kingrudy

My long build of a 1940 56S

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Thanks Ken,

  I have been thinking of this and I have had a couple of thoughts on the subject. I thought of small stainless steel tubing, possibly 1/4" with fiber washer inside and outside of the trunk lid to prevent scratching paint and to prevent water from leaking into the trunk. I might get lucky at the hardware store.

  I had a stroke of luck and found the square washer for the antenna in the box of miscellaneous hardware that the shop gave me when they went out of business. 2Carb has helped me with some small items that I'm missing: 1. Chrome clip for the chrome reveal on the rear window. 2. Rod that links the wiper motor to the switch 3. bayonet fitting for the cigar lighter that fits into the fuse. Still looking for one clip for the exterior chrome window garnish. I have three, but four are needed (all four windows).

 Thanks for the input, my target for running and driving with 99% completion is March or April depending on when I can get it in the upholstery shop (only one in Asheville!!). This does not include the gravel guard and skirts that are on my wish list, but not budgeted.

 

 

 

 

 

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Worked on the little things today, installed the gas door lock, gas door guard and the gas door springs. Wished I would have installed the door springs, they were inexpensive and the door closes like a vault. Also followed up on the small tube that keeps the license plate frame rigid when bolted to the trunk lid. I have been trying to find the right part, but no luck. I visited the hardware store decided to try aluminum tubing 3/16". I will prime it and paint it a gloss black. I'll check back when that is done. 

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When my brother looked at the filler door lock on my car he thought it was installed by someone recently.  "People didn't steal gas back then did they?"  Well, it's not like we just invented crime!

 

Your gas door looks great, also appears you have the correct key to operate it.  The back of your door is black, is that the color of the underside of your fenders as well?  

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I got lucky with a couple of things with the car, the key is correct for the glove box and the filler door lock. The plastic holder looks like it was a give away from an auto shop in the 50s. The phone number begins with the letters PL.  I still remember when I was just a kid our phone number began with EM for Empire. The little things that stick in your mind, go figure. 

The underside of the fenders appear to be a dark grey in color, with an undercoating (noise dampening material. I'm not sure if the is how it came from the factory, but having lived in California I don't recall any cars treated with an aftermarket undercoating.  The short time I lived in Michigan, many cars were undercoated periodically.  

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On 7/15/2018 at 10:05 AM, kingrudy said:

Hello Ken,

 

Thanks for the information, I do not have this clip. It appears as thought it is part of the the wiring harness that connects to the instrument switch on one end and the clock on the other. My original thought was that this clip attaches to the glove box door hinge on the left hand side. It appears as though this not only makes the installation neater, but also serves as a ground. I very well may be looking for an aftermarket clip that at least finishes off the install. There is a ground wire that attaches to the clock.

Hello Ken, 

I purchased a clock off of ebay for $40 last week and was only interested in the wiring harness and the sockets for the clock and the "gravity switch". The clock came yesterday and I tested it with a 6 volt battery. The gravity switch works and the wiring is in very good shape. I spoke to 2carb40 and he is looking for the clip that you mentioned. I have been reading about these clocks and I now understand how they function and why they fail, but this might be a little over my head. The main clock will be a parts unit and I will keep and eye on the forum if someone has particular needs.

I also purchased the Service Bulletin manual for a very reasonable price not the $80 one that has been on ebay for a while. 

Edited by kingrudy (see edit history)

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Received this book today and was totally thrilled. I have been looking for this book for the last six months and wanted to thank 2CARB40 for noticing this on ebay at a very reasonable price and giving me a call. the book is in great shape (any shadows you see on the pic are due to my lousy photography). This book is not reproduced, or I would have bought that by now.

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Does anyone have any information about the George Borg Clock? I have restored the clock that I have cosmetically and I'm working on the wiring harness, but it would be nice if it worked. I did read an article about these clocks and the premise sounds simple. The voltage going to the clock separates the contacts, which winds the clock and as the clock runs the contacts move closer until closed and the cycle repeats itself. The second photo shows the contact point and the inner workings of the clock (looks awful clean), from dry California where this car spent it's whole life. The third picture if from the clock I bought on ebay just for the wiring harness.  Seems like some moisture was present at some time or another.

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Edited by kingrudy
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It is not clean. The arrows point to dust.

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It needs a clean and oil. The old oil will have dried up and the old dry oil and grinding dust need to be removed from the pivot holes before it is oiled. DO NOT spray a penetrating oil all over it - that will lead to it being gummed up in a few months. Oiling is done with a fine needle, like a hyperdermic needle. I use the eye of a needle to carry a tiny drop of oil to each pivot. Basically, it needs disassembly, cleaning, repairs if necessary, reassembly and oiling.

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If anyone has any pics of the antenna on the roof (inside and outside), I sure would appreciate it. If you have a pic without the headliner, that would really help. I think that I have all the pics, but want to be certain.

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On 3/25/2019 at 11:50 AM, kingrudy said:

If anyone has any pics of the antenna on the roof (inside and outside), I sure would appreciate it. If you have a pic without the headliner, that would really help. I think that I have all the pics, but want to be certain.

I could take some but my headliner is still there. I will be removing the antenna to replace the rubber pads

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I would appreciate any pics you could supply. When you remove the directional knob and the escutcheon, please take a pic of the two screws that secure the escutcheon and then take a pic of the shaft.  Thanks for the help. 

Mike 

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Car went to the mechanic this morning to have all fluids drained, engine pressure checked and check for anything unusual that I may have missed. Maybe I'm being a little over cautious, but I feel like the end is in sight. 

