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starter -generator manual DELCO D-44 -45 - 46- 47-


sligermachine
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When I bought the 1925 Buick the guy said he would look for the manual's . here is one of them I just found a box at my machine shop full of stuff that got covered up some how in my office .I keep thinking  man no 1925 manual,s but all of the other year's are covered !  For the other Buick's I have 

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Edited by sligermachine
out of order (see edit history)
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Kyle,   The main difference between  the earlier S/G   pre  1921,  and the later  22 - 25  is the orientation of the armature and commutators.   The earlier had the commutators  on the distributor side of the s/g,   where as the later had the commutators at the back of the s/g  ( much easier to get to )

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2 hours ago, Terry Wiegand said:

There was a DIFFERENT Starter/Generator unit used on the 1918 6-Cylinder models from what Kyle has posted here.  Some of the intricate details changed.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

 

 

Thanks, I won't print it out then

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On 5/1/2018 at 2:24 AM, ROD W said:

I didn,t  realize the mailbox coils  also incorporated the condenser/capacitor

I have a few like this but look in bad shape but found one to run my 1925 in the pile that worked nice blue spark . But will have to watch out some I have seen in the past the coil would get hot after some time and . AS HEAT GOES UP IN electricity SO DOES resistance so it stars not working Can't Change physics even if you want to --kyle

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  • 1 month later...
On 5/3/2018 at 2:17 PM, sligermachine said:

I have a few like this but look in bad shape but found one to run my 1925 in the pile that worked nice blue spark . But will have to watch out some I have seen in the past the coil would get hot after some time

 

These mailbox coils have the resistor at the front of the coil.   The resistor limits the current flowing through the coil when the points are closed  so the coil will not get too hot.   In this coil, the resistor is broken and a external ballast resistor has been added.  If a newer coil is used,  ensure there is a ballast resistor in place.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I plan to use a modern 6 volt coil in my 1925 Buick.  It sounds like I need to also have a ballast resistor.  Any recommendations on a ballast resistor?  Make and model would be helpful.   Lots of 12 volt stuff out there and I want to get something appropriate for my 6 volt system.   Thank you,    Hugh 

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My very old Mallory coil on my 1923 died last year.  Had a big porcelain top with a ballast resistor wound around it.

 

When I replaced it with a modern 6V coil from the parts store near where it died, printed on the outside of the coil was "internal ballast resistor  no external resistor required"  So I just hooked it up and it has been fine.

 

Most new coils will have printed on the outside  'external resistance required' to let you know whether or not you need the ballast resistor.

 

And Leif is correct, you are just putting more voltage across the points and risk arching or burning them without the resistor which with the size of our points I would not be too worried about.

 

Image result for early mallory coil

Edited by Brian_Heil (see edit history)
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Leif and Brian, 

    Thanks for the quick response.  I just read my 6 volt coil, and it does say "no external resistor required".  Original point sets are very expensive now, and I wanted them to last.  Good to know that I don't have to buy and maintain another part.      Hugh

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  • 2 weeks later...

My '18 E-45 has been running for over 50 years on a 6 volt coil with no resistor. The original 6 V coil (missing on my car) did have a built in resistor.

I think the need of a resistor depends on the coil used. With a modern 6 v coil you could go with no resistor

 However, in the past I have had several daily drivers that were 6 volt and none had resistors on the coil circuit.

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chas1963,

I bought the manual from Kyle to put into my extensive reference manuals collection.  Since you have a 1919 model, this particular manual would not really help you all that much.  I have a reference manual titled INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CARE OF 1918, 1919, and 1920 DELCO SYSTEMS.  This was published by The Dayton Engineering Laboratories Company, Dayton, Ohio  U. S. A.  It is 48 pages and if you would like, I could have this copied for you at a very reasonable charge.  PM me if you are interested and we can go from there.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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If you make a copy for Chaz1963, I could use one too. I'm going to have mine rebuilt and I'm sure the guy could use it. "Day's Repair" in Kinderhook NY rebuilds all starters and generators at reasonable cost. That's all they do, repair starters and generators only.

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Regarding the 1918, 1919, and 1920 Delco Manual -

Here is what I am going to do.  Because of the heighth and width size of this manual, it cannot be laid flat  and get all of the material on both pages.  So, that leaves only one alternative - scan one page at a time.  I need to get our new printer, copier, scanner, and fax unit set up to do scanning.  We need to get our IT guy over to get things going.  Bear with me and I'll get this scanned and then I can send it to whomever wants it.  This will be a lot quicker and definitely a lot more economical - as in free.  I am glad to help anyone who is seeking technical information.

Have a great 4th.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out Doo Dah Way

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