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At some point ugly, if carried to extremes, can sometimes claim an attractiveness of it's own making. 

This ain't it.........................Bob

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Notice these are looking like 1980's stuff. A guy with extra cash for a toy like that in the '80's would be around 80 years old or a little better today. Look for more showing up on the market.

After the first flush there will be some bargains

 

I look at that Packard and think about showing up at a Packard meet with it. I can't imagine anyone but Woodie Guthrie writing a song to document that experience:

 

"They got the fever, sun stroke, Malaria, blue moonstruck, skeeter bit, And the blind staggers"

 

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39 minutes ago, Bleach said:

It's powered by a 74 2.3L Pinto engine!

 

With any luck, it also has a Pinto gas tank...  :wacko:

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6 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

I know these guys and they're honest dealers and I would even call them friends, but I don't know how the in the world they sold this "1929 Cadillac Fleetwood" for more than $60,000. As the owner of a 1929 Cadillac, I'm having trouble even processing this thing.

 

597336_bf5917247de3_low_res.JPG

 

This is obviously the deluxe "Brinks" version for 1929. You know, with the market crash and all, one couldn't be careful enough.

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21 hours ago, Paul Dobbin said:

5aa215e4a4077_Shaycurtian.thumb.jpg.003731b8f897ae2d327e8a847371323d.jpgThere are many attempts to sell modern car to people who want the old look and not a streetrod or a real antique because they are afraid of old cars reliability and repair costs.

Try to find another plastic fender for that "Packard".

Here is another licensed Ford "Replica" that Ford wishes they never allowed their name on.

5aa2156e3c466_ShayF.thumb.jpg.2de812ae9a66c70792c1388cab688fc7.jpg

Is this a Shay replica? If so why do you say that Ford wishes they never had anything to do with it? Do you represent Ford Motor company?

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Apologies to owners and enthusiasts, but I was always puzzled by the Shay replicas--is there a shortage of Model A roadsters I wasn't aware of? What's their purpose? A slightly faster Model A? A Model A for the guy who just never learned all that complicated clutch nonsense? Model As for people who just can't live without a radio? A Model A for people for whom gravity is just too complicated?

 

Wherefore art thou, Shay Model A?

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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When Shay's were being built there was a shortage of steel Model A roadster body's . These days you can buy a brand new Brookville roadster body that is virtually identical to an original Ford body. I doubt Shay's have much value in todays market.

Greg

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Actually the Shay has a big following, with shows, rallies and parts dealers.  I found the one pictured in a yard sale about 20 years ago.  Not running (had a bad computer module)   In the short time I owned it I learned a lot about them.   Shay made the Model A Roadster and few Model A pickups, then 57 T-Birds.

Sold by Ford Dealers beginning in 1978, they were quite popular with their 4 cylinder Pinto running gear.  I felt the car was to light for the Pinto suspension and it rode roughly a the the top of the springs.  Shay had a hard time building them fast enough to fill dealer orders and there was a long wait to get one.  This led to many complaints to FoMoCo about the wait and the poor fit & finish when delivered.  I paid $3500 and sold it for $8,000 after lots of detailing, value today about $12,000.

To 90% of the public, they are "antique cars".   Technically they are eligible for AACA Shows.  I think the club has ruled on that, but not sure of the rulings results

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No Shay/way I would buy one of those, when you can pick up a real A Roadster for around the same money. https://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/dealer/ford/model-a/2077760.html    And picking up a Shay that needs restoration would really be going backwards. Buying one when they were new, might have been under restoration costs of a real one when you ad in purchase price. To buy one now for 14-18K, No Shay.

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On ‎3‎/‎9‎/‎2018 at 10:13 AM, 28 Chrysler said:

Here is the original and a replica  done by a cheesy TV program. I think they at least got the colors of the fenders about right .

Model_A-970x546.jpg

Re_Model_A_13-970x557.jpg

 

 

I think the tire color is the same also.

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On 3/9/2018 at 9:54 PM, 1912Staver said:

When Shay's were being built there was a shortage of steel Model A roadster body's . These days you can buy a brand new Brookville roadster body that is virtually identical to an original Ford body. I doubt Shay's have much value in todays market.

Greg

 

 

And you would be wrong.  NADA lists Shays at $10,050 (low retail) to $21,100 (high retail) with an average of $15,800.  That's in US dollars - it's even more in your currency.  :rolleyes:  About the same as a "real" Model A and yes, Shays do sell in that range.

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On 3/10/2018 at 11:46 AM, Paul Dobbin said:

 

Actually the Shay has a big following, with shows, rallies and parts dealers.  I found the one pictured in a yard sale about 20 years ago.  Not running (had a bad computer module)   In the short time I owned it I learned a lot about them.   Shay made the Model A Roadster and few Model A pickups, then 57 T-Birds.

Sold by Ford Dealers beginning in 1978, they were quite popular with their 4 cylinder Pinto running gear.  I felt the car was to light for the Pinto suspension and it rode roughly a the the top of the springs.  Shay had a hard time building them fast enough to fill dealer orders and there was a long wait to get one.  This led to many complaints to FoMoCo about the wait and the poor fit & finish when delivered.  I paid $3500 and sold it for $8,000 after lots of detailing, value today about $12,000.

