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playswithbrass

To pay or not to pay?...

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If you get a free t shirt and lunch.. Not bad for 15.00.. I would pay it..

 

I talk to some  of the  old  guys . They will never pay to show the cars..

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Edited by nick8086 (see edit history)

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In our state, South Australia, we have many shows but the icon event is the “Bay to Birdwood” which is a run from West Beach to Birdwood in the Adelaide Hills, home of the National Motor Museum.  The run usually takes 90 - 120 minutes or sometimes longer and travels through suburbia, the city and the hills.

 

One year, vehicles built prior to December 1959 are eligible and the next year, vehicles from 1959 to 1981 are eligible. The event attracts hundreds of vehicles from local , interstate and overseas entries. Entrants are also encouraged to dress up in period costumes too, which is quite a sight.

 

The enjoyment from mixing and seeing sooo many cars at the start, and the streets lined with people all out to see YOUR CLASSIC OR VINTAGE CAR and the opportunity to then park in the grassed paddocks around the museum after the run and see the cars you missed!

And all this for about AUS$70.00 unless you wish to enter for judging, which is more!

 

I think the fact that it is a run and a car show combined makes it much more enjoyable than just parking your car at an oval for the show. And seeing all those people on the footpath with their deck chairs and coffee and breakfast, all rugged up, kids waving madly gives a great feeling to be “on display”

 

I entered my 1963 Buick Riviera for the first time last year and can’t wait to do the run in my 1938 Buick Special this year. Photo is from one of the camera spots located on the route.

 

 

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I don't know much about this. I just give my Wife the flyer and she sends in whatever is required. Check? I dunno, same with club renewals.

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16 hours ago, keiser31 said:

I remember when our car clubs were invited to put on shows at the shopping centers around San Diego. We usually got some free lunch or something along those lines. Now, we have to pay to show our cars, so I don't. 

 

I agree with the original poster.  Age has nothing to do 

with standing for principle.

 

From what I hear of our AACA region's history, they used to

have a show at a local shopping center.  The shopping center

PAID THE CLUB!  After all, we were providing the attraction

that benefited the businesses.  The amount we received in

the 1950's was $50, which is the equivalent of $400 to the

club's treasury today.

 

In more recent years, a nice local garden center had a

car show.  It was free to car owners, and each car received

a nice plant as a thank-you.  That is just how it should be.

 

I don't mind paying to enter a car when a car club is hosting it.

The registration fee pays for dash plaques, trophies, goody bags,

and so on.  What I dislike is the number of non-car organizations

that have found that they can CHARGE THE CAR OWNERS for

providing their entertainment, and therefore make money from

the car owners.  Do those same organizers charge the band for playing?

 

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I don’t care what other people have to pay. I only care what I have to pay.  If it’s something I think is reasonable, I do it.  If spectators don’t have to pay, good for them I guess.

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46 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

What I dislike is the number of non-car organizations

that have found that they can CHARGE THE CAR OWNERS for

providing their entertainment, and therefore make money from

the car owners.  Do those same organizers charge the band for playing?

 

 

I 100% agree

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I have sometimes voiced the same complaint Peter.I guess it boils down to whether you think the show is worth going to in the first place.I don't like the idea of being used as a pawn to draw customers to a business,but I do enjoy decent shows ,usually sponsored by service clubs to raise money for charities. Cripes,the last show I went to (service club,by donation) cost me thousands of dollars and many hours of my time ! A casual conversation led to the purchase of my '25 Buick coupe.

Jim

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Rusty I like your idea of putting put out a collection box for visitors. We will add this next year.  Because of fund raising events our club is able to donate $5-10K each year split between Hospice and a local home for "at risk" children.  When I moved to College Station nine years ago I was attracted to this club because they "do something" other than drive to a local hamburger joint once a month.  Like many of you I do not enjoy sitting in a lawn chair behind my car for 5-6 hours but would be happy to donate $20 at a free show.  Xander, I love you cars, will you be on the Glidden this year?

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I get it about not wanting to pay to show your car. But think about what others have said about the cost associated with a show as opposed to a free cars and coffee type event. 

