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Just a note... I've been updating the videos on YouTube a bit more and while the first few were barely watchable, I think the quality has improved a bit.   Here is the latest.

 

 

 

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I managed to get out to the shop and get things cleaned up.  I built a stand to hold the front fenders for block sanding.  It is easily reversed to hold the other fender. I really needed to get these up higher so I wasn't bending over.  If it looks somewhat familiar it is the remains of the table I've been using in the shop.  I took it all apart and reused the wood.  In theory.. I shouldn't need that table again.  I'm sure this rig will also be taken apart one day and rebuilt into something different.  I hope to get started block sanding tomorrow.

 

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I was planning on reversing the stand to work on the other fender but decided it would be better to have them both going at once.  As such I made another stand today.  This way I can put filler on one and while it is drying I can block the other.  I can also shoot primer on both and then block again.  The fenders were already pretty straight when I got them and I did do some metal bumping before I shot them in primer so they were pretty close.  I've filled a few low spots that might possibly have been there from factory. They were probably too big and subtle to be dents but since I'm using a guide coat they show up.  I know from color sanding the tub that the color sanding goes much quicker if the panel is perfect... so I'm taking time on these to try and get close.

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Built another stander for the rear fenders.  Finished filler/blocking for all 4 fenders, shot a sealer coat of epoxy primer followed by 3 coats of 2K primer.  Blocked them back down and 3 of 4 are ready for paint.  One rear fender needed a bit more work.

 

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Got started on one of the 4 hood panels.  First I gently block it to get it smooth, then apply guide coat (black powder), then block that down to reveal low spots.  Clean that off, apply filler and block that back down. 

 

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Tomorrow I'll try to get the other 3 panels to the same state, shoot them (if needed) with epoxy primer to seal and then 3 coats of 2K primer. 

 

 

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12 hours ago, Laughing Coyote said:

Look at you go. Your making me look bad. 

That hood panel is about the same size as the rocker panel on your car. :)

 

Also... I've been meaning to ask you, do you skim the whole panel and then block down or do you try to select spots?  I guess it depends on the condition of the panel but more and more when I see a restoration video they're skimming the entire panel and blocking down.   I think if I did that I'd end up with waves.

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I had to skim the whole panel since it was so trashed. I still have some lows I'm seeing already. I saw your dry guide coat. How does it work? Do you like using it? I'm going to have to get something to get the quarters flat.

 

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4 minutes ago, Laughing Coyote said:

I had to skim the whole panel since it was so trashed. I still have some lows I'm seeing already. I saw your dry guide coat. How does it work? Do you like using it? I'm going to have to get something to get the quarters flat.

 

I'm using Mirka Dry Coat.  I do like it, the only issues I have is that 1) it is same color as my epoxy primer so it can be hard to tell difference between a high spot where I sanded through the 2K primer (gray) and a low spot. 2) A little does a lot and it will get on anything and go anywhere and stay.  You almost can't wipe it up if you spill it somewhere.  Don't ask me how I know ;)

 

For using it, I get the surface smooth, spread just a bit on with the applicator (circular foam pad with a knob for a handle) and get whole panel (or area) evenly coated.  Block with 240 grit (or so).  The idea is to block until the guide coat is removed on the majority of the surface/panel, the areas where it stays are low.  This is similar to changing filler colors as you work, but you're removing much less material.

 

The only thing I really don't like about it is is that it doesn't lie. If you're blocking with a low or no flex block, then it will show everything.  I can understand why it is used for concourse restorations and I'll admit I'm not going to that level.  

 

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Beautiful work. I would used a different color primer for a guide coat, but everyone uses what works for them . The car is really coming along nicely. I love your work. John

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4 hours ago, John S. said:

Beautiful work. I would used a different color primer for a guide coat, but everyone uses what works for them . The car is really coming along nicely. I love your work. John

Yep, I can get different guide coat and also I can get different color epoxy primer.  I'll do both and then I'll have plenty of combinations. 

