Xander Wildeisen

Cadillac flower truck?

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That car started life as a 1941 Cadillac Sixty Special.  If you look at the one "as-found" photo, it does appear to have been a flower car originally.   Probably built by Miller-Meteor or Hess & Eisenhardt.  It was one of those real long wheelbase ones.  Someone shortened it when they "restored" it and added the pickup bed.  Someone put a lot of money and time into it fixing it up.  I doubt they'll come close much of it get it back.        

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Well the ad leaves a bit to be desired.  Sounds like the engine came from a tank? They leave a lot of info out as to when and what was rebuilt.   For 25G. I think it should atleast run. 

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1 hour ago, auburnseeker said:

Well the ad leaves a bit to be desired.  Sounds like the engine came from a tank? They leave a lot of info out as to when and what was rebuilt.   For 25G. I think it should atleast run. 

 

The poster may be referring to something like this, taken from Cadillac V-8 engine history:  Google Cadillac V-8

Monobloc[edit]

A 322 cu in (5.28 L) "monobloc" engine was used in 1936's Series 60. It was designed to be the company's next-generation powerplant at reduced cost from the 353 and Cadillac V12. The monobloc's cylinders and crankcase were cast as a single unit,[3] and it used hydraulic valve lifters for durability. This design allowed the creation of the mid-priced Series 60 line.

Bore was 3.375 in (85.7 mm) and stroke was 4.5 in (110 mm). This engine was modified with a 3.5 in (89 mm) bore for the 1936-1948 346 cu in (5.67 L) engine. This was used in the Series 60/60S/61/62/63/65/67 and 70/72/75. It was also used in tanks, e.g. M5 Stuart, in World War II.

 

Of course I don't know the poster's intentions. As the clip states, the 346 engine was used in some tanks WWII.  Whether or not they were completely interchangeable, would take more research. 

 

intimeold

Edited by intimeold (see edit history)

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9 minutes ago, bobg1951chevy said:

What YEAR did Cadillac begin with auto trannys ?

1941

 

3 hours ago, intimeold said:

As the clip states, the 346 engine was used in some tanks WWII.  Whether or not they were completely interchangeable, would take more research. 

Tank engines had iron pistons. IIRC an adapter is necessary for starter and perhaps more.

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Would have some value if it had been restored as the original flower car it was. Now it's just a homemade pickup.

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In the "as found" photos, it has a pair of curiously inappropriate lamps mounted on top of the front fenders. They may date to '41, but I kind of doubt it. I suspect that this poor Caddy had been clowned around with plenty before it got to it's present shape.

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 it doesn't have the 4" raised cowl of the quality jobs and it looks like a standard 60S wheelbase. Even the rear roof section. It may have actually been modified by a fire department during the '50's.

 

In my area there have been a few cut down Cadillacs and one Packard fire cars over the years.

 

If I had that car I would toss that pickup box and fabricate a deck lid. Then I would swear it was a long lost Dietrich coupe. They captured the style. I wonder if those are Model 75 coupe quarter panels.

Bernie

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)

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Also thinking this was never originally a coachbuilt flower car.
None of the established coachbuilders extended the fenders on '41s/ used the S60S. Nothing else seems to match up with an original pro car, including the roofline, the trim, the side window, the wheelbase, etc. All the pics I've seen of '41s show commercial-length cars with 4 doors.

41 Cadillac Flxible.jpeg

Edited by WQ59B (see edit history)
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Agreed. As a former mortician, I am certain that car was never a flower car. As the pic, above, shows, they were much more elegant and well designed. The car seems to be a fairly well built, pickup truck. Possibly a dealership body shop converted a damaged car into a shop truck

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Original post was never a flower car. Looks like a home-made P-Cup. I guess it could transport flowers.

 

Here is our 1958 Cadillac Flower Car made by Eureka, Senior Car one of four made. 

Best profile-001.JPG

Best rear side-001.JPG

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Here is a 1958 Cadillac that started life as a Sixty-Special, note the lower rear trim, Fleetwood, Factory air. It was converted into a flower car in the late 1950s or early 1960s it was extended three feet to have an eight-foot bed. It was used as a flower car only as there is no fold-down tailgate.

 

Notice the picture comparing it to an original Sixty-Special. See the difference where the rear side spear is further back? The extension was there.

 

In the mid-90s, it was repainted into a parade car.

As a caveat, I would never disturb and original car into anything like this. I bought it for a parts car because I have four other 1958 Cadillacs. But when it arrived on a transporter, I decided to keep it intact. It has a certain panache in person. Other than the paint and bodywork, it is stock. I did add a custom steering wheel.

20140731_170018 (Large).jpg

9.JPG

11.jpg

1958 Fleetwood-03 (Medium).JPG

Edited by CatBird (see edit history)

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The tank engines were identical internally. The blocks were quite different how they were mounted in their respective frames. The tanks had 1 engine for each set of tracks. These tank engines were dipped in cosmoline, they took one hell of a lot of work to get them cleaned up. They dipped canvas in the cosmoline and wrapped the engines in it.

 

I purchased a surplus Cadillac motor when restoring my father's 1941 Cadillac convertible sedan. They were very inexpensive at the time $300 each in 1985. We used all of the surplus motors innards. It was an easy swap over. We used the pistons, rods, crank, timing components, valves and the hydraulic lifters. Our car had minimal miles on the odometer and the bore was not worn . Just a light hone and we were stylin'

 

just sayin'

 

brasscarguy 

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I can remember a couple of the old guys who used to hang around my brother's gas station laughing about someone that they knew who thought he had scored big time when he bought several brand new Hydramatics cheap at some Army surplus auction. As they explained it, the guy didn't realize that the tank Hydramatics didn't have reverse.

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2 minutes ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

Ouch VL2.

In a bad way. Without the style. Like they made a bad knock off. I think it’s the rear fenders. 

Edited by victorialynn2 (see edit history)

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I thought the length of the hood in comparison to the cab had a small resemblance to the “Big Boy” but not as good looking. 

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