I help put on a 3-day house trial for years. We worked for 4-5 months building cross country jumps. A lot of the material but not all was donated and a sponsor name was put at the jump, a lot was not sponsored. We needed about 120 volunteers that we provided lunch and a tee-shirt and/or a hat. We paid for portable horse stalls. We paid judges travel and hotel expenses, we paid for portable potty’s and garbage pickup. We paid the police department for traffic control and an ambulance. We paid for advertising and insurance. We sponsored a children’s mental health program with a set donation and passed the hat among the free entry spectators. We donated what was ever left over to the forest preserve. 

We drew participants from all over the USA, even from Europe and Australia. One year we had a group from Brazil as this event was a warm up for the Olympic trials. 

The entry fee started at about $200 when I first started helping 30 years ago and grew to about $600 12 years later when I stopped doing it. We averaged 300-325 horses entered. 

The year I stopped helping was the year the head organizer decided to not sponsor the charity and  the excess funds that were donated to the forest preserve (usually around $7500)  would go into the LLC’s account for expenses during the year. It was a one man LLC. He also started charging $5 for soectator parking. Two years later he announced it was the last time for the event due to for lack of entries (had less than 150 that year),volunteers, sponsors  and spectators. He lost a lot of money and the word was people were willing to support a good cause but not greed. A very good event that supported some very good causes and provided a venue for riders, a special time for spectators to get close to an Olympic level sport was gone. 

As much as we hate to say it — money provides opportunity in a lot of different ways. Support those programs you can afford to do and enjoy, if they have a good cause they are sponsoring. Just my 2 cents for a good cause. 

Dave s 

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I have been going to car shows as a spectator and/or car owner for over 20 years now. Most brand specific car shows in my area held in controlled access venues charge BOTH spectators and car owners for admission. Usually car owners do pay a little more $$$$. Until I started going to Fall Hershey, the concept of free spectator admission (except at cruise-ins or small car show charity events) was something I seldom experienced.

 

As a car owner I will be the first to admit that the concept of charging someone to bring their car to a show seems illogical.  After all, without cars there is no show, right?  However, given the costs to put on a show, some of which benefit the car owners themselves (trophies & give-a-ways to car owners), why shouldn't the car owners help with the costs?

 

17 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

This isn't about graft or corruption or show-runners taking advantage of the participants to get rich at their expense--the only people who think that are people who have never worked to put on a car show. 

 

For a number of years I have helped a friend with a brand specific car show that is as large or larger than Fall Hershey when it comes to cars on the show field. The logistics, costs and legal issues involved would literally make most people's head explode. Sadly now-a-days many if not all venues REQUIRE proof of liability insurance coverage from a show's promoter. The amount of coverage varies but that coverage can easily be in the MILLIONS of DOLLARS  and cost $1000s of dollars to purchase. Sadly, the cost of this insurance has increased due in no small part to the violence we have seen here in recent years at various public events. The violence at events has also driven up the costs for event security and EMS coverage. 

 

FYI, most car show promoters I know are NOT getting rich from their car shows. Most consider it a good year if they break even or make a little $$$ after expenses. Many of these people are car guys doing it for the hobby and fellow enthusiasts. A few years ago a local brand specific car show faded away after 25+ years when the original promoter grew tired. A couple of years after that,  a car enthusiast friend of mine wanted to bring the show back because he didn't want it to fade away forever. He approached myself and a number of other enthusiasts/owners of the brand he knew and trusted asking our help. Long story short this event has been growing every year since it came back. Oh, BTW, the friend of mine who promotes it makes very little, if any $$$$ from this event. He and the entire volunteer staff do it for the hobby and other enthusiasts. FYI, this event charges show cars $25 and spectators $18. Those costs do not seem to prevent 200-300 show cars or 3,000 to 4,000 spectators from coming back each year.

 

17 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Our local club puts together a Father's Day show where the entry fee is $25. We get 450 cars every single year and it sells out by mid-May with 10 or 20 people after that asking to be let in even though it's full. The venue also charges spectators an entry fee. Nobody complains. Everyone has a nice time. Great cars show up. People regard the awards we hand out as prestigious. I'm sure the venue is making a shaitload of cash off the event ($12/person x 4-6000 people). Do I care? No. Why should I? I'm having a nice day with my friends in our old cars. I feel like I get my $25 worth. In fact, it often costs me a few hundred bucks, since I bring four cars, I pay for lunch for my family, dinner for my family afterwards, refreshments during the day, etc. Still worth it.

