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11 hours ago, Luv2Wrench said:

I melted holes in the bowl with a large soldering iron.

 

What a clever idea.

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20 hours ago, Bloo said:

Is that nickel?

 

It is zinc with a clear chromate (which give it a little blue color).

 

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13 hours ago, Mike Macartney said:

 

What a clever idea.

 

Thanks! As I mentioned I read about this technique on the Caswell forum and the guy that did it has a website with all the instructions.  However, one of the things I decided to do differently was drill holes in the bowl rather than use a soldering iron.  After 6 attempts (including 4 ruined bowls) I decided to use the soldering iron.  :) I was trying to avoid the fumes and mess but the bowl is "microwave safe" and is thus made out of something that doesn't really stink when melted and had some wonderful clumping like properties when melted. 

It appears the guy's site is down right now, when it is back up I'll edit this post and add a link.

 

Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Slowly getting back out to the shop.  Shoulder is mostly fine.  One of the last things I did was patch the holes on each side of the scuttle.  I'm getting them ready for paint now.  I tried a test fit of the windscreen mounts and found that they were not even close.  I didn't add enough curve to the patch pieces and that coupled with the shrinking from the welding caused a big loss of "curve" in that area.  I spent some time yesterday and a little today getting the curve back to where the windscreen mounts fit nicely.  There were some other places that needed a little bumping and I got those done as well.  One of the rear inner fenders had 6 random 1/4" holes.  I'm not sure what someone used them for at some point in the past but the only purpose they would serve now is to let moisture in to the back of the car.  As such I filled those in with some weld.  This turned out to be a lot easier than I had thought.  I only needed to get a small pool going on one side and could dip the filler rod in and fill quickly to the other side.  I found I could briefly hover over the filled area and get it back to a puddle and it would flatten and level itself.  A couple of quick hits with the hammer/dolly before it cooled and all was well.  I really hope to get primer on the tub by next weekend.

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Here's a picture of the shop this morning... we don't see this very often here in Georgia.   Some what of a freak snow.  Forecast was for some flurries but warming to 42 and rain showers.  We had some big flurries as predicted and it was 35, then we had a burst of snow and temp dropped to 31.  Probably ended up with 2" an hour later.  All done now, should be in shop later this afternoon.

 

 

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You are lucky that this snow even is only an occasional thing.  Out here in the west much more typical!  How are you doing?

Al

 

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36 minutes ago, alsfarms said:

You are lucky that this snow even is only an occasional thing.  Out here in the west much more typical!  How are you doing?

Al

 

 

Yep, I love the snow but I don't love what can come with it, so it is great to have it as a rare event.  I was hoping to get some primer on the tub today and start assembling it tomorrow but it looks like that'll be pushed a day.    My shoulder is much better but I'm having a hard time building up strength in them.  They still feel like they are just one wrong move from disaster.   Might be more mental than physical.    My left knee is still pathetic and I don't really think it is going to get any better without a replacement and it really isn't bad enough to do that, so I'll just keep complaining about it and seeking pity.  It makes a great excuse for things I don't want to do and until my son heads off to college next fall that works well. 😉

 

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13 hours ago, Luv2Wrench said:

Here's a picture of the shop this morning...

 

That's your workshop?! Wow, it's what we would call an expensive 'bungalow' that people live in, here in Norfolk, England. It looks great. Look after yourself and your shoulders Jeff.

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I am getting some work done.  The focus right now is getting a paint booth that I can quickly setup and take down.  I believe I have the details worked out and I'm waiting a few things to get shipped to me.  I picked up an old 30" attic fan that moves a lot of air (7800CFM) and I've been doing a bit of restoration work on it since it lived outdoors before I rescued it.  I have new bearings on order.  Original 1/3HP motor is fine and the then 4 blades are in great condition.  Unlike the modern version of these fans, the hub to which each blade attaches is a beefy cast aluminum piece, very impressive.   Each blade is huge in comparison to the modern version and nice and sturdy.  It is somewhat amazing to look at this old guy next to the modern version. 

Anyway, the new bearings should come in by end of next week and I'll have it back together by the weekend.  I should get the remainder of the materials the next week and hope to have the paint booth completed by the next weekend.  The basic concept is a semi-permenant structure along the ceiling that 4x8 sheets of Coroplast (basically white plastic cardboard) mount to with Velcro.  In theory this will give me a 10'x16' paint booth that will be easy to store, quick to setup/take down and very functional.  I've certainly made a mountain out of a molehill with this paint booth idea but I think it will be worth it in the long run.  That's the hope anyway. 

