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Jeff, writing about the above problems, I think is a very good idea, it proves that we are human! Hopefully, the knowledge we have gained over the years will help others in the future. I am still reading your posts with interest, but, I am rather frustrated that I am now unable to get anything done on my projects.

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15 hours ago, Mike Macartney said:

Jeff, writing about the above problems, I think is a very good idea, it proves that we are human! Hopefully, the knowledge we have gained over the years will help others in the future. I am still reading your posts with interest, but, I am rather frustrated that I am now unable to get anything done on my projects.

 

Really frustrated myself that you can't be out there getting something done and that I am powerless to help.  If it were not for that pond between us I'd help you get the car done.   Do keep up the hope as I've seen a lot recoveries from conditions worse.  Our family all but buried my grandfather a good 10 years ago as he was bleeding internally and there was nothing more that could be done.  So much for that prognosis... still sailing along.  Doctors are good people and they're smart, but they follow protocols and charts and forecast from that.  Humans don't always fit to protocols and charts.  Here's to hoping you don't fit their prognosis. :)

 

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Core plugs have been changed and I'm happy with how they sit.  I'm not sure how it took nearly a month to get that done but it did.  There's a lot of other stuff going on and that list continues to grow.   I took the brake cylinder out, removed the rust and then painted it with zinc paint.  I didn't even know that zinc paint exists but it does and it is pretty cool.  When you wonder to yourself if it really contains a significant amount of zinc your concerns vanish when you pick up the tiny little can and it weighs a ton!!   It is expensive stuff but very easy to apply and the perfect solution to getting good corrosion protection on something that you can't get in the bucket for plating.   The cylinder is now back on the car and the other bits and pieces are plated. 

As I said previously, I tapped the old pilot bushing and was able to run a bolt in there and pull the both of them out.  I'm ready to put the new bushing in (soaked in oil) and get the pressure plate, clutch and transmission back on.  I sat the pressure plate on my new (to me) granite surface plate and ran an indicator over it and found that one side was 70 thousandths or so high.  I adjusted that so the it was level and honed the surface as well.  I think the throw out bearing should make better contact now and reduce any noise.  Once the transmission is back in I'll be able to roll the car back out of the shop so I can get room to do routine maintenance on my car and my son's car before he heads off to school.   After that things will hopefully calm down a bit and I can get back prepping the tub for paint.  There are still a few misc tasks to do to the chassis before I start the paint prep again so it may be September before I'm ready for that... really hard to believe. 

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Posted (edited)

Put the new (oil soaked) pilot bushing in and put the pressure plate on.  Unfortunately as I tightened down the bolts on the pressure plate the part the throwout bearing rides on tilted to one side.  This was the part that I had carefully leveled on my surface plate using an indicator.  Obviously that isn't how you're supposed to do it because once on the flywheel it was no longer level.   I couldn't find any information on how it was supposed to be done so I ordered a new one.  It should be here tomorrow. 

I got the carbs put back together and they're ready to go back on.  I need to replace the drain spigot first and it is in that group of parts due tomorrow.  As such... by mid-week I should have everything buttoned back up.  At that point I'll be able to roll it back out of the shop and resume block sanding the tub.

Not much in pictures but here are some shots of the carbs before I took them apart to plate the various bits, along with those various bits after plating and then assembled again.

 

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Carbs, intake and exhaust manifolds back on.  Transmission back on with new pressure plate and pilot bushing.  Definitely noticed a difference between the new and old pressure plates.  I even had to adjust the clutch linkage to get it reconnected.  I'm hopeful that was also part of my noise problem. I'm replacing the handbrake cables in the rear as well as plating of few connectors that need it.  That will finish this up and I can get back to paint prep!  

I've decided that before I roll it out I will hook a few things back up so I can fire the engine and try to test the pressure plate.  I'm fairly confident that the problem is fixed but it is certainly easier to work on it now with the tub removed.

 

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Here's a shot of the rear after it sat outside for a couple of days.  As I mentioned before, the hardware I used here was original and I didn't realize it needed to be re-plated.  I took everything off and re-plated the hardware this weekend.  I also swapped out the handbrake cables for some new ones.  They don't look like the originals but they are a pretty substantial upgrade so I feel it is acceptable.  I will need to do the same thing to the front but after that is done that will complete the plating working and it'll be back to paint prep.  Unfortunately I am behind on service for our daily drivers so that's going to take up a few days next week.

 

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1 hour ago, Laughing Coyote said:

I can't believe how rusty that stuff got in a few days. That's crazy. 

 

The humidity is much lower in Southern Arizona where you are than in Georgia where Luv2Wrench is. There is a reason the Air Force stores planes at Davis-Monthan and commercial jets get stored at places like Marana Air Park.

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15 minutes ago, ply33 said:

The humidity is much lower in Southern Arizona where you are

You got that right. For something to rust like that it wold take months, maybe a year.  Even with the monsoon season humidity it wouldn't rust that bad.  I would never survive that kind of humidity.

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16 hours ago, Laughing Coyote said:

You got that right. For something to rust like that it wold take months, maybe a year.  Even with the monsoon season humidity it wouldn't rust that bad.  I would never survive that kind of humidity.

 

Yeah. I was raised in Tucson and I've never been comfortable in places where you have humidity and any kind of heat. Fairly humid where I am now on the beach but the temperature rarely exceeds 75°F (68°F outside at the moment).

 

Sorry for taking this off topic. I really admire Luv2Wrench's craftsmanship and attention to detail which is so well documented here in text and photos. That keeps me coming back to this thread.

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Luv2Wrench, the M.G. has really come a long way. The motor sitting in the chassis is a work of art. Real nice work. Thanks, John

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