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Kevin M

New Buyer Questions

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Hello everybody, I have been interested in buying a Reatta since I've known of them. I'm Trying to find one for the summer. But I have some questions my research hasn't really answered.

1. What is the going rate for a 90 coupe and Convertible? There appears to be no rhyme or reason to what I've seen.

2. Are there any major problem areas Besides the windshield, headlights and computers?

3. How different is the 4T60 from the 4T60E and the LN3 to the L27? For working on purposes

4. are these cars OBD2 or an earlier system for the computer

 

Thanks for any help

 

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Not aware of issues with computers, but you might want to add the Teves brake system to your list.

Price variance usually deals with condition, as with any car.

OBD1 in these cars.

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Thank you guys

Any idea for where there's a price guide for these cars. Or is it just what the person asks? I've seen cars in similar condition (from the ad) with prices from 2500-10000. those have been 70k-100k 90 coupes for the most part.

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Posted (edited)

Asking prices vary all over..........do your own research by going online to several sites (Google Buick Reatta for sale) 

In the past I have plotted a charts that have mileage on one side and price on the bottom.......it will not take long before you see how large the spread can be.

As you look at the cars you can also maybe make up your own rating for condition and add that to the point plotted on the chart.....maybe with enough vehicles entered you will see some trend.

I also suggest you do a different graph for the coupe and convertible as the points start to get confusing if both cars are on the same chart. 

When looking at convertibles......weatherstrip for the top is near impossible to find and if the seller knows that the price will be about half the value of the car (joke)

Allow $1000 for a new top if it needs one. (weatherstrip does not come with the top)

Teves Brakes.......they were the best system available when new, but today the problem is finding parts and someone that know the system.   Well maintained, the Teves brakes will serve you well, but many a Reatta has been for sale because

the owner was quoted very high price to repair the system so they put them up for sale and hope the buyer doesn't notice.

I would not hesitate to buy a nice car (if the price was right) with a Teves system that need repair.........but doing it yourself you could put up to $1000 into parts if everything was bad.   I think there are still a few places out there that sells

rebuilt units in the $800 range.

The 1991 is the only Reatta with the electronic transmission......generally speaking,  Reattas do not have transmission problems.

Edited by Barney Eaton (see edit history)
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Thank you Barney,  I guess I'll start making a spreadsheet of the cars I see.  One last question is there any major changes between the engines of the 90 and the series II of the late 90s?

I've had a 97 and 98 Lesabre so I'm very familiar with that engine. I'm assuming there's some small differences but nothing too crazy.

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There are more people on the forum that know the engines but greatly over simplified.......the 3800 engine from 1988 (when they added the balance shaft) to the end of production were the same.

What changed were intakes, exhaust  and external components (2seater knows these engines)  seems like there was a head change that does not allow interchangeability.  

You can drop a later engine in the Reatta and several people have installed the 3800 supercharged engine but getting it in is the simple part,  you must get the engine electronics working the BCM electronics to control the instrument cluster

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Thank you that's exactly what I wanted to hear.  I'll be back here with any other questions as my search goes on. Again thank you very much

 

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I am on my fourth Reatta and if you get the car I am sure you will be thrilled owning it. They are addicting for some and you sound like one of us. The good news is, every time and one of my 4 Reattas's have a problem I managed to be able to fix it myself with only one exception. That's only one trip to a mechanic in 4 cars. The useful information you get from this site, from www.reattaowner.com and www.thereattastore.com you can find any help you need along the way.

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Thanks again, I had forgot about that Wikipedia page lol, I'm really looking forward to owning one of these cars. With all of your help I should be on a better path than I was.

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Kevmar,

Additional info you might find interesting:

90 & 91 dash went from a CRT screen to a Digital dash

91 gave up the Teves brake system and went to the Bosch system

91 came with the next generation 3800 L27 engine (no external EGR) and the 4T60E electronic tranny

91 came with 16" wheels standard

And, from what I understand for the most part the L27 3800 from 91-93 was considered pre-OBD1; 94-95 was OBD1, 96-.... L67 3800 was OBD2

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The diagnostics subsystem on the Reatta are OBD-I, at least inasmuch as it isn't OBD-II. The technology used on the Reatta was first utilized on Cadillacs starting in 1985, was implemented on the Riviera in 1986 and adopted on pretty much all GM vehicles by about 1990-91, though the Cadillac and Buick implementations were the most fully featured for end user access. A few other cars (Olds Toronado and Trofeo notably) had this setup as well  by virtue of being so closely related to the Cadillac/Buick E platform on which it was based.

 

GM referred to it as "ALDL" (assembly line diagnostic link) as it was used for testing and verification during assembly.  There was no federally or internationally established standard communications scheme for vehicle diagnostics, each car maker had their own system for this prior to 1996. Starting in 1996, all vehicles sold in the U.S. had to meet a minimum standard for a common communications and diagnostics facility, this came in the form of what is referred to as OBD-II. Really, this was just a means of insuring all vehicles had a common set of parameters that could be easily accessed by scan tools for verifying proper operation of emissions systems.

 

Anything beyond engine/emissions operation was still largely proprietary to each car maker, though the protocol for interfacing with scan tools and other diagnostic  equipment was simplified where there had previously been many differing systems in use requiring a multitude of scan tool adapters and software cartridges.

 

In any case, if you want to access the on board diagnostics on a Reatta with a scan tool, rather than the in-car facility provided, you'll need a scan tool that supports OBD-I operation.

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Don't worry too much about price.  Find one you like and one that is in good condition with a good maintenance history.  I purchased an

88 that had been well maintained and had lived in the desert all its life.

The difference between a rust belt car and a desert car is like night and day.  Fasteners are easier to remove, body and frame rust is non existent on a SW area car,

I spent most of my life in Michigan and really appreciate rust free cars.

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I think the engine changes were pretty well covered already but a little to add. Installed in the Reatta, only the '91 had the L27 engine, and many parts will interchange with the LN3. The crankshaft is different in '91 due to the one piece rear main seal, but the rest is the same. The L27 tuned port intake manifold will bolt on the LN3 but requires a 5/8" hole be drilled in each head for the integrated PCV system or plumb an external PCV system. The L27 throttle body and the MAF are integrated in a single casting but the flowrate and frequency response are the same so the LN3 harness plugs right in. IAC is relocated but also plugs right in. The L27 does not use an external EGR either. The L27 heads are the same as LN3 except for the extra holes for the above mentioned PCV system. Many of the later model Series I 3800 engine parts right through '95 can also be used, but the Series II for '96 and up is almost completely different and very little if anything will interchange. That said, a Series II complete swap would be very possible. 

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BTW all Reattas have a built in Scan tool If you really want a separate scan tool, the OTC 2000 with a later (91+) GM or Pathfinder cartridge often shows up on e-bay. Need the GM adapter cable.

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