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Plugs and wires


Top0369

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Hello to all!

 

I am upgrading the distributor on my 1964 Buick Riviera to an MSD (mfg# 8524) and would like to know is anyone has done this. If so, which combination of plugs and wires do you recommend for this setup?

 

Thank you

Edited by Top0369
I did not include vehicle make and model (see edit history)
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Why waste the $$$ the "Nail" distributors are basically bullet proof. I rebuild, re-curve & install electronic ignition in stock dist. I very much like the Taylor Spiro Pro universal wires I cur myself for a much neater appearance. I used to use the Bosch single platinum plugs, but are not available any longer. I have used NGK iridium plugs with a .045" gap.

 

 

Tom T.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, telriv said:

Why waste the $$$ the "Nail" distributors are basically bullet proof. I rebuild, re-curve & install electronic ignition in stock dist. I very much like the Taylor Spiro Pro universal wires I cur myself for a much neater appearance. I used to use the Bosch single platinum plugs, but are not available any longer. I have used NGK iridium plugs with a .045" gap.

 

 

Tom T.

 

 

 

Thank you for the insight Tom. I am not much of a motor-head, but learning fast.  

Eric

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17 hours ago, jframe said:

Tom, so you recommend a .045" gap with a Pertronix? That's what is in my 65, but I think I may have gapped my NGK's only to .037 or .038.

I would think the plug gap should match the output voltage of the secondary ignition setup. My understanding of the Pertronix is that the basic kit simply substitutes for the points with no change in secondary voltage output as compared to stock. I recall they also offer a high output coil which should boost secondary voltage output and may dictate an increase in the plug gap. But I dont convert any of my cars, they are still all point setups, so I`m not necessarily up to speed regarding what product Pertronix is currently offering.

 

  Tom Mooney

 

In the `80`s I worked as a fleet mechanic for a large company with an old, large fleet. This company had a thorough maintenance program and kept their trucks forever. At some point we converted the older trucks with points to a system which was available back then called "Perlux". It operated on the same principle as Pertronix. We saw no improvement in terms of reliability as the Perlux had a tendency to melt if the ignition key was left in the "on" position. We probably saw some reduction in maintenance but the downside of that is there was really no troubleshooting to be done with the Perlux, we just replaced everything. At least with points, we could do some troubleshooting on the side of the road, and selectively replace components.

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21 hours ago, jframe said:

Tom, so you recommend a .045" gap with a Pertronix? That's what is in my 65, but I think I may have gapped my NGK's only to .037 or .038.

My mechanic set my spark plugs to .045" when he converted my 68 to Pertronix with their matching coil.

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Funny thing is, somebody went to the trouble to put in a Pertronix kit, but the left the ceramic block wifed in at the firewall. Is there a way to do away with this, since the car now has electronic ignition?

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2 hours ago, jframe said:

Funny thing is, somebody went to the trouble to put in a Pertronix kit, but the left the ceramic block wifed in at the firewall. Is there a way to do away with this, since the car now has electronic ignition?

The factory system has the resistance built into the wiring via a "resistant wire" so there was no ballast resistor as you are describing. Who knows what happened over the years? Maybe the resistant wire went bad and someone wired in a ceramic ballast resistor? Or maybe someone wired in an additional resistor because they had no idea what they were doing? Make sure you have the Pertronix recommended voltage at the "+" terminal of the coil with the ignition key in the "on" position.

  Tom

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if you want the best, go with a "Dave's small body HEI".  You send him your stock distributor and he converts it to all American made HEI parts and retains the detached coil.  Looks totally stock, but lots of power and super reliable.  Don's do the MSD, you'll regret it on a stock car.  The best wires on the market are the MSD Super Conductor's.  Zero measured resistance and you'll actually feel the difference when you put them on.  Buy the universal set and cut to length for clean install. Good luck!

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