike soundtrack almost made up for it.

 

1969 Subaru 360 Sedan

 

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Malcolm Bricklin was behind BOTH the importing of Subarus and Yugos!  

 

 

Ralph Nader never wrote a book about A car! It's been 53 years since the book was published, did anyone ever READ the book? It was aimed at the entire automotive  industry. ONLY chapter one cited the Corvair. And of course the NHSTA (a government agency that Ralph's campaign helped establish) published it's report in June of 1972 that exonerated the handling of the Corvair. ?

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On 7/5/2018 at 8:22 AM, Steve Moskowitz said:

Gosh I hate to bring this up but alas, despite the bit of fun being a DeLorean dealer I also took a gamble on Yugo.  Sold a boat load of them.  ...

 

 Thanks for that info. I had never considered the lack of spare parts on the fall of the government.

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  • 11 months later...

After a complete search on internet on Yugo I find it sad and totally disagree with all the negativity!!  I had 2 when they were almost new and had very few to no problems.  There bad reputation is undeserved as they were built with a specific purpose and most of the problem came in when the public expected far too much from a car that was priced less than half of average.  Driven with some basic care, not raced, and realizing they were only meant to go so fast and they were great.  I am now stirring up memories and have 3 to include a like new 88 gvx. Currently totally restoring 88gv. A common sense car for comment men designed for a pupose

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Yeah. They were the cheapest car in America during those years, but FAR from the worst. It was 1987! Apparently most of the people dissing them Online either weren't old enough to remember, or have forgotten what average cars were like in those days.

 

It's just a license built FIAT, 127 body on 128 mechanicals as I recall. I worked on a few of them back when they were almost new. I never thought they were bad cars.

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On 7/10/2018 at 11:44 AM, padgett said:

I remember a friend calling these "40,000 mile cars" - after that you junked them. It was a time when there were a raft of rice burners (Honda, Subaru,..) with 360cc engines (some kind of tax break) that gave a number a start made possible by the US government (remember a FIAT 124 sedan I drove that would buzz you to death over 60 mph but at 55 it was fine). Also we had the CitiCar made here in Sebring. Only car that failed a brake test by wrapping the caliper around the wheel.

 

And then there was the Renault Encore. Only rent car I returned because it overheated before I left the airport. (I like small cars particularly as rentals, had a lot of Hertz Pintos, but returned an Aztek because it was raining and you could not see out the back (no rear wiper)).

 

Finally don't forget Team Go: Hego, Mego, twins Wego. & sister Shego

Reminds me of the Less family, Help, Hap, Use and their sister Hope.

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On ‎7‎/‎7‎/‎2018 at 2:36 PM, jeff_a said:

Now eligible for Hershey with the last coming out about 1992. The Yugo was a vastly superior car to a 1968 Subaru 360. Trying to say something nice...

 

The Subaru below was f/s @$3,900 on BringATrailer a few years ago. A former 360 owner quipped that you got the performance you'd expect from a 25 h.p. motor, but the dirt bike soundtrack almost made up for it.

 

1969 Subaru 360 Sedan

HA,,,

I bought one of these brand new in about 1968.

$999.00, The dealer would paint it any color you wanted for another hundred.

I crashed mine.

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On 7/16/2018 at 12:05 AM, Frank DuVal said:

Malcolm Bricklin was behind BOTH the importing of Subarus and Yugos!  

 

 

Ralph Nader never wrote a book about A car! It's been 53 years since the book was published, did anyone ever READ the book? It was aimed at the entire automotive  industry. ONLY chapter one cited the Corvair. And of course the NHSTA (a government agency that Ralph's campaign helped establish) published it's report in June of 1972 that exonerated the handling of the Corvair. ?

I may be the only person who read Unsafe At Any Speed all the way through. In fact I read it twice. What a load of bull. Not many people know it was based on reading through GM's archives of complaints resolved and defective cars recalled and fixed.

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I  have a copy (found on the cheap book table at K-Mart) and have always thought he stared out to rail about the Volkswagon but found a safer target. Was not unusual, I recall Unca Tom doing a stoppie in a transaxle Tempest with both rear wheels tucked. He also does not mention that GM fixed the problem for the '64 model with a kludge and the 65's had a full IRS. Nader's book was published in 1965.

ps Guess I am number 2. For reading I prefer Stroker Ace.

 

nader.jpg

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On ‎6‎/‎29‎/‎2019 at 8:16 AM, padgett said:

I  have a copy (found on the cheap book table at K-Mart) and have always thought he stared out to rail about the Volkswagon but found a safer target. He also does not mention that GM fixed the problem for the '64 model with a kludge and the 65's had a full IRS.

 

 

I recall reading about the 1964 fix in Unsafe at Any Speed.  The book reported prior to 1964, EMPi, an aftermarket supplier, sold them. 

 

Craig

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True, was called a "camber compensator". Was added to '64s and EMPI had one for earlier cars. Was essentially a transverse leaf spring under the rear suspension.

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When I worked in a garage in the 80s we had a customer who commuted 150 miles a day in a Renault Alliance. Ran up over 300,000km (200,000 miles) in a few years. I couldn't believe it, but that car was serviced by the book. He came in every 3 or 4 weeks for an oil change or some other service. We had other customers who were meticulous this way and they also ran up incredible mileages without a breakdown or major repair. Usually Japanese or American cars. One customer with a Lincoln put nearly 500,000 miles on it, things were wearing out that never wear out like ignition switch or light switch. Another was given an old Toyota by a neighbor, had us fix it up and drove it for years including a coast to coast trip across Canada and up into Alaska. I guess any make can do it if you take care of it.

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On 6/28/2019 at 9:28 AM, JACK M said:

HA,,,

I bought one of these brand new in about 1968.

$999.00, The dealer would paint it any color you wanted for another hundred.

I crashed mine.

 

That's funny.... just the thought of that thing getting up to crash speed 

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19 hours ago, 30DodgePanel said:

 

That's funny.... just the thought of that thing getting up to crash speed 

 

Fell asleep (if you want to call it that) at the wheel.

Ran into the back of a parked milk truck.

I was about 19 and WAY stupid by todays standards. This was before MADD.

I had a 25 mile each way commute and figured the thing would pay for itself in time.

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In 1968 my dad bought me a 1960 Renault Daulphine for $50. The guy he got it from had traded a shotgun for it. I kept going through clutches. I was driving from northern to southern Illinois one weekend with my cousin and the temperature gauge started reading danger. I got it back home and took it to a mechanic who said there was a hole burned through the top of the piston. He got it running just good enough for me to sell it. I think I sold it for $200 to my cousins friend. I found out a guy in one of my high school classes said he had a 59 and wanted to race me but that was after I sold it. I kinda wish I had that car now. Greg.

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I had a $50 Dauphine. Parked in one of the Carolinas when it turned out to have a cracked block and forgot where. Think I still have the title

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19 hours ago, Buick35 said:

To Jack,ever hear of DAMM? Drunks against mad mothers?

 

I think most everyone has wondered how we ever made it this far.

I'm glad I got over all that,

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