Restoration shop butchered the glass install on the front and rear glass, so that is the next stop. 

 

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On 3/29/2019 at 1:31 AM, kingrudy said:

I would appreciate any pics you could supply. When you remove the directional knob and the escutcheon, please take a pic of the two screws that secure the escutcheon and then take a pic of the shaft.  Thanks for the help. 

Mike 

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I did start to remove it months ago but only got as far as this. Not sure where I put the parts either. 

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Thank you very much for the reply, this will help with the orientation of the escutcheon and I will try using the same type of screws that are used on the window garnish. Best of luck with your car and thanks for the pics.

 

Mike 

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Are we driving this beauty?  Haven't heard from you lately.

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Good to hear from you Ken. I hit a road block with the front and rear windshields which were installed so poorly, you would not want to drive it in a light mist. I took it to a glass shop June 1st and will pick it up on Monday. Still work to be done, but the end is in sight. 

 

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Spoke to 2carb after visiting the glass shop. The tech was stumped when the metal plate on the interior of the division strip would not line up to allow the installation of the rear view mirror.  He also gave me insight on how to install the stainless steel strip on the division bar. Thanks to 2carb my car will be coming home soon and the front and rear windows look great. 

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Thanks for the kind words of recognition. It's nice to hear your car is getting closer to enjoying driving it again!

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Picked up the car today and the windows look great. No gaps or wrinkles, I would now drive this car in the rain, if I had the wipers working. Next window regulator regulator repair and install stainless on the stream board.  Might do those gravel deflectors too. 

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Just got the car back from the glass shop and installed the gravel deflectors today. I was surprised how much they stiffened up the rear fenders. These parts are getting hard to find because if they were on a car for a number of years they took quite a beating. 

The first picture is the 5/16 bolt to the upper section of the body. The second picture is a black 1/4" bolt as it would have originally been installed . The third picture is the tall one on the drivers side that protects the fuel filler. The fourth pic is the passengers side. Last pic shows the gravel deflector in the Master Parts Catalog, part 8.214 deflector.

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Edited by kingrudy
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After much work trying to get my drivers door regulator to work right, I finally through in the towel. I purchased a right side regulator on ebay listed as a 1940 window regulator 56 Super or 76 Roadmaster coupe convertible. Markings on the regulator are stamped GM-40 and the seller stated that this was NOS part #4113941, so I got out my Master Parts Catalog found the part number and cross referenced this to the body style. According to the book this part number is for a 1940 56C or 76C, or a 1941 56C or 76C. I was not deterred. I measured my regulator on six different points and they are an exact match. The fan looks a little different, but the span across the teeth is exact and the ends of my old regulator are a little wider than the new one, but all the important measurements are right on. I installed the new one today and it works great. 

 

Before you start this process remove the lower stop/ brace from the door. (A)

1. Removed the old regulator and put a 2'x4" cut to fit so the window would not drop down. Manual says remove the glass, but it wasn't necessary. (B)

2. Removed upper and lower glide channels.

3. Installed the new regulator with just the four large screws to hold regulator in place. 

4. Slid glide channel into roller and secured this with two large screws. 

5. Slid lower channel into bottom rollers and attached channel to bottom of window with four #6 machine screws.

6, Finally re install the lower brace/ stop and set to proper height of window, so your window will not travel too low.

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Additional information that may be useful to someone else.... The difference between the two regulators is due to the manufacturers. In 1940 Ternstedt Manufacturing which was a subsidiary of Fisher Body made the original regulator. General Motors several years later bought out Ternstedt  and folded this into GM. The chart that I added below shows the regulator as GM 40 and cross references it to the original part number. I believe that is why the NOS part looks a little different, but all of the relevant measurements are identical to the original.  

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On 7/17/2018 at 9:23 PM, kingrudy said:

Today I got the dash completed (sort of) and got the two most important things, the lights and the ignition switch. The first illustration shows the key position (start) to the lock and remove the cylinder.  On the second picture (taken while lying on my back under the ignition switch) notice the blue circle.The screw is located at about the 4:30 position when you are facing the dash.  This screw holds the switch in place, it also makes sure that when you put the key and the face plate together, that the key will correspond to the positions in the first illustration. I took some extra time on this to make sure that the switch turned freely (if it doesn't, the car won't start). Place the plastic piece on next and secure this with the small screw on the bottom is the switch. 

 

The light switch is held in place by a male screw on the outside of the face plate and an Allen screw that secures the plastic pull to the shaft of the light switch. I know that when this is complete that I will have to go back and replace the plastic pieces, but that is not my priority. Right now I am trying to knock down the large projects and I'll do a punch list at the end.

 

The dash is complete for the most part, I still have to put the windshield wiper switch in, no big deal. 

 

I went to pick up all of the material for sealing the floor, will start on this in the morning. 

 

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I did a search and found that you have encountered a condition that I am now attempting to address.  Your reprint above is very useful, but I can't get the ignition key to turn from the 40 degrees to the 70 degrees.  I've got a heavy duty paperclip stuck in the hole and don't feel anything moving or depressing inside the lock.  I insert the paperclip with the ignition in the off, locked position then rotate clockwise.  I've also tried to feel any sort of detent with the paperclip along the arc of travel and feel nothing.  I'm hearing dad's voice over my shoulder "don't force it, think!".  Any ideas of what I'm doing incorrectly?

 

 

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1 hour ago, kgreen said:

I insert the paperclip with the ignition in the off, locked position then rotate clockwise. 

 

Try starting with the ignition in the OFF- UNLOCKED position, and key in place.  Then insert a regular paper clip into the hole and then turn towards the 70* mark

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