Surf City '38

Lost Topic - 1938 1/2t Engine Removal Project

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Finished off today....

 

1) Exhaust from manifold to tailpipe....

2) The PItA splash tin.....(am not looking forward to removing them in the future once the fenders & radiator are in)

 

Was thinking to tack a small weld to the nut side.....

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I'm not sure you have the four sets of steel slotted cone nuts and thick counter sunk brass washers in the correct places on your manifolds.

Don't they belong only on the two ends of the exhaust manifolds?

I might be wrong on the older engines....

The purpose of those special tapered cone huts and 3/8" thick countersunk brass washers is to let the ends of the exhaust manifold flex and move preventing the ends from cracking.

Some pics of this special washer arrangement. What and where they are placed.

Four .167" thick steel washers are used  at the red X's

Manifold Cone nuts and brass Washers.jpg

Cone nuts manifold washers studs Ply Dod Desoto.JPG

Mopar Flathead Six Manifold+Bolts2.jpg

MoPar 6 cyl Fattie Manifold bolts (5).JPG

MoPar 6 cyl Fattie Manifold bolts (6).JPG

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Posted (edited)

Hi Bob, very helpful for sure, I will make the adjustment.

 

Logically, the way I saw this was since the inner manifolds are not completely shouldered, meaning not a complete hole with 360 degrees of shoulder surface, then the brass and cone would spread the torque better, and this is why I placed them in the center manifold shoulders....

 

But when thinking about the effect of heat on cast iron, this makes total sense to allow the flex on the outer manifolds in relation to the inner "chunk" of cast. 

 

👍

Edited by Surf City '38 (see edit history)
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Ok Folks...Cab was installed back to the frame, so I am going to be continuing the convo here....LINK

 

 

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Need to do a bit more fine tuning on the Shell and Grill....but coming together nicely.

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Alan, 

That chassis assembly is really too pretty to cover up.

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8 hours ago, wldavis said:

Alan, 

That chassis assembly is really too pretty to cover up.

 

Agree!

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Found and installed rubber side cushion on top of the side adjusters for the radiator..and did a bit of braising...aluminum and zinc rods.

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47 minutes ago, countrytravler said:

Hi Surf. Wrong wheels? Or are they just rollers?

 

Hi Buddy, yea, I know, when I came up to see Chris she said she did not have the correct ones in the containers...bummer!

 

Actually had to purchase another '36 for the spare...just so I'd have 5 identical...

 

So I am using some '36's until I can find the correct ones...any leads would be appreciated!

 

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Radiator Shell, Radiator, and headlights, completed...Off to power test the engine in a in-frame dynamometer....after that, I am hanging tin on the sides!

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Edited by Surf City '38 (see edit history)
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The light at the end of the tunnel is getting very bright😊. great work👍.

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Boy, she's lookin' good! I like the color. On those tapered manifold nuts, I took stainless cap nuts and drilled them through. They fit perfectly into the countersunk washers. Curious, on my '36 car, the nuts were not slotted like yours! Can't wait to see it all together!

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Thanks a bunch Jim, been a long time, but finally coming together....

 

Just a word of caution on Stainless Steel....my day job is working at a food manufacturing facility, we have tons 304 18/8 Stainless, we love it at the factory because of its resistance to corrosion, and ease of welding, and its ability to take the heat (literally)....however, we never use it for structural applications due to is low strength compared to mild steel....and even less strength compared to carbon steel.

 

"Unlike mild steels, the yield strength of annealed austenitic stainless steel is a very low proportion of the tensile strength. Mild steel yield strength is typically 65-70% of the tensile strength. This figure tends to only be 40-45% in the austenitic stainless family."

 

This is due to its material make up being over 20% Chromium and Nickel....where mild steel is just that for the most part Iron and a small bit of Carbon....

 

On this build, I used all new Grade 8 bolts/nuts on the Mechanical/Safety points, when I could, but did reuse the original "specialty" nuts/bolts when I could not find a Grade 8, like in the case of the split manifold nuts.

 

Interior, I used the original when I had them and cleaned them up, or found exact modern duplicates, if the originals were too far gone with rust.....

 

So when choosing stainless versus mild or carbon steel, keep in mind what the bolt/nut is doing and choose the material based on the job performed.

 

I try to be true to the original, but I have to bend to modern material when it makes sense.

 

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Thanks for the info and I am aware of the differences. Almost all vehicles of the time used low carbon fasteners, mostly what would a grade 2 in today's standards.Up to about the early '40's, many of the automotive fasteners had thicker heads, now, some of the stainless have heads so thin one can hardly get a wrench on them. I have used stainless nuts in other exhaust applications, mostly for preservation's sake with no adverse effects.My original cone nuts were so badly rusted they could not be reused. I also use brass nuts too in some heat related assemblies. I agree that stainless , bolts in particular, should not be used where there is any stress or certain torque values required as they have no real structural value. I tried to save as many of the original marked head bolts myself for originality where the fasteners can be seen. My biggest issue with stainless fasteners is that they are all manufactured offshore and the tolerances have become so lax that galling, especially when disassembling a tightened bolt, the threads will gall making it almost impossible to get the fastener loose. In fact, I'm not sure that any bolts or nuts are made in the USA any longer. Even 30 years ago, when I worked for a local industrial fastener house, we had to import most all of our fasteners from Canada(INFASCO brand) ! They don't even make nails here anymore!

 

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Hi Alan:

 

Really looking nice. Looks like you are on the downhill side of this. 

 

Take care

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