Roger Walling

Oiling a frame to prevent rust

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 I am  considering filling one end of a frame with  600 weight oil and let it flow out the other end in an attempt to slow down the inside rust on a frame.

 Has anyone had good results doing this?

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I worked in the restoration shop at the Canadian Museum of Science and Technology . The mandate for preservation was 100 years minimum.For motorcycle frames 

the method was to fill the frames with linseed oil.  Probably too expensive for a car frame.  If you use that do not leave soaked rags around as they can self ignite.

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While I suspect it would be better than nothing, Ospho would be a better choice although perhaps a bit harder to work with.

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On this topic, are there any experiences using a hydrophobic foam to fill hollow steel structures such as in a frame or rocker panels?  

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There are some interesting products that spray on like penetrating oil and turn to grease.  I think this is one I used...If anyone has worked on a Porsche 911 they are notorious for rust in the bottom of the windshield frame.  I used this grease to seal the inside after it was repaired and painted, 30 years and no rust yet...  

 

http://www.clairemfg.com/content/red-spray-grease

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I have used Fluid Film on the frame of my truck the last few winters. It has slowed/stopped the existing rust and prevented new rust from starting.

I know of several people that use this product on the frame of their trucks in various states that get snow with similar results. Each spring when I put my all season tires on my truck this stuff is still there doing it's job. If you do use this stuff BE SURE TO FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS carefully especially the CAUTIONS for use.

 

Fluid film comes in aerosol cans,  one gallon and five gallon cans.

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That red spray grease looks like a good product.

I use a fish-oil based product inside my restored chassis, AFTER all of the paint is done. Dedicated air gun with a long thin hose tipped with an adjustable spray nozzle. The part I don't enjoy is drilling fresh access holes in the bottom of the chassis cavities. Some chassis have enough holes from the factory.

 Heat the fish-oil to reduce it's viscosity.

And we've all heard about the guy who pumped 4 gallons of used sump oil into his E- type Jag chassis. There was a hole opening into the floor behind the seats....

Edited by Bush Mechanic
Addition (see edit history)

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Used engine oil can be acidic. Maybe not a good thing to use. It is toxic to some degree to you too so best not get it on yourself.

 

The Fluid Film looks good - it is a lanolin based product. We have a local company (ProLan) making lanolin products to do just as you ask, similar to Fluid Film. The stuff is sprayed on and the volatile carrier dries out leaving a greasy or waxy film of lanolin compounds. At Fieldays last year they had a tipper ute on which they had sprayed the unpainted tipper chassis with it and rain was just beading and running off. No rust in the rain.

 

The old standby of course was fish oil. Smells, runs and leaves a dark oily dribble, which is a wetting agent and will hold all dust that comes into contact with it. If there are modern alternatives, they should have volatiles that dry to leave a non-wetting surface so dust doesn't stick to it.

 

Altex Coatings in Tauranga make a product called RIPO = Rust Inhibiting Penetrating Oil. It is a thin oil-like liquid that you paint or spray on and the volatiles dry out, leaving a waxy, somewhat hard surface that encapsulates rust and prevents air and moisture getting into the metal. I have used it on rusty Dexion and it works. We are high humidity and my tools and spares rust readily in the shed; the Dexion still looks the same though. I imagine you can''t find that over there but there may be a similar product.

 

I would imagine you would use a spray nozzle like a mushroom, that directed fluid in a circle of 360o from the nozzle. They are used for spraying underseal.

 

https://fieldays.co.nz/

https://altexcoatings.co.nz/frontend/index.cfm

http://www.prolan.co.nz/

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)

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Spinneyhill, you are right regarding the spray nozzle. It sprays in a 360 degree pattern. You slide the spray nozzle in to the end of the chassis cavity, then withdraw it slowly while spraying. The modern fish-oil based products dry to leave a waxy coating. Popular in the UK, but I cannot recall the name of their product, or the Aussie version, and I'm not at home to look on the shelf.

Lanolin based would be excellent, and would emit a less offensive smell than the fish-oil products.

The heavy oil that Roger applied will be better than a poke in the eye with a burnt stick.

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18 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

 

Altex Coatings in Tauranga make a product called RIPO = Rust Inhibiting Penetrating Oil. It is a thin oil-like liquid that you paint or spray on and the volatiles dry out, leaving a waxy, somewhat hard surface that encapsulates rust and prevents air and moisture getting into the metal. I have used it on rusty Dexion and it works. We are high humidity and my tools and spares rust readily in the shed; the Dexion still looks the same though. I imagine you can''t find that over there but there may be a similar product.

 

What you are describing sounds a lot like Boeshield T-9.  This product was developed by the Boeing Co. to control corrosion in aircraft.  In my earlier years, I lived aboard boats, was a charter captain and used Boeshield T-9 extensively to control corrosion in various boat systems.  I recommend it highly.

 

Here's a link to some information on the Boeshield T-9:

 

https://boeshield.com/why-boeshield/

 

Cheers,

Grog

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22 hours ago, charlier said:

I have used Fluid Film on the frame of my truck the last few winters. It has slowed/stopped the existing rust and prevented new rust from starting.

I know of several people that use this product on the frame of their trucks in various states that get snow with similar results. Each spring when I put my all season tires on my truck this stuff is still there doing it's job. If you do use this stuff BE SURE TO FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS carefully especially the CAUTIONS for use.

 

Fluid film comes in aerosol cans,  one gallon and five gallon cans.

 

I use this on my regular cars, good stuff. It's based on an oil sheep produce. Doesn't smell bad and works well here in our salty Michigan winters.

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I knew about other methods of preventing rusting of enclosed structures, such as frames, rocker panels, lower parts of doors etc.

 

Using only oil is a bad idea, because it's too thin and will quickly get out of the structure. Rather, using heated mixture of engine oil and Tovotte grease was advised by friend of mine, who's father owned an automotive rust protection shop in early 90's.


There are also special products for conservation of such parts; wax based and non - wax based. Both avialable as a spray or in cans; some of the wax based needs to be heated. And that's probably the best protection possible, as it is used by car manufacturers as a standard. Sometimes, leaving car in direct sun may cause it to start getting out through the drains; it's easiest to see on 80s VW (mostly Golf).

Non-wax based are worse - the protection level is simillar, but they smell awfully, and give "dirty" appearance of all surfaces they are used on.

 

Protecting the outer surfaces is another thing; the best idea is using some bitumine - based products (here are called "Bitex", but I'm sure that something simillar is possible to buy in US), which leaves  thick layer of black protection. It also isolates noise a little. Most important about it is that it closes all minor holes, cracks and connections - all these easy rusting places, such as trim mounts, connection of fender to body etc.

 



 

Edited by filozof97 (see edit history)

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