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New KingPin bushings sloppy


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I brought my spindle, new kingpins and bushings to the machine shop to have them pressed and reamed. They just called me and said the bushings fell right in. I dropped by and sure enough, they slide in and spin. Could I have the wrong repair kit or could the spindle knuckle be worn? The shop said they might be able to make new bushings. I'm not sure if I should start looking for replacement spindle arms. Looks like around $500 Canadian if I find them. 

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If the knuckles are worn, they probably won't be circular in cross section. The machine shop should be able to tell you that in a few moments. If the knuckles are circular, the bushes may not belong to the kit. New bushes would fix that problem. They can make them easily enough.

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Kingpins and bushings are for a 1954 Pontiac StarChief...and now you got me thinking. I called the supplier CPR and they can't confirm if they are floating or pressed in.   I thought the hole had to line up with the zerk but maybe the groove around the outside fills up then goes through the hole to hit the inside? They also think the bushing can fall down through the knuckle but it can't. I tried. Man, I could really use some help from somebody that knows without doubt!

 

 

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Found this quote regarding floating type bushings and kind of makes sense to me:

 

The grease hole in the bushing should be OPPOSITE the hole for the grease fitting, NOT lined up with the hold for the grease fitting!
Also, the bushing SHOULD have a groove all the way around the outside of the bushing and in line with the hole. 
When grease goes into the grease fitting, it is SUPPOSED to go AROUND the groove in the bushing, then through the hole in the bushing and then squeeze in between the inside of the bushing and the king pin. As a result of this method of greasing the kingpins/bushings, greased SHOULD be evenly distributed all the way around the bushing on the outside of the bushing and all the way around the inside of the bushing. Grease coming UP from the lower bushing SHOULD squeeze into the thrust bearing. That is how it is all SUPPOSED to work.

 

I've also read some people locktite their bushings in place......

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51 minutes ago, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

YOU NEED A SHOP MANUAL!  No guessing allowed:P.  

 

  Ben

I HAVE ONE BUT APPARENTLY I CAN'T READ! lol

 

Dave39MD: Thanks brother for opening my eyes! That section looks a lot like my 1949-1954 shop manual.....and it is. I didn't pick up on

"6. LIft floating bushings from steering knuckle." I feel like and idiot and apologize if I inconvenienced any other members.:wacko: Remember that old saying? If in doubt, read the manual. THOROUGHLY!  

Going down to the machine shop tomorrow and pick up my spindle & pins. Also, thanks for saving me some $$$!

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I say it time and time again. I've been on a few forums over the years on various projects and if it wasn't for you guys.....I have no mechanical buddies and in a case like this, even actually mechanics are too young to help. I'm handy enough to get the job done but am a second guesser. I need to know what it is and how to do it right, with maybe the few mistakes! Feels good to go to bed with a smile on your face sometimes. Cheers!

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How do floating bushings work? Surely there are two wearing surfaces: inside and outside? Then one would expect to have to use oversize OD bushes for a rebuild?

 

The check is to put the bushes in with the king pin and see how much free play (tilt) there is?

 

If this is the case, the the knuckle could well be worn out of round?

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I got them back from the shop so I'm going to play with the old and new ones this afternoon. I read a ton up on these. Common with 40's - 50's Chev trucks. They should have a snugger fit in the knuckle than the king pin. When I removed the caps off my original pins, I noticed the bushing was moving independently when I moved the spindle. Grease was on both sides of the bushing. Thought everything was wrong. 

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Over the years we repaired a bunch of axles from school buses to semi tractors.

We've reamed and sleeved them with thin steel sleeves and bushed/reamed spindles too.

I have never heard of a floating bushing.

The side with the least resistance will move so in practice doesn't work since one or the other is going to remain stationary.

Hart Parr of Charles City, Iowa, learned this before 1910 when they tried floating piston pin bushings.

It didn't work as planned.

 

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I HAVE REALLY ENJOYED THIS POST; THANKS TO ALL WHO PARTICIPATED I

 

 IT BROUGHT BACK MEMORIES OF MY YOUNGER DAYS WHEN I WORKED AS A LINE MECHANIC AT THE LOCAL CHEVROLET/OLDSMOBILE

GARAGE IN THE EARLY 50's.  THE SHOP LABOR RATE WAS $2.00 PER HOUR AND THE MECHANIC GOT 50%. 

THE ALLOTED TIME TO REPLACE KING PINS AND BUSHINGS WAS 1.7 HOURS. DID MANY OF THEM.

MY EARNINGS FOR THE PROCEDURE AMOUNTED TO $1.70

OVERHAUL OF AN OLDS HYDRAMATIC PAID ME  $11.40 !

SOME WEEKS I WOULD MAKE $50. (go back at nite)

 

( I have never been overweight !!)

 

I work now for entertainment -----for mine that is!

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