 

Got the other 3 hood panels flat and sprayed another 3 coats of 2K on all hood panels and that one rear fender.  I'm hopeful that the fender is complete and thus all fenders will be ready for paint.  I think the hood panels will be close so at worst one more round for them.

 

That leaves the two step fenders that connect the front and rear, a nose and tail piece and fuel tank.  I still haven't decided on what to do with the tank.  There are other miscellaneous pieces that need to be painted but none of them will require block sanding... so I'm getting pretty close.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Getting very close to base and clear.  I have one spot to shoot a bit of 2K primer and then everything gets sanded to 600, epoxy primer and then base coat.  I'm also working on an enhanced air setup that should remove practically anything and produce clean, dry air.  I'll add a post about it once I get it done.  If things go well I'll set the paint booth back up and try to get color/clear on this weekend.

 

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Upgrade to air system is complete!  In the picture below I added everything to the right of the regulator.  First item right of the regulator is a tee.  Out of the bottom of the tee is a high flow quick connect for a hose.  This outlet is for day to day use.  There is an intercooler between the compressor pump and the tank, along 50' of copper, water traps and a water/oil separator before the regulator. This system has been working great for a long time and provides nice dry air.  It could, however, be a little better.  The components right of the tee are what accomplish this.  First there is a ball valve so that I can only pressurize this part of the system when I'm using it for painting.  To the right of the valve is a water filter (rated to 125 psi) filled with 1.5 pounds of desiccant beads.  To the right of that is the legendary Motor Guard M-60 sub-micron filter.  It removes particulates, condensed moisture and oil aerosols down to .01 microns in size all while flowing 100CFM.  

This DIY type air dryer isn't a new idea, there are ton of video on YouTube showing how it is done.  There are a couple of issues with this approach, the first of which is that most of these water filters are not rated for 125 psi nor are a lot of people regulating the air prior to the filter.   Unfortunately the DIY aspect usually seems to mean cheap so people are getting cheap water filters that blow up and scatter desiccant beads over the entire shop.  My plan to avoid that was to buy a filter that had multiple industry certifications and that ended up being a *huge* water filter.  The picture doesn't show the scale well, it is over a foot tall and 5.5" in diameter.   That holds a lot of beads which is also great.  I think another mistake the DIY crowd makes with this type system is that they don't have a post filter.  The desiccant beads fracture and have junk on them so they really make for a messy air stream.  With the sub-micron Motor Guard downstream of the desiccant filter I should have great air coming out.   I like being able to shut off (and depressurize) this half of the system and having the "every day" connector.  I plan to get another hose as well so that I'll have a hose that I only use for painting.  I can't wait to give the system a spin this weekend.

 

 

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Nice job on the plumb work. I had a Motor Guard on my plasma cutter and it worked pretty good, but over time the moisture inside started to corrode the aluminum housing inside.  Something you may keep an eye on when you change out the element since your in a high humidity area.  Also check the threads for corrosion when you take it apart where the T post bolt holds it together.  The desiccant filter should help out a lot.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Life (and weather) got in the way again for a couple of weeks but I did get some good news... the gas tank is fixed!   The shop did a reasonable job of getting it fixed the first time but when I media blasted it to get ready for paint some holes were uncovered.  I fixed them with sliver solder but unfortunately that damaged the Red-Kote they used to line the inside.  They soaked it in acetone repeatedly (10 gallons overall) and were able to get the Red-Kote out.  From there they tested the tank for leaks (found none) and re-applied the Red-Kote.  The only charge was their price on the acetone, no labor.  I'm very pleased with the way the owned the issue and got it fixed. Will definitely use them in the future (Metz radiator and gas tank). 

Got to use the new air system to spray epoxy primer and 2K primer on the tank.  Since I have the huge desiccant filter I know longer need the small one at the gun.  I certainly noticed a difference in how the gun atomized without the "last-chance" desiccant filter at the gun.   I already liked how the gun shot so an improvement was certainly nice!!  I'll spread on a little filler tomorrow and block sand the tank, shouldn't take much.   Getting closer and closer to getting all the panels painted.

Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Managed to get the most of the afternoon to get some work done.  I shot the tank in 2K last night so I was able to start with a little glazing filler and some block sanding.  It really only needed attention to the areas where the inner baffles were spot welded.  It seems that process left a little depression.  There were a couple of small dents on the top but nothing much.  Went super quick and I was able to get another 2 coats of 2K on it.  I'll block it tomorrow and see what I've got. Might be ready for paint.

 

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While all the other panels were probably ready for 400, 600 and then paint, I decide to shoot all of them again with a nice wet coat of 2K.   If things go well I'll probably go ahead and set the booth up and then do the 400/600 in there.  That way I can clean them and paint them without moving them around (not touching them, banging them into something, etc). 

 

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I will need to shoot the thinned coat of epoxy primer as a sealer before the base coat and it is a bit temperature sensitive so I'll have to look at the weather forecast next week.  I was lows 80s here today but I saw lows in the 30s forecasted for later next week.  That wouldn't work.

 

 

 

 

 

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John, great work!  I am going to steal a lot of your ideas, like the wooden fender mounts for all the panels and maybe your filter setup.  Hope I can catch up to the point where you are currently before the end of the year.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

I moved all the panels out, cleaned up the shop and put the paint booth up.  I hope to get the inside of all the panels shot this weekend.  I still need to clean the panels, put plastic down on the floor and, of course, bring the panels back in.  Setting the booth up now goes pretty quick, I don't think it took more than a couple of hours to get everything in and put together. 

The previous sessions I had too much air velocity so I slowed the fan down by putting bigger and smaller pulleys on.   I think it feels just about right now.

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Had a reasonable weekend car wise... as usual stuff came up and I didn't get much time in the shop, but I did get the fenders shot with base and clear on the inside.  Today I managed to get the hood and other misc panels shot with base and clear on the inside.  Now I will let them dry a bit and flip them over, prep and seal with epoxy primer, then base and then clear.  Looks like it will be 3 sessions.  I'll do the hood and misc panels that are in the booth now first, then I'll do the gas tank, spare tire holder and misc.  Last session will be the fenders.  Before I take the booth down I also need to shoot the side curtain frames and top bows.   In addition I plan to bring the car back in and shoot 3 more coats of clear on it as I'm not 100% happy with how it turned out. 

 

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3 steps forward, 2 steps back... but at least I gained a step this weekend!  I shot the outside of the hood and step fenders with sealer Friday afternoon.  Unfortunately I had fisheyes in a couple of areas.   Fisheyes in the SPI Epoxy has always been a problem for me and with horizontal surfaces it is even worse.  The epoxy is very sensitive to contamination even to the extent that the waterborne w&g remover causes problems if it is not 100% removed and given ample time to dry.  The key is getting the surfaces perfectly clean and I just didn't quite get that done in a couple of areas.  I took those panels out of the booth and brought the fenders in to get them ready.  I spent Saturday and part of today getting them ready for sealer.  I had to modify the holder for the rear fenders because they way I had it before didn't allow me to paint all of the outside.  This time I used the SPI waterborne wax and grease remover before I sanded and after I sanded I did two soaking wet passes.  I waited a full hour and then did two passes with their solvent wax and grease remover.   This time with the solvent based W&G I could see it flowing out without any issues.  That gave me a bit of confidence the epoxy would be fine... and it was.  Sealer coat laid down nice and flat with almost no texture and, thankfully, no fisheyes.  I ran out of time to shoot the base but I'll get that done tomorrow.

 

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39 minutes ago, Laughing Coyote said:

The amount of paint and clear I used today to paint the Merc's roof I could've painted your pieces like 6 times over. Looking good Jeff, you will be done in no time.

If you followed my prep strategy you'd need 5 gallons of wax and grease remover and a forest of paper towels. ;)

 

Another fun fact... my booth is only 10' x 16' so I'm not sure you would have enough room to spray it in my booth!!

