Kosage Chavis

Dynaflow transmission...does anyone own one that does NOT leak?

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It seems as though everytime I read about someone's Dynaflow transmission, it leaks somewhere.  So, I would like to hear from anyone who has a dynaflow that doesn't leak.  What are the tricks?  What are the methods?  Does this thing exist?  Thank you.

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Haha a little cold right now. I stuck a glob where it was leaking at the torque ball flange before I had it replaced after the shop that did the work didn't replace the torque ball. Haven't needed it since but it stopped the leak in the time being. My grandfather told me that one. Now the only place it leaks is from the front seal and I have no way of sealing that without taking the bell housing off. I'm not sure how effective the gum is, so its probably wishful thinking, but I stopped seeing red dots at the torque ball end on my pee pads.

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I'm sure mine leaks tiny bits but I don't notice any puddles in the driveway or in parking lots. I don't recall having an issue when I drove my 55 back in the day either. 

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1 hour ago, Kosage Chavis said:

So then it is possible?

1955 Buick was third in sales in US. Cant Imagine they would even be still  in business if there was a line up of expensive Roadmasters leaking tranny fluid on the dealership parking lot. Prolley not isolated, but prolley a fun legend to reflect on that all were leakers.

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11 hours ago, Kosage Chavis said:

So then it is possible?

 

Certainly.  I think the real question though is how long will it stay leak free.  My understanding of the Dynaflow is fluid pressures are created to make the transmission provide power.  There are two pumps working like mad to make us go.   These high pressures(200 psi) will eventually find ways around seals and gaskets.  Particularly with gaskets from the 50s era that are probably not as seal worthy as today's materials.    Just my thoughts/theory about it.    The odd thing about my Dyaflow in the 60,  when running there are no issues.  When I shut it down she will drip a bit then stop.   Stranger yet after a year of ownership...I have added less than a half qt of trans fluid.         

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
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No reason it should leak if rebuilt with new seals, gaskets and tolerances.  I have 3 that don't leak.

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45 minutes ago, old-tank said:

No reason it should leak if rebuilt with new seals, gaskets and tolerances.  I have 3 that don't leak.

 

 

And there you have it.  Leak free rolling iron. 

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Make sure it is done by a reputable source. Mine was done professionally, but it leaks at the front seal. Nothing to worry about as I never see a difference on the dipstick, but could have been done a lot better if done by someone who really knows DynaFlows. A jack of all trades place will get you down the road, but doubtful they will actually fine tune using the described pressure tap method in the shop manual. Also, bonus points if they can identify the pressure taps without referencing the shop manual.

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If the old seal put a shallow "wear area" on the surface it sealed against (rotating shaft with stationary lip seal), a new seal might seal decently well for a while, but if the new seal takes that into account and moves the wear area a little, it might seal "as new production" rather than "as new seal/worn shaft".  Not dependent, specifically, on who puts the seal in, but who made the seal.

 

Fresh new gaskets make things work better.  Black super silicone sealer can make it better!    Fresh new seals are needed, too.  ONE area where "NOS" can be an enemy!

 

NTX5467

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On 2/21/2018 at 6:45 PM, Beemon said:

Make sure it is done by a reputable source. Mine was done professionally, but it leaks at the front seal. Nothing to worry about as I never see a difference on the dipstick, but could have been done a lot better if done by someone who really knows DynaFlows. A jack of all trades place will get you down the road, but doubtful they will actually fine tune using the described pressure tap method in the shop manual. Also, bonus points if they can identify the pressure taps without referencing the shop manual.

Hey,

mine didn’t leak after replacing it with a rebuilt unit and I am jackofalltrades70

Matt

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On 2/20/2018 at 8:19 PM, Kosage Chavis said:

It seems as though everytime I read about someone's Dynaflow transmission, it leaks somewhere.  

 

Now some they do and some they don't
And some you just can't tell
And some they will and some they won't
With some it's just as well................

 

With a tip of the hat to Supertramp............................Bob

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… do it one step further and find a reputable 3D printer and see if they can use your new kit gaskets as a template to 3D print them in a given gauge of silicon gaskets rather than paper … the heat sink effects of cooling and heating and as mentioned the high psi operational status of the dynaflow coupled with the fact that the case and associated mating surfaces have no reglet patterns just flat surfaces to which the thin narrow paper seals have to lay upon no doubt contribute to the sealing longevity of the unit as a whole … yes fresh new but I personally like the idea of rendering a complete silicon gasket kit albeit in the correct tolerances for any given surface part area … this if not for the complete transmission rebuild at least for the pan gasket at least with the added bonus of being able to reuse them upon fluid changes as well …. - uncle dave

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My somewhat "lower tech" version of that, I've been doing every since I saw the first "Print-O-Seal" style gaskets appear about 20+ years ago.  Plus, after I found out why cork gaskets always end up leaking/seeping.

