carmover

25 Buick fuel problems

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If the portable tank indicates it is not the fuel feed, I would change the condenser and if the problem still persists, buy a new coil and try that.

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6 minutes ago, Fred Rawling said:

If the portable tank indicates it is not the fuel feed, I would change the condenser and if the problem still persists, buy a new coil and try that.

Fred, I am thinking the same thing,The coil and condenser have never been replaced and as I said before the plug wire set and cap got pretty oily while I was running the engine with the valve cover off adjusting valves.I cleaned the cap but the wires appear to be oily and discolored.I am using Bob's yellow wires.The cap has a small chip on the lower edge not close to the firing parts.It won't stay running long enough to check and see if it is arking fire around the cap or wires.

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If the portable tank indicates it is not the fuel feed, I would change the condenser and if the problem still persists, buy a new coil and try that.  

 

One of the BCA members near me uses a 1972 El Camino condenser in his 1923 6 cyl. .  he says he has no problems.   That may bve a good place to start for ease of finding a replacement.

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A crude but easy way to check for "leaky" plug wires is to start engine in total darkness and move plug wires around with an insulated object. I have done this numerous times to help locate voltage loss in ignition wires and caps.

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2 minutes ago, raydurr said:

A crude but easy way to check for "leaky" plug wires is to start engine in total darkness and move plug wires around with an insulated object. I have done this numerous times to help locate voltage loss in ignition wires and caps.

Two weeks ago I found a similar method in broad daylight while trying to diagnose a miss under load (OK at idle) in a 1919 Pierce dual ignition with old wires.  I attached a modern inductive timing light, powered by a 12V small sealed battery used for GPS, first just above the distributor cap towers and then near the spark plug terminals.  Near the cap, at idle, the idle noticeably slowed upon connection.  In this Dual Delco system, there are two 6-cyl caps, one with wires to the right side plugs, the other to the left.  Not surprisingly, the cap and wiring tray (insulated metal loom) closer to the exhaust manifold had the worse results.

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2 hours ago, Grimy said:

Two weeks ago I found a similar method in broad daylight while trying to diagnose a miss under load (OK at idle) in a 1919 Pierce dual ignition with old wires.  I attached a modern inductive timing light, powered by a 12V small sealed battery used for GPS, first just above the distributor cap towers and then near the spark plug terminals.  Near the cap, at idle, the idle noticeably slowed upon connection.  In this Dual Delco system, there are two 6-cyl caps, one with wires to the right side plugs, the other to the left.  Not surprisingly, the cap and wiring tray (insulated metal loom) closer to the exhaust manifold had the worse results.

 

Do you mean it slowed down when you put the inductive pickup on?

 

I could really use a battery powered timing light that doesn't freak out and lock up every time it encounters a prewar car with solid wires. What is it? Does it have dialback?

 

 

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43 minutes ago, Bloo said:

Do you mean it slowed down when you put the inductive pickup on?

 

I could really use a battery powered timing light that doesn't freak out and lock up every time it encounters a prewar car with solid wires. What is it? Does it have dialback?

Bloo, this is a late-1970s Craftsman inductive timing light with a plastic body. I've had issues with the metal-bodied light on older cars.  When the inductive pickup was attached just above the cap towers (to see if there was a steady spark being sent to the plugs), the idle faltered--not a dead short of that cylinder, and an irregular strobe resulted.  This was a hotel parking lot diagnosis on a 5-day tour based out of Sequim (generally your neck of the woods).  The intermittent short effect was minimal at the far end of the wires near the plugs, BUT this was a no-load test.  The owner is attending to replacing the plug wires before the Pierce-Arrow Society annual meet in Rohnert Park CA next month.

 

This light does NOT have dialback.  I'd used it on my 1930 roadster a week before in the same manner while diagnosing an occasional miss at idle.  In that case, one spark plug was at fault.

 

The 1919 Pierce in question had recently been acquired by a WA collector from a static collection, and the plug wires were decades old, smaller than 7 mm, and although not visibly broken were dried out in their high-heat location below the exhaust manifold.

 

I get a lot of use out of about three sealed 12V batteries which were designed as backup batteries for home alarms and for gate openers.  I run an 11-year old Garmin GPS off such a battery, connected by a Radio Shack cigar lighter intended to be connected directly to a 12V battery.  I cut off the alligator clips and soldered on female push-on connectors to fit the male push-on connectors on the battery.  The battery rides on the floor in a plastic Folger's coffee can.  This set-up is easily moved from car to car, and feeds the GPS for about five days without a recharge.  I prefer using my Sun 820 machine but (1) its timing light is not inductive, and (2) it's anything but portable. 

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A very fine mist from a spray bottle with water in it works very good for checking cap and wires.

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5 hours ago, Grimy said:

Two weeks ago I found a similar method in broad daylight while trying to diagnose a miss under load (OK at idle) in a 1919 Pierce dual ignition with old wires.  I attached a modern inductive timing light, powered by a 12V small sealed battery used for GPS, first just above the distributor cap towers and then near the spark plug terminals.  Near the cap, at idle, the idle noticeably slowed upon connection.  In this Dual Delco system, there are two 6-cyl caps, one with wires to the right side plugs, the other to the left.  Not surprisingly, the cap and wiring tray (insulated metal loom) closer to the exhaust manifold had the worse results.

I checked it tonight in total darkness and it is jumping fire around the distributor cap.It is a pretty strong ark.I didn't see any arking around the plug wires.I am going to put my old cap back on and see what it does tomorrow..It looks like it may be arking where the chip is on the cap.

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Next time you do a darkness test , be sure to watch for arc where the wire come into contact with each other. The arc is hard to catch without separating and moving the wires around while running. Also remember plug wire covers can cause problems once installed. Good luck.

Edited by raydurr (see edit history)
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