To 90% of the public, they are "antique cars".   Technically they are eligible for AACA Shows.  I think the club has ruled on that, but not sure of the rulings results

 

 

They also built a (very) few Model A C-cab panel trucks - less than 5, I think.

 

There are some relatively simple modifications that significantly improve the ride.

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I have been wrong more than once on this forum.  I am afraid I am very hard pressed to see any real redeeming features in a Shay, however they clearly have a following. Even when they were new I failed to see anything about them that would appeal to me.  But much of this thread is about individual taste and preference. 

 

Greg in Canada

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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If I was going to spend roughly $16,000.00-$20,000.00 on something Pinto powered it would be more along the lines of one of these vintage racing sports racers.  It both goes better and handles better than a Shay. Probably a similar "rough" ride however. Remember it's all personal taste, and besides I already have enough Antique cars.

 The little blue number is for sale in Sweden so I probably won't be buying this one. There are a number of them over here as well, just have to find the right deal.

Greg in Canada

1374064472lc.jpg

1374064472lb.jpg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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On 3/13/2018 at 1:03 AM, 1912Staver said:

I have been wrong more than once on this forum.  I am afraid I am very hard pressed to see any real redeeming features in a Shay, however they clearly have a following. Even when they were new I failed to see anything about them that would appeal to me.  But much of this thread is about individual taste and preference. 

 

Greg in Canada

 

 

Fair 'nuff.  Both Shays and Model A's have their niche and following.  I've owned Model A's and I can see advantages, and disadvantages, of Shays over them.  It just PO's me when folks dis them because "they're not a REAL Model A" (and I'm not saying you did). They never claimed to be - they say REPRODUCTION right on the radiator badge.  It's ironic that Shay owners often get incensed when their cars are called Model A - "No, it's a SHAY!"  As you say, bottom line is individual taste and preference.

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1 hour ago, CHuDWah said:

 

 

Fair 'nuff.  Both Shays and Model A's have their niche and following.  I've owned Model A's and I can see advantages, and disadvantages, of Shays over them.  It just PO's me when folks dis them because "they're not a REAL Model A" (and I'm not saying you did). They never claimed to be - they say REPRODUCTION right on the radiator badge.  It's ironic that Shay owners often get incensed when their cars are called Model A - "No, it's a SHAY!"  As you say, bottom line is individual taste and preference.

If they are not fake Model A's why did the make them look like a 1928 1929 Model A Roadster from 100 feet away? Just wondering. Bob 

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41 minutes ago, 1937hd45 said:

If they are not fake Model A's why did the make them look like a 1928 1929 Model A Roadster from 100 feet away? Just wondering. Bob 

 

 

So you acknowledge they look like a Model A.  ;)

 

They were factory built under license from Ford, sold by Ford dealers, and warranted by Ford.  They were advertised as a reproduction of the Model A on the latter's golden (50th) anniversary.  From Ford's perspective, it was a marketing ploy playing on the Model A reputation to get people in the showrooms, and it did just that.

 

Current owners tend to prefer their cars be called Shay, rather than Model A, probably due to the "it's not a REAL Model A" disparagement.

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16 minutes ago, CHuDWah said:

 

 

Current owners tend to prefer their cars be called Shay, rather than Model A, probably due to the "it's not a REAL Model A" disparagement.

Glad you admit it, most of the Shay stickers have fallen off by now, so how is John Q. Public to know?. Bob 

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1 minute ago, 1937hd45 said:

Glad you admit it, most of the Shay stickers have fallen off by now, so how is John Q. Public to know?. Bob 

 

John Q. Public doesn't care. Most people would see that "Packard" and think it was a real antique car and would take the owner's word for it that it was a 1934 Packard. Things like that offend my eye, but I don't whether that's because I pay attention or because I have spent my life with real old cars. I think the general public has neither of those advantages and therefore anything out of the ordinary is extraordinary, no matter how crappy it is to people who know.

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On ‎10‎/‎03‎/‎2018 at 1:13 AM, 28 Chrysler said:

Here is the original and a replica  done by a cheesy TV program. I think they at least got the colors of the fenders about right

 

 

That must be a spare steering wheel they have got stuck on the side of the....................replica?         Or maybe it's a lifebuoy?

 

That is undoubtably the definition of ugly.     

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6 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

Glad you admit it, most of the Shay stickers have fallen off by now, so how is John Q. Public to know?. Bob 

 

 

Ummm...no.  The Shay radiator badge is riveted on - they seldom fall off.

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11 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

John Q. Public doesn't care. Most people would see that "Packard" and think it was a real antique car and would take the owner's word for it that it was a 1934 Packard. Things like that offend my eye, but I don't whether that's because I pay attention or because I have spent my life with real old cars. I think the general public has neither of those advantages and therefore anything out of the ordinary is extraordinary, no matter how crappy it is to people who know.

Thanks Matt, I'm sure there are more than the two of us with that same outlook.Bob 

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When I go to a cruise in or car show and see a fiberglass car with a crate engine and you can tell it is a built car, then it has antique tags on it!  I do not think this should be acceptable.

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