 

Someone I know put on a car show on Father's Day for 25 years.  EVERY SINGLE YEAR this promoter donated ALL the proceeds (after expenses) to local charities. He and his staff spent 1000s of hours EVERY year on this show and got ZERO money out of it for themselves. Did I care that it cost $25 to put my car in this show. Nope.  Did the other 300-400 car owners that came every year care about the cost? Nope. Did I care it took me time and $$$$ to get my car there and back? Nope. I went to support this event and spend time with people I have come to know over the years. Did the promoter appreciate that all the car owners and flea market sellers came to this event? You Betcha he did and he told everyone so.

 

17 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Why does the value of everything always come down to money rather than how an activity benefits you in other ways, regardless of cost? You couldn't pay me enough money to replace what I get out of this hobby. I'm very sad that more people don't feel that way. 

 

Amen brother.^^^^  When I first started going to AACA Meets years ago it was about the car show. That soon changed for me. Since then, AACA Meets have been an opportunity to see different places in this country I have not been to. More importantly, it is an opportunity to see other AACA Members I have come to know, spend time with them and meet other members and get to know them. Do I care what it costs to attend a meet? Not really because it is not just about the costs or the show for me. Will I decide to go to a meet based on whether or not I have to pay for trailer parking? Nope. 

 

There is no easy answer to this situation. Some larger events have been able to secure the help of corporate sponsors to help pay the bills. Unfortunately, many local car shows do not have many opportunities for this source of income. Going forward some sort of spectator admission will have to come into play at shows that do not currently charge for this in order for some events to financially survive.  BTW, I do not have enough fingers and toes to count the number of car events that I have seen fade away here in the Northeast USA in the last few years. I would need a few more people for that.

 

I suppose the bottom line for car owners is that they should support the shows/events they enjoy. It is their choice when it comes to how they want to spend their $$$$.  At the same time, car owners that do not support certain shows then have no right what-so-ever to complain when that event fades away. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

What is the Glidden?

 

The Glidden Tour is a 5-day tour, held in a different place

in the country each year.  It is hosted in odd-numbered years

by the Antique Automobile Club of America, and in even-

numbered years by the Veteran Motor Car Club of America.

It is now for cars 1942 and prior.

 

AACA has several different tours, each set for certain ages 

of cars, so that the cars can travel at speeds comfortable

for them.  The Glidden has been around longest.  The original

Glidden Tours were endurance events held in the first decade

of the 1900's to prove the reliability of the automobile;

their revival as pleasantries for antique-car fans began,

I believe, in 1946.  And they definitely are pleasant and pleasing!

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Sounds like fun, I do not have a pre-42 automobile. They might change the 1942 year cut off, once they see how much beer can be hauled in a Hudson Big Boy. 

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On 5/12/2018 at 12:57 PM, keiser31 said:

I remember when our car clubs were invited to put on shows at the shopping centers around San Diego. We usually got some free lunch or something along those lines. Now, we have to pay to show our cars, so I don't. I show it every day when I drive it and I don't have to pay. Why do I have to pay to PARK it? I know....there are trophy fees and such (I don't do trophies), but things have definitely changed.

 

9 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

I agree with the original poster.  Age has nothing to do 

with standing for principle.

 

From what I hear of our AACA region's history, they used to

have a show at a local shopping center.  The shopping center

PAID THE CLUB!  After all, we were providing the attraction

that benefited the businesses.  The amount we received in

the 1950's was $50, which is the equivalent of $400 to the

club's treasury today.

 

In more recent years, a nice local garden center had a

car show.  It was free to car owners, and each car received

a nice plant as a thank-you.  That is just how it should be.

 

I don't mind paying to enter a car when a car club is hosting it.

The registration fee pays for dash plaques, trophies, goody bags,

and so on.  What I dislike is the number of non-car organizations

that have found that they can CHARGE THE CAR OWNERS for

providing their entertainment, and therefore make money from

the car owners.  Do those same organizers charge the band for playing?