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Life got in the way again... but I did mange to shoot two coats of clear and I'm very happy with the results.  I should be able to get another 3 or 4 done tomorrow and then it is on to the hood panels.

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I got another 2 coats on clear on before life jumped back out in front of me.   Unfortunately each time there is a pause of more than a day it means that I have to sand the clear down to better accept the next coats.  A scuff is all that is needed but since I'm going to the trouble of doing so I figured I might as well knock it down perfectly flat.  In theory this should make the final cut and buff a little easier but it certainly takes a great deal of time.  Here they are soaking up the sunshine before dry sanding with 600.

 

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Back inside and dry sanded with 600.

 

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Needing a break from the painting, I took some time to put the chrome trim on the dashboard.   While it was pretty tedious to get everything bent just right and trimmed to fit and soldered in the corners, I think it looks great and I'm happy to get it out of the way.  Of course it isn't quite done as, per usual, I forget to order hinges and the old ones look too ratty.   I don't dare use the old ones and the try and replace them because with my luck the hole spacing will be different.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Last batch of items in the booth waiting for base (probably today) and then clear (hopefully tomorrow).  I'll need to re-clear the front fenders and will probably chose to do the same for the tub.  The top and side curtains will need to be painted after that.  I'm making decent progress but it does fee like I'm standing still... the more work I do the more work I find that I need to do.  The joys of car restoration :)

 

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T-storms interrupted base yesterday but I was able to get that done today.  I barely had enough base to get everything done so I hope nothing else goes wrong and I hope I didn't miss a big piece.   I probably will not have enough clear to get it done but I'm going to wait to order that until I absolutely run out and then I'll try to order by the quart instead of gallon. 

Took the car for a drive in the neighborhood and noticed that the speedometer wasn't working.  I can't remember for sure if it did work on the last test trip but it certainly doesn't work now.  Very frustrating.  I'll take the cable loose and see if that's turning.  I really hope it is because if it isn't that will mean puling the transmission... not the easiest task.

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Got clear done on the misc parts.  Wet sanded and did cut buff pass on one of the front fenders.  I was concerned about the front fenders and felt like I might need to re-clear them.  After the wet sand and cut pass with the buffer I don't think I'll need to re-clear.   I need to do a bit more cut in the sunlight tomorrow and then see how it looks after a final buff.   I have a feeling it is going to be just fine.

 

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Yesterday I blasted the top irons, side curtains and hinges.  Today I managed to get epoxy primer on them and they're now ready for color (single stage). 

 

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I did the next to last buff on the fender.  It is "done" for now and I'll do any final buffing when it is on the car.  The reflection is good enough to tell I need to wear nicer clothes for my next photo shoot. ;)

 

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That is beautiful and you’re lucky we don’t live near each other, I’d hound you to get you to paint my stuff!😄. By the way, that shirt looks like my Sunday’s best compared to what I wear when I’m working in the garage. Some of my favorite garage T shirts are those heavily stained, worn super thin, extra comfy ones than you don’t even know you have on. I quickly destroy so many pairs of Jeans and shirts that I have my “garage” section in my armoire that those are the only clothes I’m to wear out there “or else”!

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Great work Mr. Luv2wrench!!  Great choice on dressing the dashboard as well.

 

Chistech, the shirts can then be further recycled by becoming the best things to use vs. Nice, red, storebought rags when greasing the front end and cleaning that sort of mess out.  Exceptional scraps can make for gun cleaning patches or pads for floorjacks as well. But only after they have served in the garage for at least one season! 😁👍

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Jeff, really impressed with your paintwork. Very well done. Mike

PS: Just a bit of good news on me. I spent last week in hospital and after a year of trying to get oxygen they have eventually prescribed it. I have an oxygen concentrator for breathing in the house and small oxygen bottles so I can venture out. I feel I may even be able to do a bit in the workshop again when I get my strength back.

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