kgreen

1940 76C Reconstruct

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Nice work, Ken.  I particularly like what you are doing to make sure the grill fits right, that's dedication!  When I feel overwhelmed by the relatively minor cosmetic things I'm doing to my car, I look at threads like this to marvel at the challenges others are willing to take on! 

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23 hours ago, kgreen said:

Floor repair at heater:

 

Seems that the bolts froze requiring a previous owner to manhandle the heater removal.  The floor has captured nuts so the heater is placed over the hole on installation and screws installed from the top of the heater.  The retained nuts were ripped out and the old metal where the captured nuts were supposed to be located were cut out.  You can see the butchered metal on the left near the vice grips.

 I had almost exactly the same situation on my '41 Roadmaster. Not quite as bad though.

 Keith

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On 8/15/2019 at 1:41 PM, kgreen said:

Floor repair at heater:

 

Seems that the bolts froze requiring a previous owner to manhandle the heater removal.  The floor has captured nuts so the heater is placed over the hole on installation and screws installed from the top of the heater.  The retained nuts were ripped out and the old metal where the captured nuts were supposed to be located were cut out.  You can see the butchered metal on the left near the vice grips.

 

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I removed the captured nuts from a parts car for replacement here.  Below, the captured nuts are installed and welds ground smooth.  

 

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Small but essential detail.

I had the same problem. Couldn't find any cage nuts locally so I used rivnuts instead. I figured it's under the car so wont be seen

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11 hours ago, neil morse said:

Nice work, Ken.  I particularly like what you are doing to make sure the grill fits right, that's dedication!  When I feel overwhelmed by the relatively minor cosmetic things I'm doing to my car, I look at threads like this to marvel at the challenges others are willing to take on! 

 

Neil, thanks for using the word "marvel" in your interpretation of my effort.  You are very kind. 

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Body work is 99% complete.  Tweaking the wheel shields (fender skirts) and rear bumper stone guard which are originals purchased from @2carb40 (Thanks yet again Greg!).  The car is in primer stage and blocking.  The car is fully assembled including underside panels like stone shields so that anything that can affect body panel alignment is in place for verification of final assembly.  Since the doors were totally reconstructed, the window frames and crank mechanisms and ventipanes will be installed also to be certain that everything will line up after paint.  Paint isn't scheduled until winter sets in with low dust and humidity and Dan's ability to control heat and airborne moisture content.  The car will be totally disassembled with the body put on a rotisserie for ease of painting, sanding and finishing.  Everything will be painted separately.  Originally Buick painted the body with the doors and I believe the deck lid installed.

 

At this point, everything except the window frames and ventipanes is in for replating.  For replating, I found Rick at R&D Finishing.  He used to do all of Lewis Jenkins plating.  

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Edited by kgreen (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Den41Buick said:

Nice car. Have you decided on colors yet?

Yes, I have after months of looking at other cars.  Of the other 76C's out there I've seen blue, green and cream colored.  I don't have a full accounting though, but I've chosen maroon with a tan top and interior.  Also thinking seriously of keeping it as authentic as possible and simple with no accessories like fogs, grill guards, spots or other such possible options.  

Edited by kgreen (see edit history)
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Wow, this is really looking terrific.  Can't wait to see it come together!  What a beauty.

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Ken,

Excellent choice in the color and top (I am biased). The color looks the best, in my opinion, in bright sunlight. It can appear to be more towards brown in dark lighting. Fantastic looking work so far, can't wait to see the final product. 

Mike

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First of all, this past month was rewarding in that fellow Buick owners stepped in to help me, and for that I wish to offer my sincere thanks and appreciation.  

Anderson Pearson (1941 76C) responded to my request by photographing parts of his car and even going the extra mile with minor disassembly to show details.  Anderson has also provided documentation for me on parts with dimensioned drawings.  Thanks Anderson!

Neil Morse (1941 76S) enlightened me to important details on the differences between 1940 and '41 instrument font.  Neil also offered then sent me extra instrument parts that I can use.  Thanks Neil!

Matt Harwood (multiple cars) provided photographs and details of parts associated with the convertible top mechanisms.  Matt is very willing to offer help unsolicited with his thread on his '41 limo and solicited such as with my PM's.  Thanks Matt! 

Greg Johnson (1940 56C, plus others)  Greg continues to be a significant help with his knowledge of this era of Buick and with parts that he has found or hidden in his stash.  Greg spent his time finding a great condition, useable glove box door for me.  I've already got well underway with four other glove box doors only to find irregularities that became glaring once polished.  Thanks Greg!

Unknown (1940 56C) Dammit! I have lost all contact, recollection and correspondence trails with a gentleman out of Michigan who sold me convertible top cylinders out of his car.  He had years ago modified his car to use hydraulic cylinders and kept the original pneumatic cylinders in his garage.  He sent me a photo of his car (beautiful) along with the cylinders.  I did thank him at the time of the sale, but regret having lost his name.

 

This past month's work involved a lot of behind the scenes details that won't be seen when the car is complete, but extremely important for operation of the convertible top mechanism.

 

The cylinder mounts were frozen, not allowing the cylinders to pivot.  The cylinders that came with the car were missing their top cap and the interiors were rusted beyond recovery.  I had gone to a great extent finding materials and methods to remanufacture cylinders with little success.  Later, I found a parts car convertible that had cylinders but the ones I purchased from the gentleman in Michigan were in great shape and looked like they were less than five years old.

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We also remanufactured the top cover plate over the cylinder assemblies.  The originals were bent, torn and generally manhandled in attempts by previous owners to make some sort of repair.

 

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Edited by kgreen (see edit history)
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I was fortunate to have acquired a convertible parts car that was largely complete, at least sufficiently complete enough to recover restoration details.  The rear seat back support and convertible top well shelf were reconstructed this past month.  Metal supports along the wheel well and floor of the car were added then new plywood parts cut and fit in place.  I wasn't aware that plywood was in use before the war as I had done enough work on post war built homes to see 1x6 deck sheathing used for the roof and floors to falsely lead me to believe that plywood was not created until the 60's.  The parts car that I have was located in south florida and had been infested with drywood termites.  Drywood termites fly and do not need to return to soil for needed moisture.  They are becoming a common problem in Gulf coast states and California as they can fly into an attic and devour the interior of a wood structure but leave the wood appearing undamaged.  All that is visible will be piles of sawdust.  The plywood in my parts car looked great, but crumbled like paper mache when touched.   

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