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Installed new batteries in the 1916 Rauch and Lang electric this morning  (7 12 volt deep cycle) and took it for a spin to assess its mechanical condition prior to beginning a full restoration. What fun!  Instantly brings a smile to your face. Only sound is the tires on the pavement. Pics to follow.

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2 hours ago, TerryB said:

Funny how it's only taken us 100 years to realize the advantages of electric!

The rate of improvement in gasoline production exceeded the development of batteries.  After that we had to deal with business interests.

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I would be very interested in how the batteries were connected and the voltage of the drive motor. Did it originally have 14, 6 volt batteries? 

 

Pictures as mentioned above would be great.

 

Thanks for sharing

 

Dave

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I had the pleasure of driving a 1902 Waverly electric a few years ago. At that time, I was convinced that an electric car was in my future. Then the 1 cylinder Reo came along and it was then that I realized that the Reo could go more than 30 miles on a charge!!!:)

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Would be interesting to see what one would do with the latest batteries. You might write to some battery manufacturers and see if they will donate a set of batteries in return for publicity. 'This 1916 electric doubled its range and performance using our new batteries - test drive our new electric car and see what they can do for you'.

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Not the first electric we have worked on but you do need to be carefull.  84 volts DC can stop your heart. I stayed away beings as I have a defib in my chest. Actually the 3rd we've had here. Worked on a MIlburn and a Detroit. The R&L seems like a much more substantial car. We're using 7 Interstate batteries, 4 in the back and 3 in front. Higher reserve power than comparable Optimas. Same design internally.

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1 hour ago, Restorer32 said:

Very solid original if you ignore the gawd awful paint job, likely applied for display in the museum. Apologies for the poor pic. We would have to move 2 other cars to get a better shot.

 

1 hour ago, Restorer32 said:

ignore the gawd awful paint job

Now that's one for the Paint job thread.  I'd love to paint it if I owned it.   I drove Ted Holden's Milburn in Palm Beach,  great car but didn't have enough range to do the Electric Car Race/Tour.

 

 

Edited by Paul Dobbin (see edit history)
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I recognize that car, Jeff. A local guy here in northeast Ohio owned it for many years. He has a few other interesting cars, including a gorgeous late-teens Templar roadster, the only one of which I've ever seen. Glad to see it's getting the restoration it deserves.

 

From the photos you can't really tell just how BIG that thing is, but it's more than just tall. Look at the size of those tires--this is a SENIOR electric car and if I'm not mistaken, I think both the Rauch & Lang and Detroit electrics are now Full Classics. They are indeed beautifully built and trimmed--look at the curved glass!

 

Have fun with it!

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Yep, came from Northeast Ohio. It isn't aTemplar the gentleman has it's a DeTomble. Beautiful restored car. Fine older gentleman. He also has an '07 Cadillac and several other interesting vehicles. He also has avery early diesel bicycle motor. Only one I've ever seen.

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The owner of this R&L intends to use it. He has a summer home on the Normandy coast in France in a small town where electric cars were the norm prior to WWII. Can't wait to get into the actual restoration. One of the curved windows has a BB hole it it. Luckily curved glass is available from several sources. We're hoping to have it ready for Hershey but no promises.

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13 minutes ago, Restorer32 said:

Yep, came from Northeast Ohio. It isn't aTemplar the gentleman has it's a DeTomble. Beautiful restored car. Fine older gentleman. He also has an '07 Cadillac and several other interesting vehicles. He also has avery early diesel bicycle motor. Only one I've ever seen.

 

That's right, the DeTomble. I knew it was something really obscure. THAT is a stunning car. Is that your restoration?

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3 minutes ago, Rusty_OToole said:

Glass shops can fill the hole so you can't even see it. They do this all the time with stone chips on new cars. It is some kind of plastic or epoxy.

They can't repair a hole that goes the whole way thru as far as I know. In any case we will probably replace all the plate glass with safety glass.

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A similar vehicle is my 1922 Rauch & Lang B66 Brougham which I have owned for over 25 years.  It was built in the former Stevens-Duryea factory in Chicopee Falls, Mass. at a time when business for all electric passenger vehicles was on the decline.  The Rauch operates on 84 volts and uses 14 6-volt batteries of 102 pounds each.  The batteries shown are replacements  and replicate how originals would fit in the vehicle.  The side stick motor controller uses a combination of resistance, series, and parallel connections to produce 6 forward speeds and can indicate up to a 150 amp draw at starting roll on an incline.  Steering is by a tiller from the left rear seat with 2 passenger seats in front facing to the rear.  The Rauch features an aluminum body, steel fenders, worm drive and originally sold for $4,250.  It still retains the original paint and interior.              Diane 

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