Jrbrks

Tire replacement questions - 1929 Model 135

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Thanks,

 I hope tire don't become the next "oil"

All the help is great.

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I have been running Firestones on Packards - nice tire and love the period tread pattern. 

 

Interesting discussion on Custom Classics - they use to be a fabulous tire - sounds like various "runs" over years have decreased their quality.

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I have been running Firestones on Packards - nice tire and love the period tread pattern. 

 

Interesting discussion on Custom Classics - they use to be a fabulous tire - sounds like various "runs" over years have decreased in quality.

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I have been running Firestones on Packards - nice tire and love the period tread pattern. 

 

Interesting discussion on Custom Classics - they use to be a fabulous tire - sounds like various "runs" over years have decreased in quality.

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I have been running Firestones on Packards - nice tire and love the period tread pattern. 

 

Interesting discussion on Custom Classics - they use to be a fabulous tire - sounds like various "runs" over years have decreased in quality.

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On 6/10/2018 at 8:40 AM, Jrbrks said:

Am I able to use 7.00 x 19 tires on a 1929 Model 135?

 

I do not have sidemounts.

 

I have the wood wheels with collapsible rims.  The car currently has 6.50 x 19.

 

Would the 7.00 x 19 be any more difficult to mount than the 6.50 x 19 on my current collapsible rims?

 

Thanks

I would not put such a large tire on a 135. The only reason it works well on the 163, is the larger fenders. I think they would look too big on your car.

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20 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

I have been running Firestones on Packards - nice tire and love the period tread pattern. 

 

Interesting discussion on Custom Classics - they use to be a fabulous tire - sounds like various "runs" over years have decreased in quality.

 

I put Custom Classics on the rear of my truck back in the sixties when Bob Green was selling them.  They were worn out in7500 miles.  Bob said that the rubber was compounded for long term appearance properties rather than tread life.  There is nothing special about that tire, the Lee mold was the only 6.50x19  in existence back then and there are photos from the thirties with them on cars (as well as other brands) so bingo, Lees are the only correct tire.  Baloney.

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Posted (edited)
On 6/14/2018 at 7:36 PM, f147pu said:

 

I put Custom Classics on the rear of my truck back in the sixties when Bob Green was selling them.  They were worn out in7500 miles.  Bob said that the rubber was compounded for long term appearance properties rather than tread life.  There is nothing special about that tire, the Lee mold was the only 6.50x19  in existence back then and there are photos from the thirties with them on cars (as well as other brands) so bingo, Lees are the only correct tire.  Baloney.

Custom Classics:  Whitewalls with 3 rings - 20 years and 6K miles on them and still had "tits"  - and then won CCCA Primary 99.5 points (they came from Lucas Tire if I recall).  Bought 2 more and next owner ran car another 16K miles before putting on 2 new fronts.

 

By the way, the difference is we have a race shop here in town that specializes in problematic alignments:

Performance Alignment

www.performance-alignment.com/experience.htm 
Experience Performance. Bill Braucksick, Master ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) certified technician, is recognized as one of the Greater Cincinnati Area's 

 "Bill Broxic 

 

 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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I am having an issue expanding the rim, while mounting one of the new Firestone blackball tires that I recently purchased (6.50 x 19).

 

I have successfully mounted two of the four tires with no issues, other than I am very, very slow.

 

I have the proper rim expanding/rim shrinking tool for collapsing/expanding the rim (I have the wooden wheels).

 

For the current rim, I was able to collapse the rim, remove the old tire, tube and flap and install the new tire tube and flap.

 

However, I am unable to expand the rim fully with the rim expanding tool pulled as tightly as I am able or dare to pull it.  One side of the rim appears fully expanded but the other side continues to have approximately 1/8 inch overlap and will not budge further.  Moving the rim expanding tool to the opposite side of the wheel does not work.

 

Something is clearly wrong, as it should not be this difficult.  Since beginning this thread, I have repaired two flat tires and on two of the five rims and installed new tires on two other rims.  This is the first removal and reinstallation with the current "problem rim", but there was nothing unusual with this rim when I removed the old tire and reinstalled the new tire.

 

Has anyone encountered this issue?  Clearly, something is wrong, but I am at a loss.  I have now done this enough times to know that expanding the rim with the rim expanding tool is not difficult.

 

I have pictures.  The first picture shows the half of the rim that seems expanded, while the third picture shows the other half of the rim that continues to be overlapped.  The center photo shows the tool mounted on the wheel.

 

Any thoughts or advice are appreciated. I am stumped.

 

Jim

 

 

IMG_4402.jpg

IMG_4401.jpg

IMG_4405.jpg

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I would turn your tool about 180% so the arms with pivot points can do their job.

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Thank you.

 

In this case,  I did rotate the arms as you suggest, and it did not make a difference.

I should have included that information.

 

In repairing flats and mounting two new tires, I had no issue expanding the rim.

 

Only this rim is causing a problem, and it appeared fine when I removed the old tire and reinstalled the new tire.  In fact, I had been driving the car on a limited basis using the tire on this rim, and there were no issues, eg old tire and tube held air pressure fine.

 

I am only replacing the tires, because I know they are at least 44 years old and two of them were showing serious cracks in the side walls.

 

Jim

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For expanding the rim to reassemble the unit, I find it easier to use a bottle jack and two short pieces of 4 x 4 lumber rather than the rim tool.

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I have changed many without any trouble but occasionally I have had your problem.  Sometimes working around the inside of the rim from opposite the split to the side than won't slip in place with sharp hammer blows seems to work.