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Thanks for the nice comments on the shop.  It isn't a typical shop because of what it started from and how close it is to the house.  It originally was a lean-to style semi-open storage area for the full size recreational vehicles (RVs).  When you looked out the back of the house you faced a 45' long wall that was 18' high!!!  It was terrible.  The plan when we bought the house was to convert it to my workshop and while it took a few years to get to that point, that finally happened.  I only did the interior work but I had a great old-school framer who converted the lean-to to a gable roof, used much of the siding from the one wall to cover the other two walls, frame out and install windows, interior beams and a wall.  I really needed something that would look like a 'bungalow' such that it would fit in with being directly behind and *very* visible from inside our house.   It turned out great and I've very much enjoyed it.

 

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I fell off the wagon again and went on another machine run.  About 18 months ago I passed on a Cincinnati Tool cutter & grinder because I couldn't get it out of where it was.  It popped up on CL again and it was $50 or it was going to the dump.  The threat won out and with a now strong 19 year old son... we went up there and pulled it out.  7 hour round trip and 2 hour extraction. I haven't got it in the shop yet.  I'll add some pics when I get it in.  It weighs 600lbs but was a willing participant in the extraction.  Probably the smoothest one to date, no small thanks to my son.  It is in a lot worse shape than it looks.  Been sitting outside in the elements for as long as anyone can remember. 

 

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Your' are  more incorrigible than I am Jeff but it's a good find. In addition to being able to sharpen cutters and drills I suspect it will be useful for things it was never intended for. I've used my valve grinder for some odd things but that looks a good deal more useful.

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Posted (edited)

Here are some pictures after arrival in the shop.  I'm trying to link these to a hosting site so the size will be better.   (update - hosting appears to work great.  These images should get as big as you can get your browser window.  Let me know if anyone is experience loading issue or other issues)

 

After futzing around with it a little last night I was able to get the spindle to rotate freely.  Not one other thing on it will move... but if I had to choose one, I guess I'd be happy the spindle is free.  Will be moving it over in the corner with the shaper and horizontal mill.  I'll try to some rust treatment over time as I finish the MG.  Would a nice addition to the shop.  It has an incredible amount of capability, from tapered spindles to straight-edges. 

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Looks like you will have to invest in some Evapo rust remover. I read somewhere, where a guy had a rusty engine block and he built a little house around it and used a little pump and mister set up and let it run so it would coat everything for days until it got rid of the rust. Just something to throw out there for you to ponder. I'm sure you could craft up something that will work. Can't wait to see all this equipment and the MG all finished. 

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1 hour ago, Laughing Coyote said:

Looks like you will have to invest in some Evapo rust remover. I read somewhere, where a guy had a rusty engine block and he built a little house around it and used a little pump and mister set up and let it run so it would coat everything for days until it got rid of the rust. Just something to throw out there for you to ponder. I'm sure you could craft up something that will work. Can't wait to see all this equipment and the MG all finished. 

 

I've been thinking something along those lines.  I played around with it a little more tonight instead of moving it to the side and getting back on the MG.  Hopefully I'll have more discipline tomorrow. :)

 

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Jeff, you seem to be a "glutton for punishment"! I would not know where to start with a machine in that state. Seeing the second photo, do you have to make all new revolving parts or are they salvageable? After having more of a think about it, I suppose it is no more difficult than restoring a very rusty car? I look forward to reading and seeing the restoration of this grinder. Mike

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5 hours ago, Mike Macartney said:

Jeff, you seem to be a "glutton for punishment"! I would not know where to start with a machine in that state. Seeing the second photo, do you have to make all new revolving parts or are they salvageable? After having more of a think about it, I suppose it is no more difficult than restoring a very rusty car? I look forward to reading and seeing the restoration of this grinder. Mike

 

I took the spindle apart last night and it is all in very good condition inside... nearly perfect.  The step pulled and the two thrust adjusters are also fine on the inside and I believe I can turn the outside down some to clean them up.   Getting the table, acme screws, knee etc, free with be a real challenge.  Some pieces are a total loss but I should be able to make them.  Like you say, just like an old car.

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I've long been of the opinion that rebuilding antique machine tools is much better practice for working on brass cars than working on modern cars is. They have a great deal in common, not the least of which is that most parts are "machined". Ironically, machine tools are much more demanding than 90 percent of any car where precision is required so if you can get old machines up and running you can probably handle almost all early car work.

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OK, better discipline yesterday and managed to move new toy over to waiting spot with the other toys.  5 gallons of Evaporust showed up today so I'll be soaking some pieces this weekend.  I am going back up to the honey hole Saturday to get a couple of pieces I think belong with the cutter grinder.  Once I got a hold of a manual for it I noticed a few pieces that I thought I saw up there.  It'll take 8 hours to get up there, look around and get back but after that I should have everything and a few more things might follow me home since I'll have an empty van. 

 

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Posted (edited)

. . . . and I thought they were Sidney the Shaper, Morris the Mill, and Greta the Grinder?! :)

 

It always amazes me the weight that four small casters will take.

Edited by Mike Macartney
Added a bit more (see edit history)
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