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1929 Buick Standard Head bolt torque


Larry Schramm
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Interesting I have always been a fan of center tighten and work your way out from the center.  The Buick is entirely different.  

 

You will want to recheck the torque after a short while, I check after the first engine run cycle (full hot) and then again in a few weeks.  Lots of opinions on using antisieze and other products, they do change the torques.  Check to make sure you are using the correct head washers.

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10 hours ago, Graham Man said:

Interesting I have always been a fan of center tighten and work your way out from the center.  The Buick is entirely different.  

 

You will want to recheck the torque after a short while, I check after the first engine run cycle (full hot) and then again in a few weeks.  Lots of opinions on using antisieze and other products, they do change the torques.  Check to make sure you are using the correct head washers.

 

Me too on the torque sequence.  I am going to need to pull the head as it appears I have a bad head gasket from the previous installation being in the 35ft/lb range.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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9 hours ago, Graham Man said:

Olson's Gaskets?  I like the sandwiched asbestos and copper.  I spray them down with Copper Coat, helps seal.  If you have it apart I would think about surfacing the head to make sure it is flat, it might be the problem.

 

 

The plan is to get the head off this weekend and drop it off at the machine shop Monday. Maybe pick up a gasket at Chickasha next week.

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  • 3 years later...

I do not think the head bolt tightening sequence is correct on that non GM worksheet.  It goes against how I have been taught long ago about tightening cylinder heads.  This is the correct head bolt sequence from GM for 1926 Buick.   The Buick head is an odd bolt layout.  It is treated with some bolts that are close together "as pairs" and works it's way in a circular pattern from the middle to the ends.  Working evenly from the middle to the ends is how we do it today.  That other one is very non conventional and I have never seen anyone tighten bolts down one side starting from the middle.   That drawing has made it's rounds.  This photo is from the 1926 GM export manual.    Hugh

 

375691818_torquesequence1926Buick.JPG.32c9234b727a52f63bde85c4999d05aa.JPG1660746900_Torque1929BuickTorqueandHeadtighteningsequence.jpg.2b368b007251ed764065a9c74026d747.jpg1301616901_Torque1929Buicktorquespecs.jpg.6b4be37148f3fd388b3c0ea3737ae59a.jpg

Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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On 3/7/2018 at 12:01 PM, Graham Man said:
On 3/8/2018 at 9:03 PM, Hubert_25-25 said:

That Buick  tightening sequence is the strangest I have ever seen.

The Buick is entirely different.  

Goes against every torque sequence I was ever taught too. Spiral or X sequence, one will still begin in the center and work to the outer edges.

 

They often did things differently in Flint. Must have been something in the water...

 

 

 

 

 

Sorry, couldn't resist!😼

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No I think it is correct, most cars have a center row of head bolts, my center bolt is the only one that is a tight fit, all the rest are clearance fit. 

 

That said I would still tighten the center bolts and work my way out in a circular pattern and uses coper coat for the gasket.

 

Gasket Adhesive Sealant

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