 

 

Way back in the dark ages (1970s) when I was activities chair for the Chesapeake Region AACA, "shopping center meets" were a big fund raiser for us. Members attending with a car would get a lunch ticket and the region got some cash. The merchants got to advertise that there would be antique cars to draw the public in to their stores and there usually was a pretty big crowd of shoppers on those days. Seemed like a win-win situation.

 

Where I live now there is an annual car show in the center of town early each summer. The goal of the merchants sponsoring the show is the same it was back in the 1970s in Baltimore: Draw in the public to the stores. But they charge the antique car owners about $50 for the privilege of providing the old cars that draw the public in. I refuse to pay to show my car at an event designed to raise money for a business. I'll do it raise money for a charity. I'll do it to raise money for a car club. I won't do it to raise money for a for-profit business.

 

But there seem to be plenty of old car owners who will pay to show their cars under those conditions and as long as a business can charge car owners and still get enough cars to draw the public you can bet they will do it. Why not convert an expense to a revenue stream? Make perfect sense for the business(es). I just don't see how it makes sense for the car owner(s).

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The only show that I attend is sponsored by the Boy Scouts for benefit of their Troop.  It's been going on for years and now attracts 250+ cars, all of a very high standard, mainly because the Scouts and their adult advisers are truly glad that you are there and do everything possible to make your day a pleasant one.  By contrast, one of the big three national service clubs also sponsors a car show in the area and it is obvious that its members could not care less if you are there or not as long as they have the entry fee.  I'll go to that show every five or six years to see if anything has changed, but nothing does even though I've repeatedly communicated with several presidents of the club stressing its shortcomings and urging a more welcoming stance by its members.  After all, it's their fundraising event and they should care.  I will not attend this year even though the venue is less than 5 miles from my home.  Pet peeve:  Shows that charge to display, but offer free spots for cars older than a certain age.  This should be an all or nothing thing, either all entrants pay or none pay.

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I don't go to many pay to show events. I do go to several that are for good causes that manage to make a fair amount of money with free or very cheap registration. They make the money selling food, silent auctions, sponsors, 50:50 drawings, etc. They also tend to be my favorite shows because they don't have blaring canned music but live music, just amateurs but usually pretty good.

 

As far as free for older cars and charge for newer, which is harder, getting a pre 1940s car to a show or a 60s to 80s or newer car. I was involved with a club that let pre 1932 cars in free to try and get more early cars for people to see. They also had the lowest fee for a show around so the free cars were not saving a lot, but that class grew from a couple of cars to a whole row and sometimes a second row. I heard people say that were going to bring their newer car but liked to get in free.

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We went to the Rhinebeck Car Show last weekend here in Dutchess County, NY.  We had a great time, cost was $20 to drive onto the show field and that price included my wife and son as well. We parked and walked around the show field, had lunch, walked around some more and left. I used to put the lawn chair out behind my vehicle and "camp out" for the duration of the show, I don't do that anymore... I get more enjoyment now with my youngest son who has taken an interest in vintage vehicles, so we walk the fields and check out all the different types of vehicles - he's really enjoying it !

14859.jpeg

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In addition to helping our local AACA put on the June downtown show ( and I wonder if this discussion is even talking about AACA shows, since AFAIK, they ALL charge to enter and spectators are free) I also go to a show down in Centerville, VA (Goochland County Centerville) in September, called Field Day Of The Past. Lots of old steam machinery, buildings, etc. The spectators have to pay to enter the field, just like a State or County fair, but on Saturday of the event, "they" want old cars to show up for a car show within the other activities, so the cars get in free, along with the drivers and a passenger. There is a small fee if you want to "show" the car and try for a trophy. No charge to park with those "showing". Once the car is parked, you can roam the grounds doing fun things, like watch a steam sawmill in action and sit in your lawn chair when your legs are tired. . I go every year. ?

https://fielddayofthepast.net/

 

So, I do both, help put on an AACA show that has to charge the cars to enter to cover costs (like every AACA show I know of), and I go to a show that charges spectators and lets the cars in free. If youse guys are near Virginia, I suggest you go to both! ?

