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DOOR lock replacement 1942 Special Deluxe


PHLN

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Very new to collector car world. Just starting our project car which is a 42 Plymouth 2 door coupe. Need to pull lock assembly out so local guy can rekey the locks. I am Having trouble getting the retaining screw out of the door so I can have the lock re keyed. It’s easy to find but the screw won’t move at all. Tried penetrating oil. Not sure the screw is original. 

 

Any ideas? 

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Welcome to the AACA Discussion Forum. The best (and probably cheapest per ounce) solvent is a 50/50 mix of Automatic Transmission Fluid and Acetone. Any ATF will work. I found that disassembly of a 1938 Buick that had been sitting outside in the Northeast for over two decades was much easier after application of that solvent mix on any bolts or screws that were stuck. My suggestion is to squirt it down with the solvent, let it sit overnight, and then remove it. 

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If it is like my 1952 Plymouth at the edge of the door parallel to the lock cylinder there is a small flat opening.  The cylinder is held in by a clip that can be pulled  back toward  the door edge by a screw driver or hooked tool  The cylinder is then just pulled out from the door. No need to remove the rest of the latch unless other issues exist. The service manual gives a very detailed explanation for this operation.  As I often do I suggest you post here:  http://p15-d24.com/page/index.html  if you need more help.  Very knowledgeable people about early Mopars there

Edited by plymouthcranbrook (see edit history)
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I pulled my 1941-1946 Chrysler Shop Manual and these years use a set screw rather than a clip.  Your photo is hiding where the set screw is located.  It's at the door edge at the weather strip, behind the lock rotor in your photo.  It's above the two large lower screws that hold the latch assembly.  Again,  you don't need to remove the entire latch assembly to pull the lock cylinder.

 

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