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Wow Jeff, You've come a very long way in a very short time from that first lathe.

With a few more bits & pieces you'll be able to repair just about anything.

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9 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

Wow Jeff, You've come a very long way in a very short time from that first lathe.

With a few more bits & pieces you'll be able to repair just about anything.

 

I really feel lucky to have these machines show up when they did.  I've looked for a really long time and not found much and then in the last 2 years I've gotten very lucky.

 

After looking through the manual I realized I was missing a pretty critical piece of tooling... the "the work head".  I vaguely saw something that might be it when I was up there so I drove back up to see if I could find it.  Alas the item I thought might be it was just an alternator.  Fortunately though after an hour or so I was able to locate it.  It was stored indoors but in the back of a very damp basement.  As such it is a little rusty but the spindle still turns smoothly.  It has a B&S 12 taper and with adapters can manage any of the tooling I have.  It is missing one of the 90 degree brackets but I found two of those on the first trip so all is well.  All in all I feel very very fortunate as that could have been a 9 hour trip with nothing to show for. 

 

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Shop is now sorted once again and I'm back getting the paint booth ready.  Tomorrow is going to be a nice day and I should be able to get a lot done.  I'm not sure that I can get primer on but I'll get pretty close. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Got the fan restoration finished and added a filter setup.  After testing I believe my filters are a little too good and I'll need to get some cheaper ones that let more air through.

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

I've made a fair amount of progress on the walls for the booth.  The original plan was to have a 1' tall mini-wall that hung down from the ceiling and then attach 8'x4' sheets of Coroplast (corrugated plastic) to that and duct tape it all together.  I made the 1' panels and installed them in the ceiling and that worked well.  The 8'x4' sheets did work hanging from the mounting panels but it was too flimsy.  The panels I made for the top really turned out great... lightweight, easy to work with.  As such I decided I needed to just build 8'x4' panels for the lower section.  For the upper panels I used 1.5"x1.x5" (2"x2") which was fine but would make the much bigger lower panels a good bit heavier.  In addition it is nearly impossible to find a straight 2x2 at the big box stores and I certainly didn't want to pay for hardwood.  Home Depot had some nice pine 1"x4" (.75"x3.5") boards that were 8' long.  I bought those and ripped them to .75"x1.25" on the table saw.  I used these for the frames.  Glued and nailed in the corners and then attached the Coroplast to the frame with construction adhesive and staples.  It worked really well and I'm very happy with the solution.   I still need to do the back wall and work out how the fan will mount. 

The fan I got and restored runs great but I'm not happy with the amount of air it puts out.  I found a 36" fan with 6 blades and a 1/2" HP motor and bought it.  It needs a good bit more work than the other fan but it really moves some air.  I'm also going to change the filter arrangement to be much bigger and mounted further away from the fan blades.  I think this will work out well and give me good air movement.  

 

Left wall:

 

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Right wall:

 

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Right wall showing rear of one panel.

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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My son and I painted a '67 Volkswagen in a booth similar  to what you have constructed.  We had a large shop area and were able to construct an 18'x18' area with 8' walls, ceiling joists. door, and lighting.  A filter system similar to the one you pictured was on each side.  We used four box fans mounted in the upper corners.  The walls and ceiling were covered with heavy mil plastic and seams sealed with cardboard strips.  It was for a one time use and very temporary as the lease on the shop was about to end.

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2 hours ago, Tom53MGTD said:

My son and I painted a '67 Volkswagen in a booth similar  to what you have constructed.  We had a large shop area and were able to construct an 18'x18' area with 8' walls, ceiling joists. door, and lighting.  A filter system similar to the one you pictured was on each side.  We used four box fans mounted in the upper corners.  The walls and ceiling were covered with heavy mil plastic and seams sealed with cardboard strips.  It was for a one time use and very temporary as the lease on the shop was about to end.

 

That's basically what I'm aiming for.  I'm hoping that by using the Coroplast this is something I can take down, store and put back up when the need comes again.  So far it is proving to work rather well, the panels are easy to remove and install and simple clear packing tape forms a great seal and removes easily.  Granted this is all expensive and time consuming but having a paint booth "appear" in my normal shop space is worth quite a bit.   The whole thing breaks down into the various panels which only take up an 8'x4' space 16" deep.  Wrap that in a blanket and it should be ready in a year or so for the next car. 