 

The existing paper, cork, or hybrid rubber-cork gaskets end up leaking from the oil, with time and use, "wicking" into the gasket material and then THROUGH the material's structure eventually.  Therefore, the old issue of hammering bolt holes on metal valve covers might help, but not completely prevent later seeps and such.  Spreader bars on the bolts help, but not prevent, similarly.  When Chevrolet went from Chevy Blue engine paint to black engine paint, OEM, their warranty oil leak issues decreased markedly!

 

So, what I do on ALL of my engine sealing gaskets (oil pan, front cover, intake manifold, carb base gasket, valve cover, etc.) is . . . lay them out on a flat surface, then get some high-heat black silicone sealer (the higher-temp black is more viscous than the less expensive types, which helps for this situation), then put a thin bead of sealer on EACH SIDE of the gasket--top, bottom, AND sides and then let it cure for about a day or longer.  End result is a fully-encapsulated gasket that is flexibly sealed against oil/liquid absorption.  I spread it around on the gasket material with my fingers, leaving a somewhat rough surface, but as thin as the skim-coat should be, complete coverage is more important than it being very thick.  Once smeared around, allow it to cure before use.

 

The idea of the print-o-seal style gasket also got me to thinking.  On many intake manifold gaskets, there is a "sealing concave/convex trough in the area around the intake ports . . . metal or composition.  I would take the black silicone and spread it into the trough, using a genuine Mr. Gasket gasket scraper to smooth it out.  So I figured, why not just continue to cover the whole gasket?  Which I did, smearing the sealer with my fingers on those surfaces.  More total confidence in "no vacuum seeps", plus the clean-up issue, resulted.

 

In addition to better fluid retention, it also makes removal and ultimate clean-up much easier and quicker!  After mechanically scrapping the old 3M Yellow adhesive from valve covers, back when THAT was popular, I knew there had to be a much better way, back then!  So, with a little prodding, the silicone-covered gaskets remove easy and clean.

 

I also do this on carb base gaskets, although silicone and gasoline don't like each other.  Same thing, better sealing and ease of removal/reuse.  The only places the fuel/air mixture are exposed to it is in the throttle bores, which is minimal, so it works pretty good.  AND it lasts many 100Ks of miles in my uses.

 

The issues with cork valve cover gaskets came to light after a car club friend cussed a particular brand of motor oil as "it leaked".  When I asked my machine shop mentor about that, he laughed and said "That's what he wants!  An oil that gets into the small nooks and crannies for better lubrication."  My machine shop guy, being an old drag racer, liked Valvoline oils, but put whatever was on sale at Western Auto (back when it was still around) had on sale, by the case.  He ALSO mentioned that some brands "leaked", but when he changed to another popular yellow bottle oil, the seeps stopped.  Theory verified and proven.

 

So, this has been and continues to be my approach to oil leaks/seeps, using modern items to physically upgrade earlier-design materials for fluid/atmospheric sealing.  The 3D printing idea is good and might come in handy as earlier gaskets are discontinued or have larger gaps in availability in the future.  KEY thing would be to use a silicone which is very high temp-capable as some valve covers can be too close to hot exhaust manifolds, in some applications.  Chrysler built a solid red/orange silicone valve cover gasket for the B/RB police engines in the middle 1970s for that reason.  On valve cover gaskets, adding some sleeves for the bolts to be inserted through, which like the plastic sleeves on many thicker carb base gaskets, would control the amount of "crush" of the gasket for even retention torque of the valve cover gasket.

 

Enjoy!

NTX5467

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I had a 55 Century trans rebuilt many years ago in a local shop here in Vancouver Washington by a guy who was well versed in older cars. Did a beautiful job and not drip one. Drove it for two years before selling, not a drop. This guy liked doing older trans.

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… the only dedicated orange silicon gasket I have been introduce to was in 2002 when I bought a pair for the lower exhaust vale covers on my 911 3.0 engine and they are still on there today with many take-offs and reinstalls because valve adjusted is periodically required … these are thick and soft and can as was mentioned resist high heat enclosures and they require absolutely no sealants whatsoever …. - uncle dave

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