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Hi Guys 

many of you know how much I love 50s ,60 s and 70s American,  well I’ve come to the Istanbul Classic Car Show and I’m in my dreamworld , amazed these Turks love American to . I’m here as a club member so managed a pre opening walk round . Being a Buick man recognised those , but down to you guys to let me know if I’ve spotted anything special . Classics are very expensive here what’s 60 k in states is 170k here,  but the standard of restoration looks very high,  Hate to think what the Mercs  and jags cost

taken loads of photos so will post over next few days , enjoy 

 

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Bhigdog 

apologies , disappointed me to, I came here with bunch of Turkish Cypriot guys who talked like they were up for risky time , belly dancers etc , but come 11 last night they all went to bed !

Mind you they know how to drink , Raki and more raki , my head was buzzing when I took photos , accounts for the bad focus on some.?

few more beauties here 

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Edited by Pilgrim65 (see edit history)
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In the 1950s, there was a photo of President Eisenhower  on a State Visit  having a ride in Mustafa Kamal's V12 KB Lincoln.  ( My parents continued a subscription to National Geographic for probably 40 years from when they

visited Canada and USA in 1937-8).     What happened to the Lincoln of Turkey's war hero ,  President, and founder of their democracy?   That should be centerpiece of every car show there.  

They visited a big Trade Fair that was in Ottowa or Toronto.   At a time when every family in Australia washed their clothes by hand, my mother was obsessed with the latest Show Special deal on the Beattie stainless steel  washing machine  .   The roller wringer would reverse if something jammed, and the forward/reverse bevel gears were zinc diecast did not have great life expectancy.  When the washing dried on the outside line, you could lift off the wringer and slip on the wide electrically heated drum ironer.  My mother ironed even socks, undercl;othes, handkercheifs and face washers.   With this deal there was a step ladder, a stool, and ironing board and rolling pin,, and a pastry board  . Full price was 40 Pounds,  delivered anywhere.    My father asked the attendants if the delivery was indeed, ANYWHERE.    They conferred.   Where did he live?  At a town called Moe,  in the Australian State of Victoria.   After more discussion , they said "Yes".  "That will be No Problem".   The whole lot was waiting for them when they arrived home.  My mother would have nothing but a Beattie washing machine when the original; needed replacement over 25 years later.  I apologise for the non-automotive content.  It does show you how people lived and thought then.

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Saw one of the best classic cars I’ve ever seen here a 1930 Cadillac 16V original , must be one of the best and expensive cars here.

mind you I expect the bat mobile original from film is worth a few bucks , post photos shortly 

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Edited by Pilgrim65 (see edit history)
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My guess is that the car with wicker baskets on each side at the rear looks a bit like 1903 Ford or Cadillac . They had similar origins.   If you had a chance to lie on the floor and count the cylinders you would know.  If you saw it running you might know, too.  Ford with  a "boxer" twin cylinder arrangement should thump and vibrate much less than Cadillac's horizontal single.      My friend David Dryden, who lives about 20 minutes away,  has superbly restored examples of the first three Ford models; the A of 1903, the C of 1904, and the interim model like the A but with slightly larger bore.   If that car is a 1903 Ford,  I understand that the wicker basket storage indicates an early A.   My knowledge of David's cars is limited by the infrequent need for original components to be rebuilt with thermo-spray coatings , and subsequent machine grinding to size/fit.

You always have to appreciate  why cars were built the way they were.  I have a 1913 "copper pot" Cadillac project;  and I would liken them to the early Rolls Royce as a triumph of workmanship over design, only more so.   You could liken Cadillac design to that of farm machinery, but built with absolute precision and care.   I do not have the computer skill to define the detail where there should be identifiable differences in your photos compared with other photos of cars.

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23 hours ago, Ivan Saxton said:

My guess is that the car with wicker baskets on each side at the rear looks a bit like 1903 Ford or Cadillac . They had similar origins.   If you had a chance to lie on the floor and count the cylinders you would know.  If you saw it running you might know, too.  Ford with  a "boxer" twin cylinder arrangement should thump and vibrate much less than Cadillac's horizontal single.      My friend David Dryden, who lives about 20 minutes away,  has superbly restored examples of the first three Ford models; the A of 1903, the C of 1904, and the interim model like the A but with slightly larger bore.   If that car is a 1903 Ford,  I understand that the wicker basket storage indicates an early A.   My knowledge of David's cars is limited by the infrequent need for original components to be rebuilt with thermo-spray coatings , and subsequent machine grinding to size/fit.

You always have to appreciate  why cars were built the way they were.  I have a 1913 "copper pot" Cadillac project;  and I would liken them to the early Rolls Royce as a triumph of workmanship over design, only more so.   You could liken Cadillac design to that of farm machinery, but built with absolute precision and care.   I do not have the computer skill to define the detail where there should be identifiable differences in your photos compared with other photos of cars.

 

An easy way to tell from the front is the Cadillac used a larger radiator mounted at an angle, which is what we see here.  Ford radiators were vertical.  Also, if you zoom in you can see what looks to be the trademark Cadillac scroll on the side of the sleigh front.  Agreed though, unless you have the right angle to see enough detail it can be difficult to differentiate between the two.

 

 

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This is why I love this forum. Everything from thermo-sprayed parts to the Batmobile to Ivan's mother's Beattie washing machine to a retractable for VL to a V16 Cadillac coupe that (that is still a coupe) to Istanbul.

If someone asked me if I thought there might be old American cars in Turkey, I would envision a few old junkers, patched together with rags and 2x4s like you would see in Cuba. This is eye-opening.

 

Thanks to all for all the great times over the years. 

 

Bill

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