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A FILM SHOOT NEEDS CARS!


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Is there a contract involved? I know a guy who did a beautiful restoration on a '32 Mack dump truck that got used in a movie. When he got his truck back, they had painted his beautiful green truck to a battleship gray. Between possible damages and in this case, defacing it, don't do anything unless you've got a contract.

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A fellow club member took his Model T to NYC for a shoot several years ago - sat at the curb for 18 hours, got $100 and was left on the cutting room floor after all that.

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The movie industry is ripping off car collectors. We've been getting $300 per day where I live, and think about it -- it's just not worth the risk, the time off work to deliver the car, etc. Not when a gallon of paint costs more than $100 these days. My own experience -- car wasn't used once (I was paid anyway), and the car was driven 20 miles without my permission or knowledge another time. We should be demanding and getting $2,000 a day at least, with a written contract, to even begin to make this worthwhile.

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I know a couple of people that rent their cars for the movies. They also came up with their own contract. From what I can remember, they get $500 per day, they drive their own car & get paid as a movie extra, $1. per mile from the time they leave home & back, and if the car is damage by the movie company, the company has to pay to have it fixed. Car & driver did a spot on their TV show on my 36 Packard 1404, I did that for a "free lunch", and it was fun to do, (I would do it again if they want to) After I did that spot, I was contacted by a studio that wanted to use my car in a movie, they told me it paid $100 per day, after I stopped laughing, I told him one of my tires cost more then that and I was not interested, he told me that was the going rate, & I told him for that I would rent them my 85 Seville if I can get it started. When the movie companies are making millions on the movies, they can fork out some to the car's owner. Christopher, there's a lot of actors out there, and more & more showing up each day, not that many prewar car, and they're not making any more.

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I have a reasonably well-maintained '38 12 cyl Packard Formal Sedan, which I have owned since the early 1950's. I have from time to time down thru the years, participated in a number of communications-media events. Without fail, my car has been treated by the production entites with FAR more tenderness than I give it ( I drive it the way it was designed to be driven...HARD ! ).

I do have a couple of cautions. YOU ARE UN INSURED if you participate in any commerical activity, under most policies. Therefore, unless you FIRST have in your POESSESION a properly ENDORSED "Certificate Of Coverage", specifically naming you, from the production company, I strongly recommend suicide.

DONT LEAVE YOUR CAR ALONE...EVER. Under the union contracts with most media entities, the union has the sole and exclusive right to drive your car when you are not present, and the shooting is not actually in progress. This means there is an excellent chance that a gorilla with the intelligence of a cabbage, will be slamming your car around.

The typical rates paid by production companies in the Los Angeles area, for a high dollar pre war collector car, usually exceed $300. per day. SOME of the fringe benefits I have received over the years, are incredibly good lunches, lots of time to BS with other collector car owners while we stand around (most of the time at a photo shoot will be spent doing NOTHING...getting bored to tears).....plus...several "calendar" and/or tool catalogue shoots, where I wasn't all that bored...because I had to supervise the placing of VERY charming young ladies on the fender of my car, while they had NOTHING on but the radio....

Pete Hartmann

Big Springs AZ. laugh.gif

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