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1920 Dodge Brothers Touring


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Just a suggestion on the oil rod.  I get some heat shrink tubing just larger then the float rod and add about 12 inches of it.  It allows you to put it through the hole while the pan is lowered.  Get some threaded rod and make some centering studs to slide the pan up on.  Make them about eight inches long and install them first.  This will allow you to keep the gasket in place while you slid the pan up.  You can even put nuts on them to hold the pan up.I use bearing grease to hold the gaskets.  Paint the float rod white to make it easier to see.

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I too just acquired a 1920 Dodge Brothers touring convertible.  It’s in excellent shape except to say it’s sat for several years in a heated garage and the gas is all varnished.  So I have to go through it all before attempting to start it. 

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If you don't have an owners manual, called a Book of Information, you certainly need one. The dipstick is a float behind the starter, there are two marks cast into the block to indicate level. You disconnect the copper pipe from the front on the oil pan to drain the oil. Locate the edition of manual printed just before your car was built to get the most accurate information.

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Thank you!  I ordered a book.  I also with your help found the float rod.  I pulled up on it some to find it was painted the same color as the engine.  Any notion of how much oil it should take?  I'd like to be prepared when the book arrives.  Thanks again!

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The Book of Information has some text on how high the top of the float rod should be - as compared to the range of the rod itself. I have seen  that newer cars had casting lines on the block (mine does not). Not sure of the '20.

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Where IS the oil level rod on your car?

Seems to my someone in England couldn't find it on his engine but it turned out to between 2 and 3 cylinders behind the carburetor.

My thought is if the one on yours is up front the low level would be at the top of the raised rectangular boss  at the center of the photo.

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Just joined the action at DBC today.

Great to see so many people with such knowledge.

 

I also just obtained a 1920 Touring Car. Last owner passed away, but looks like he had fun with it.

Starts, Runs, Drives, Good Looker. Quite sure repainted at some time. Upholstery seems to be thick leather.

The front seat base cushion may have been redone. Top definitely aftermarket but has the 6 windows on back.

 

Seems to starve for fuel over 30 MPH, probably close to max speed. Lean Pops in carb, hardly any fuel in see through

after marker filter. Seems super solid, and appears to be mostly original.

 

The black canister in line before the carb is the pump? How do I diagnose the fuel supply system?

 

Car is driving and past owner "played" with it fairly regularly.

 

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Edited by davemccormack
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The black canister is a vacuum tank. Using vacuum from the engine, gasoline is drawn from the fuel tank in the rear of the car to the canister where gravity pulls gas into the carburetor. When properly maintained, the system works well. Without an inspection of the car I can't comment on the fuel starvation. Zeke

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I have an in-line fuel filter on mine (a '25) and it's normally only 1/2 full, so I doubt it is the problem.  I don't believe a '20 is much different as far as power and gearing go and so I would expect it should get up to 40 mph pretty easily.  I can drive on level roads comfortably at 40 - 45 mph (and the speedo is fairly accurate).   It could be fuel starvation but I think it is less likely to be caused by the vacuum tank.  I say this because the vacuum tank pulls fuel up to the vacuum tank reservoir (contained within the tank) and then gravity feeds to the carb.  If flow was restricted here, I would expect a stalling problem; if fuel demand exceeds the supply, the fuel bowl in carb would eventually empty.  As such, I would tend to think the carb more likely has a problem if it truly is fuel starvation.  It think it could be other things, such as static timing being off.  The engine will be down on power if timing is incorrect (retarded).  The MIM has instructions for setting static timing.

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Carefully push in with both hands on the chrome/nickel headlight bezel. The bezel has 3 hooks on the inside that secure the ring, lense and headlight bucket. The lense will try to drop out and crash on the ground, so take your time when pulling off the bezel. The bulb and reflector will come out as a unit.

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