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All... I've gotten bored with the MG TD and have decided to breathe some new life into the project.  I've found a blown small block 350 that I'll drop into it, along with a nice reproduction fiberglass body that's already painted (complete with flames!!!).   Might be a little different from the typical restoration project but should be a perfect plan for this day, today, the first of April. lead-640x427.jpg.a76c616ccb6835019785f543e671974e.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Hey guys!  Just checking in.  Haven't had enough contiguous time in the shop to get anything done car wise but I have made some small progress getting some of my latest acquisitions restored.   I think I should have some more time this weekend and hope to get the paint booth finished and at least get the primer on. 

 

Here's the vise. 

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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And here's the L-W Chuck Co dividing head.  This was a great find for me because it is driven from the left side and that's where the drive is on my Hendey milling machine.  Most are driven from the right and the left hand drives are fairly rare.  This thing is an absolute beast and requires absolutely all my strength to pick it up.

 

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Those look great. Nice work. Can't wait to see how the rest of the equipment will look.

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Jeff, I like the vice, never seen anything like that before. I don't know how you get the ;bright' parts of the rusty dividing head looking so good. Is it just hard work? Excellent work.

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6 hours ago, Mike Macartney said:

Jeff, I like the vice, never seen anything like that before. I don't know how you get the ;bright' parts of the rusty dividing head looking so good. Is it just hard work? Excellent work.

 

Thanks Mike, I'd never seen a vise like that before.  It is called an AMPOGRIP and was made by American Positive Grip Vise Co back in the 50s.  There are 1/16" ball bearings packed in behind the 9 fingers on each side.  As you tighten around an object the fingers will give when they first make contact.  As the ball bearings move around and run out of room, the fingers stop moving.  It works really well and is pretty cool. 

 

Evaporust did all the hard work for me.  The little that it didn't get I removed with a razor blade and phosphoric acid.   Nuts and bolts got a wire wheel finish after that.   Really not that much work.

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5 minutes ago, Luv2Wrench said:

Evaporust did all the hard work for me.  The little that it didn't get I removed with a razor blade and phosphoric acid.   Nuts and bolts got a wire wheel finish after that.   Really not that much work.

 

Thanks for that information Jeff. I am very impressed with the vice and dividing head. I bought a can of Evaporust and was impressed how well it works. I am going to start using the Evaporust more often. You would need a very large plastic bin for putting a bodyshell in! :) 

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Completed the rear wall of the paint booth.  The rear part is the most complicated as the two center panels are open to have a 2x2 grid of filters in each.  That give me an 80"x40" bank of air filters.  The fan will be set back about 24" and have a shroud to expand its 40"40" opening to match the 80"x40" filter bank.  I think this should give me good air flow.  I got a different fan because I felt like the other one wasn't putting out enough air.  I bought a junked 36" diameter fan that was used to ventilate a chicken house.  It has 6 blades and a 3/4 HP motor.  It was beat to heck but I was able to restore it.  I fixed a couple of the blades, replaced the bearings and went through the motor.  This thing was designed to move some serious air.  It weighs a ton and it a real bear to get into place but wow it moves the air.   We have rain and storms predicted tomorrow so I likely will not have a chance to put the panels up and get the primer on but the first of next week looks good.  I'm super happy with how the panels for the temporary paint booth turned out.  They are sturdy but thin and light.  Had I known it was going to be as much trouble as it was I probably would not have done it.  Now that I have it done, however, it far exceeds my expectations and was certainly worth the time and money.  

 

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Forward progress today is now measured by full backward progress on the car... as it is back down to the frame. :)   That's good because now the things that go back on the frame will stay there (more less).  The tub has been completely removed, wood restored, panels patched, blasted and prepped for primer.  I've been saying this for months... but I hope to get primer on these within the week and start getting the tub re-assembled.  Once it is back on the frame and complete... I'll take it back off the frame and mount it to a rolling base.  From there I'll spray a sanding primer and start bodywork.  

 

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Jeff,

   Great work on the booth and the MG.  We''ll both be back on the road before we know it at this point.

 

Chris

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Shot primer on the tub parts yesterday.  Almost got everything done, probably only needed another hour but temp dropped fast and while I can keep my shop at 75 degrees, I can't do that when the fan is running and sucking in cold air.  This is a two-part epoxy primer and it wants a surface temp of no less than 60 degrees.  Since it is the base to the entire finish... I thought it best to just wait until conditions would be better.   Today is doubtful as it is 47 degrees and pouring rain... still a nice toasty 75 in the shop, but that awesome fan would have it down to 47 very quickly.... much faster than my heater can warm it.   Monday afternoon will be great so it'll get done then. 