The GM book I have shows the spreader as you show it is for high pressure tires.  The opposite way is for Balloon tires, with the right leg close to the valve stem and the left leg a third of the way around.

One other thing that I do, if the new tire is not to be mounted right away I expand the empty rim so it doesn't get sprung.  Another thing that works most of the time is to lay the tire and rim flat with the overlapping side up.  Have a 2x4 under the rim/tire across the diameter directly under the split. If you then jump on opposite sides it will usually spring into place.  If you are unlucky the rim will collapse and you can start over. 

Good luck.

 

Edited by Tinindian (see edit history)

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Atlas Rim Tool Instructions according to Atlas:  Google Atlas rim tool, click IMAGES,  on the second row of images is an image of the factory instructions.  The tool needs a couple of different placements for all the operations.

Gordon Howard

 

 

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I will turn the spreader as both of the above folks suggest and try again.

I guess my issue is whether there is something I may have done wrong.  

 

As the rim is clearly offset at the center seam, I am wondering if it is binding somehow on something?

 

Wheaties are worth a try, but I am doubtful they will improve my skills.

 

Jim

 

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Make sure the tire beads are all the way down onto the rim. Changing the rim jack position, as f147pu mentioned is a must.

 

And even then, some brands of tire beads are a bit tighter on the rim, and/or, not as easily stretched enough, so you sometimes need to get a spoon tool, or large screw driver with the sharp edges polished off,  into the rim joint and lever it into alignment so that it will pop into place as the rim jack is forcing it out into a great circumference.  And yeah, some tires need a lot of pushing the rim with the rim jack.

 

Paul

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Here's a diagram I found online some time ago when I was looking for instructions on how to use the Rim Tool on my Franklin wheels. The first two diagrams show the labelling of the tool legs and positions on the rim.

 

Putting it back together is a mention in the paragraph about getting it a part - the paragraph that starts with "Second Operation..."

 

 

1805876453_ScreenShot2018-09-10at1_57_03PM.thumb.png.11c7a42f1edab9cb20e92e49c47d1733.png

 

Cheers

 

Roger 

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I went to print a legible copy of these instructions and for some reason got 7 extra copies.  Contact me if you would like one mailed to you.

Gordon Howard

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I want to thank everyone for their thoughts, suggestions and advice.

 

It has really helped, as I now have all four new tires mounted.

 

There is some issue with the “problem” rim, I provided pictures for above.  It appears slightly twisted and can not be fully aligned, even with the tire completely removed.  It just seems a little bit off center (or something??).

 

When I mounted the tire on a different rim, I had no issues.  It did help to rearrange the rim tool for expanding the rim, as suggested above.

 

For the “problem” rim, there was nothing I could do to get the rim to fully expand and mate properly on both sides.

 

Thanks again for all the terrific advice.  

 

While I am somewhat slow, mounting new tires, tubes and flaps on these collapsible rims is not that difficult for a complete novice, once you have access to the information in this thread.

 

I may see if I can locate a tire or wheel repair shop that could evaluate my “problem” rim and perhaps adjust it to be useful, once again.

 

Jim

 

 

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1 hour ago, Jrbrks said:

I may see if I can locate a tire or wheel repair shop that could evaluate my “problem” rim and perhaps adjust it to be useful, once again.

 

 

I guess it's too late now, but it might have been worthwhile measuring around each rim if you closed it before putting the tyre and tube on - see if they were the same circumference between the one you couldn't close with the tyre on, and one that you could close with the tyre on.

 

Roger

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I think there are too many good rims available to worry about repairing one. Also the cost of repairing the damaged rim would probably cost more than another rim would cost. I'm sure there are many club members that would help you obtain another rim.

 

Bill   

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FYI,

For Franklin Club members, there is a reprint of the Pacific Rim Tool Company instructions at the Club's website, in the members only section. It's in "Franklin Service Station Newsletter". - the third category down under "Franklin Publications".    It's Franklin Service Station #156, June 2017, pages 4 thru 7. 

 

Rather detailed on how to deal with problem split rims. Worth printing off a copy to keep with your rim tool.

 

Paul

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13 hours ago, Jrbrks said:

I want to thank everyone for their thoughts, suggestions and advice.

 

It has really helped, as I now have all four new tires mounted.

 

There is some issue with the “problem” rim, I provided pictures for above.  It appears slightly twisted and can not be fully aligned, even with the tire completely removed.  It just seems a little bit off center (or something??).

 

When I mounted the tire on a different rim, I had no issues.  It did help to rearrange the rim tool for expanding the rim, as suggested above.

 

For the “problem” rim, there was nothing I could do to get the rim to fully expand and mate properly on both sides.

 

Thanks again for all the terrific advice.  

 

While I am somewhat slow, mounting new tires, tubes and flaps on these collapsible rims is not that difficult for a complete novice, once you have access to the information in this thread.

 

I may see if I can locate a tire or wheel repair shop that could evaluate my “problem” rim and perhaps adjust it to be useful, once again.

 

Jim

 

 

 

Sometimes the rims go out-of-round, or get twisted and that makes them difficult to get a tire on and close. A comparison of the diameter at several points around the rim will tell you if it's gone egg-shaped.   I've had to reshape a few "pothole customized" split rims and snap rings over the years to get them to close properly.  Any shop with a hydraulic press can bend it back to be a near-perfect circle so it's usable again.

 

Paul

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)

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