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The way I see it, we car guys put on shows because we enjoy it: We get a pleasure out of showing our cars to each other and to members of the public. Given that, it makes sense that we pay to put on the shows. 

 

Another way to think of it is that this is our outreach to the next generation of car owners.  An old car show might be just the thing to wow that kid or teenager into thinking that someday he just has to get an antique car.  Without that show, that kid is a lot less likely to see the cars that make his heart go pitter patter.  So in that sense shows are our way of carrying on the hobby into the future, and $10 or $20 is the price we pay to help make that happen.

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I am an old car collector. I've been doing this for about fifty five years. During that time I've seen the best of it when cars could be reasonably restored and there was always a ready market for a good car. Speared on by the Boomers the apex of the hobby was in the late eighties and the nineties. Like everything else what goes up must come down, and so too has the vibrant hobby. If we were talking about the stock market we would call it a correction. If it's really necessary to stop the downward spiral by paying for a venue, I get it, but does the price have to be so high. I can see $5 or maybe $10, but such a large part of our hobby is old and on a fixed income, we are being forced out of the activities of the hobby, before we should be ready to go.

 

Nobody who puts on a car show, has ever asked me what I can afford to spend to display. The numbers that I see today makes me wonder if the venue providers are interested in me and my car, or is it just about the money. So many people worry, so much, about the future of the hobby, but what they should be really concerned about it's health today. Many of us have been the backbone of the hobby for decades. Shouldn't we be allowed to continue until we can't do it anymore?

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I am an old car collector. I've been doing this for about fifty five years. During that time I've seen the best of it when cars could be reasonably restored and there was always a ready market for a good car. Speared on by the Boomers the apex of the hobby was in the late eighties and the nineties. Like everything else what goes up must come down, and so too has the vibrant hobby. If we were talking about the stock market we would call it a correction. If it's really necessary to stop the downward spiral by paying for a venue, I get it, but does the price have to be so high. I can see $5 or maybe $10, but such a large part of our hobby is old and on a fixed income, we are being forced out of the activities of the hobby, before we should be ready to go.

 

Nobody who puts on a car show, has ever asked me what I can afford to spend to display. The numbers that I see today makes me wonder if the venue providers are interested in me and my car, or is it just about the money. So many people worry, so much, about the future of the hobby, but what they should be really concerned about it's health today. Many of us have been the backbone of the hobby for decades. Shouldn't we be allowed to continue until we can't do it anymore?

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I only hit the shows with free entry or that's attached to another thing (like an antique show) so I get something for my entry fee... Am I a cheap SOB?.. nope, just think its backwards to pay to show a car that brings in a crowd that pays to see the cars. Double dipping baby!

 

In my area if people stopped going to shows that required an entry fee I bet they'd drop that fee pretty quick!

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I'm like most people here - I don't like to pay to show my car. However, I will go to 2 or 3 shows per year where I have to pay simply because I like the venue.

 

I do like the idea of letting early cars get in for free or a reduced rate. Travelling  to a car show 20-40 miles away in my 1921 Franklin takes a certain commitment that '65 Mustang or  '69 Camaro owners don't face. And when I get to the show, I'm usually the only Franklin there. Opening the hood quickly draws a crowd. I get to talk a lot about Franklins and hear about lots of uncles who had a Franklin on their farm.

 

But you know, these cars shows are not really for the old cars. They're for the hot rods, Corvettes and muscle cars. 

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I have my business name/logo on the side doors of my cars. So going to shows is a form of advertising for me. I do not mind paying a fee, because I know that someone has time and leg work in putting it together. If the show is in the middle of a parking lot, on asphalt, with no shade in sight, in the middle of summer. I will go once. Put a show in a nice setting, where a person can get a bite to eat and sit down and have a drink/beer. Walk around and check out local stores/shops, I will go back. This picture was taken at the Coeur d'Alene show here in Idaho. That is my  52 Hudson Hornet that I used to have. It was fun parking it next to the little British cars. And I was parked right in front of the cafe/bar with outside seating, that is a good show. Can not tell you the entry fee, it does not matter, money well spent.

Coeur d'Alene June 2011 032.JPG

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