 

As noted I noted Chris's mga thread, Little British Car company is still open and delivering parts.  I got my t-nuts and floorboards screws Friday which was fantastic as I was able to get the t-nuts in the door frame before I shot the primer.   Since I did get to put a few miles on the car and it has been sitting for a year, I'm getting a great chance to see how various parts of the restoration have held up.  I've noticed that a few nuts/bolts that I thought were fine actually needed to be re-plated.  The core plugs on the engine are still weeping/leaking even though I replaced them before.  I've ordered another set and will try yet another installation technique this time.   The brand new master cylinder I got from Moss is already rusted... so I guess it didn't have any corrosion protection at all.  Maybe that's the way it was supposed to be but if so a big "paint this or it will rust" noticed should have been included. It is a real disappointment as it will be a pain to pull that out, paint it, put it back and bleed the brakes again. 

 

Last item is the clutch noise.  The first few times I drove the car everything was great.  Then I started hearing a screeching/grinding noise when the clutch was depressed.  At first it seemed like maybe when it was all the way in but then later it seemed to happen for the full stroke.  It was occasional as well.  I replaced the entire bell housing, clutch release bearing, throw arm etc, etc and was greatly relieved to be rewarded with slight and smooth operation when I drove it after that.  However... after a few more drive the same noise was back.  Since I was planning on taking everything apart for paint already I decided to wait until now to have another look at the assembly and see what might be causing the problem.  I took a peek through the access panel and didn't see anything out of the ordinary.  I ordered another release bearing (which is really just a block of graphite) and will take everything back apart and, hopefully, will see some witness marks of whatever is causing the noise.  The design of the system is pretty suspect and I've read some interesting threads on various solutions.   To make matters worse it seems the release bearings are now made with much less dense carbon/graphite material and don't hold up.  Unfortunately this seems pretty typical.  I've seen some people use the roller bearing style from the MGB and Triumphs but I've heard from others that you shouldn't do that because the bearing is not concentric to the pressure plate during travel (it moves in an arc not straight in/out).  It seems like the best solution would be a combination and it seems that someone has done that by turning out the housing, pressing in a roller bearing and then pressing a teflon sleeve/cover over the front of the bearing.  It is a whopping $125 plus $20 shipping but if it works it sure is cheaper than pulling the engine out later.  :) First I need to find the "real" problem and then decided if I should also switch to this type roller bearing.  

 

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Or...if you know what how it's done you could make it yourself. You are practically at the point where you could replicate most of the mechanical parts on that car. It's doubtful that whoever makes the modified part is any better equipped than you are.

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1 minute ago, JV Puleo said:

Or...if you know what how it's done you could make it yourself. You are practically at the point where you could replicate most of the mechanical parts on that car. It's doubtful that whoever makes the modified part is any better equipped than you are.

 

Yeah I've got two roller bearings in my "cart" right now. :) Seems a Honda Civic bearing is just right.  I still have some research to do, lots of opinions in this area. 

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Think about how it works and go from there. There isn't any reason why you're take on the problem will be any less viable than someone else. In fact, I think it might be better, if only because you've started attacking these problems from a machinist's perspective rather than an auto mechanic's.

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12 minutes ago, JV Puleo said:

Think about how it works and go from there. There isn't any reason why you're take on the problem will be any less viable than someone else. In fact, I think it might be better, if only because you've started attacking these problems from a machinist's perspective rather than an auto mechanic's.

 

It seems that the lack of concentricity is the issue for roller bearings.  The attempts to fix this issue seem to be the use of teflon, delrin and carbon... with the idea being that the smaller amount of friction between the two rotating (but not concentric) surfaces would be eased by these surfaces.  How someone drives their car also plays a big role in this.  If you keep the clutch in when stopped you greatly increase the wear/heat or so they say.  I do wonder, however, what the concentricity looks like at full extension??  I think some measurements and experiments are on order for this rainy day today. :)

 

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Good Job!  it matters not whether you are on the MG, paint booth, machining, wood work or commentary.  Keep up the good work!

Al

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Are they roller bearings or sealed ball bearings? I admit I can't visualize the problem - it's been about 40 years since I had an early MG apart, and that was a TA.

I seem to remember a circular holder with a raised carbon ring... you might look in to some other low friction material to replace the carbon. I don't know how Delrin would wear but it is certainly easy to machine.

 

 

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