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The Wide Variety of Buick Dashboard Designs


EmTee
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I was inspired by the photos posted in John D's '2500 Mile Challenge' thread.  I think that Buicks have historically had some of the most interesting instrument panel designs,  So, without further delay I'll kick it off with my '67 Riviera drum speedometer.  Now, let's see yours!   ;)

 

image.thumb.png.79929d1459d2d23cf850fc13

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I went out to the garage and snapped these three pics (you already put up the coolest one, my 67 Riviera.

Below are my 2016 Cascada,  1967 LeSabre and 1952 Special.  Mine look more like survivors than show cars but you still can appreciate the character of the different designs.

Cascada dash.jpg

LeSabre Dash.jpg

Special Dash.jpg

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Here's mine.  1915 McLaughlin showing oil sight gauge, ignition and light switch, with a speedometer.  The empty holes are for the choke or strangler cable and dash lamp yet to be installed.  Btw it is a painted board.  Regards, Gary

DSC_4418.JPG

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11 hours ago, CBloomberg said:

Below are my 2016 Cascada,  1967 LeSabre and 1952 Special.

 

I like that '52 -- I don't believe I've ever seen one of those in person!

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I am constantly surprised to learn of the number of cars that have what I call a "rolling ribbon" speedometer; like on the '59 Electra, above.  Oldsmobile used it from 1959 through 1962.  Oldsmobile called it the "Safety Spectrum" speedometer.  At one time I thought it was unique to Oldsmobile.  Ah, naïveté!

 

I wonder how accurate they are?  I suspect not very.

Edited by D Yaros (see edit history)
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I hope more folks post up here because I love these pictures. My humble, modified dash. The guy I bought it from obviously did some changes, not all of which I like. The POS stereo he put in it is so gross and out of place I removed the face plate and will not put it in. Looking for a decent replica to install.

 

 

20180706_080222.jpg

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On ‎7‎/‎5‎/‎2018 at 8:59 PM, EmTee said:

That '59 dash is wild -- seems like you should be looking at the moon through that windshield!  "10, 9, 8, 7..."

 

More like" Ground control to major Krum. Check ignition and may  God's luck be with you. "

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If George Jetson drove a Buick this might be how he would have expected the dash to look... all digital with a touch screen to control AC, Heat Radio and more in the center... all in 1988.

 

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I received the final lot of nickel plating which has allowed me to finish my 1915 McLaughlin dashboard.  I draw your attention to the brass name plate from the manufacturer, along the bottom it says to check the battery water every ten days.  Ten days, how does an owner keep track of that, carry a calendar and write it down?  The McLaughlin plate has stayed with the car for a hundred years and is in pristine condition, has to be a miracle.  I think it is a neat detail.  Regards, Gary

 

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4 hours ago, cxgvd said:

I think it is a neat detail.

 

I agree!  Makes me wonder about people who can't manage to change their oil every 7500 miles -- or especially those who can't wait to own a self-driving car...   :unsure:

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14 hours ago, cxgvd said:

I draw your attention to the brass name plate from the manufacturer, along the bottom it says to check the battery water every ten days.  Ten days, how does an owner keep track of that, carry a calendar and write it down? 

 

I have my Grandparents Mantel Clock which is a windup spring run unit. It runs for 10 days when fully wound up. Perhaps things like the battery check were timed around something like this as a matter of habit? 

Like I imagine driving your '15 Buick would be, a different time. 

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Here's a decent shot of the 1940 dash, compare this to the '39 and you will see no holdover to the design.

585562804_1940Buicksteppedbyradius1.jpg.b20fa7710301537d710588513562333b.jpg

 

On the speedo, it is of interest to see that the 1939 Buick went to 120, the 1940 only to 110 and the 1941 range went back to 120 mph.

1940-buick-roadmaster-dash-det.jpg.9871b5c2342c7e480e645f44754eca4e.jpg

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Here's the 1942 Dash below.  The radio controls were moved to the upper part of the dash possibly to improve the line of sight between the road and the distraction of the radio.  The left and right instruments for engine function are lowered and the speedometer position is raised.  

 

Notice the foot operated ebrake?  that was new for 42.

42 dash 2.jpg

 

Similar engine turning on dash panels and with a painted dash and a similar center console layout to the 41 at the radio speaker.

42 dash.jpg

 

I borrowed these pictures from a sale advertisement.

 

 

Edited by kgreen (see edit history)
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1948 dash, best view I could find.  Again the layout and finishes appear to be a reuse of the 1946-47 dash.  The engine gauges and speedo are redesigned for a simpler less cluttered appearance and from what I can see, use brushed aluminum backgrounds rather than plastic.

1948 dash.jpg

Edited by kgreen (see edit history)
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1949 dash, stylistically updated.  The engine instruments, speedometer and radio controls share the same priority in the line of site.  The dash panels are painted in the case of these two examples, the same color as the exterior body color.  

1949 - Copy.jpg

1949 dash - Copy.jpg

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5 hours ago, kgreen said:

1948 dash, best view I could find.  Again the layout and finishes appear to be a reuse of the 1946-47 dash.  The engine gauges and speedo are redesigned for a simpler less cluttered appearance and from what I can see, use brushed aluminum backgrounds rather than plastic.

1948 dash.jpg

 

 This "symmetrical" style was used by several manufacturers. Same dash for right and left hand drive.  Just change glove box door with instrument  cluster.

 

  Ben

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5 hours ago, kgreen said:

The 1950 dash layout in this example seems to return to the pre-1949 style.  

 

681640792_1950dash1.jpg.f84f3b99081b53a139ab338d857182b7.jpg

 

In this photo the 1950 dash may be from a higher series car as the finishes appear to be upgraded.

839194146_1950dash.jpg.7b28eff926ebd3f1b3242328c8869ba7.jpg

 

 

 

 1950 Special, dash upper and lower are the same color.  Super and Roadmaster are separate color upper and lower. Note the clock is not in the upper dash as in the pre '49.

 

  I have seen some pictures of '50s, first series Specials, which seemed to show the rectangular knobs, ala pre '49, instead of the round ones.

 

  Ben

Edited by Ben Bruce aka First Born (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

 

 This "symmetrical" style was used by several manufacturers. Same dash for right and left hand drive.  Just change glove box door with instrument  cluster.

 

  Ben

That makes a lot of sense, thanks for pointing that out.

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